Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Event Details

Previous Page

 

Poster Session #96
Saturday, May 29, 2021
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Online
85.

The Effects of the Good Behavior Game on Students With Severe Disabilities in Inclusive Classrooms

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
LYNDSEY AIONO CONRADI (University of Hawai'i), John Matt Jameson (University of Utah), Aaron J. Fischer (University of Utah), Robert E. O'Neill (University of Utah), John J. McDonnell (University of Utah), Leanne Hawken (University of Utah)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a Tier 1 classroom intervention used to encourage teachers to implement effective classroom management strategies to increase academically engaged behaviors (AEB) and decrease disruptive behaviors (DB) in the classroom. The GBG literature demonstrates positive effects across various settings and participants. However, only two studies explore the effects of the GBG on students with severe disabilities. To expand the GBG literature, this study used a single-case multiple probe baseline design to investigate the impact of the GBG intervention on students with severe disabilities and general education teachers in inclusive classrooms. Findings indicate students were able to understand classroom-wide expectations and participate in the GBG, as demonstrated by an overall increase in AEB and an overall decrease in DB across all participants. Findings also suggest that the GBG had positive effects on general educator behaviors illustrated by an increase in praise statements and the implementation of positive classroom management strategies. This study demonstrates how the GBG can be used to provide positive behavioral supports to all students, including those with severe disabilities in inclusive settings. Findings also indicate several implications for practitioners as well as future researchers in the field of special education.

 
86.

Acquisition of Joint Attention Skills in Children With Cortical Visual Impairment

Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
AVERY KEITH (Brock University), Nicole Luke (Brock University)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

The emergence of joint attention is a critical point in children’s social and language development. Research shows the efficacy of various behavioural teaching strategies in increasing responses and initiations of bids for joint attention among children with autism spectrum disorder. The use of gaze-based behaviours has been the predominate method of evaluating the attainment of joint attention, as a marker of social engagement and awareness of others’ attention. Although children with visual impairment have difficulty perceiving how others’ attention is directed towards stimuli, they are assumed to acquire joint attention through alternative sensory modalities and positive social experiences. The purpose of the current study is to examine the effectiveness of a parent-implemented behavioural teaching strategy via telehealth to teach children with cortical visual impairment to engage in more bids for joint attention. Three to five children under 6-years and their caregivers will participate in a behaviour skills training procedure using a single-case, multiple baseline design. This study will report on the findings from pre to follow-up changes in children’s engagement in joint attention. The results of the study are expected to provide valuable information about effective caregiver-implemented behavioural teaching strategies to increase joint attention skills of children with visual impairment.

 
87. Validation process of French Versions of the Assessment, Evaluation, and Programming System for Infants and Children
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
MARIE-JOËLLE BRACONNIER (Universite du Quebec à Trois-Rivieres), Carmen Dionne (Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres), Annie Paquet (Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract: A need for assessments linked to early intensive behavioral intervention curriculum programs, and useful for intervention purposes, is identified by literature (Gould et al., 2011). Besides, a portrait of the child’s needs is required to make the best decisions for intervention (Bagnato et al., 2010). Many childcare providers report their dissatisfaction of conventional assessment tools (Bagnato et al., 2014). The Assessment, Evaluation, and Programming System for Infants and Children (AEPS®), 2nd edition (Bricker, 2002), an authentic assessment and intervention tool, is a promising option. The 3rd version is currently submitted to a translation process. This study aims to contribute to the validation process of both French editions of the AEPS® assessment. A quantitative survey with two online questionnaires is proposed. Participants were Quebec childcare providers from five public early intervention services centers (n = 26). From those, experienced users completed the second questionnaire about the 3rd edition (n = 11). Results show many positive effects on professional evaluation practices. Furthermore, the tool’s items and procedures reflect the characteristics of an authentic assessment based on the eight evaluation-specific quality indicators (Bagnato et al., 2010). The AEPS® presents a high level of social acceptability, and facilitates teamwork and parents-professionals collaboration.
 
88.

A Systematic Literature Review of Behavior Skills Training to Teach Vocational Skills to Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
KALEIYA P. IMLAY (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Chrystal Jansz Rieken (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

According to the Center of Disease Control, approximately 40 million adults in the workforce have a disability; the numbers are increasing ((Disability and Health Data System [DHDS], 2020). There is growing support for inclusive workplaces for adults with disabilities alongside legislation and State endorsed vocational training however eligibility criteria, costs, and limited availability to training programs often make them inaccessible. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate other training options. Behavior Skills Training (BST; Fetherson & Sturmey, 2014) is considered an evidence-based training model used to teach novel skills to a variety of populations including adults with disabilities. A systematic literature review from 2000 to 2020 was completed to determine what is known about using Behavior Skills Training to teach vocational skills to adults. Eleven articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Results supported that while Behavior Skills Training was effective in teaching vocational skills to adults, there were inconsistencies across components of Behavior Skills Training used, limited technological and measurement information reported, and outcomes indicting that the procedure was not efficient. Recommendations for future research are provided.

 
89.

Evaluation of Staff Training Programs to Address Challenging Behaviour in Adults With?Developmental Disabilities: Meta-Analysis

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
VICTORIA SCOTT (Brock University), Laura E. Mullins (Brock University)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

Many adults with developmental disabilities supported in residential services engage in challenging behaviour, interfering with their quality of life. Training direct care staff is essential to address these behaviours and improve relationships between service providers (SP) and service users (SU). However, little research directly assesses the effectiveness of training based on direct measures of behaviours or the long-term effects of these changes. This meta-analysis of 13 single-subject experimental designs evaluated staff training's effect on outcomes for SP and SU. The purpose of this research was to examine the types of training and factors responsible for improvements in SP and SU behaviours directly following training and during maintenance. Training in positive behavioural support was the most effective training for changing SP and SU's behaviour, followed by active supports. In-situ training and incorporating multiple components of behavioural skills training (particularly models and feedback) appeared to lead to greater changes. Follow-up was conducted for six out of 14 studies, and four maintained their results. The only factor found to account for these results was the use of a group format. This research demonstrates that the type of training and how training is delivered influence the effectiveness and maintenance of outcomes.

 
90. Effects of Prosocial Process on Group Functioning of Two Developmental Support Agency Management Teams
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
EMMA CHAIKOWSKY (Brock University), Sabrina Nifo (Brock University), Laura E. Mullins (Brock University), Priscilla Burnham Riosa (Brock University)
Discussant: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract: The Coronavirus pandemic has presented agencies supporting adults with developmental disabilities with additional challenges in safely providing quality support to the clients they serve, leading to increases in stress experienced by management teams. Prosocial is a process-based group intervention that uses Acceptance and Commitment Training to promote effective group functioning and psychological flexibility. Using a quasi-experimental (waitlist-control) design, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a four-session virtually delivered Prosocial intervention on the group functioning of two management teams (n1=12, n2=7). Direct observations of goals and engagement were conducted during biweekly management meetings. Survey data on well-being and group functioning were collected before, during, and after Prosocial. Social validity data on participants’ experiences with Prosocial and data on service provision (i.e., chemical restraints, medication errors, incident reports) were also collected. Preliminary results indicated progress toward the goals achieved. Content analysis of open-ended survey questions indicated improvements in group functioning and collaboration. However, the team’s group functioning ratings showed no significant improvements. Service provision data indicated slight reductions following Prosocial. Study results will be used to inform the implementation of Prosocial throughout both agencies and its utility within the developmental service sector.
 
91.

Variations of the Diverted-Attention Condition to Identify Attention-Maintained Problem Behavior

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
MCKENNA ELIZABETH KOPESKY (Marquette University Student), Jeffrey H. Tiger (Marquette University), Lauren Casper (Marquette University)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

After an initial, multielement functional analysis resulted in low and undifferentiated levels of aggressive behavior across conditions, experimenters evaluated a diverted-attention condition in which a target therapist engaged in conversation with a secondary therapist and delivered mild reprimands following instances of aggression. The sensitivity of aggression to attention during this condition was demonstrated in a reversal design. Next experimenters evaluated multiple permutations of this condition including one in which a single therapist was present but engaged in a conversation on the phone. This condition required fewer staff members but also occasioned elevated levels of aggression as when both therapists were present. Aggression under this condition was then reduced using functional communication training.

 
92.

An Evaluation of Functional Communication Training to Treat Escape-Maintained Problem Behavior: A Systematic Review of the Literature

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
ANDREA RAMIREZ-CRISTOFORO (The University of Texas at Austin ), Terry S. Falcomata (The University of Texas at Austin), Fabiola Vargas Londono (The University of Texas at Austin)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

Functional Communication Training (FCT) is a well-known and often recommended intervention to treat problem behavior among individuals with developmental disabilities. FCT consists of teaching a functional, alternative communicative response to replace problem behavior in the individual’s repertoire to allow them to obtain functional reinforcers that previously maintained problem behavior. Despite a number of literature reviews on FCT, to date, no literature review has examined studies that have evaluated FCT as a treatment for negatively reinforced problem behavior. It may be beneficial to explore treatment-related factors to inform practitioners and researchers on how to increase the social validity and generalization of FCT outcomes for negatively reinforced problem behavior(s). The primary purpose of this literature review was to evaluate factors that impact the effectiveness of FCT alone and/or in conjunction with other interventions to treat negatively reinforced problem behaviors. Results across 47 empirical studies supported and extended prior literature review findings. Some novel identified findings on factors that can affect FCT efficiency and generalizability were quality of reinforcement, variability of mands, and the exposure of problem behavior to establishing operations. Recommendations for clinicians and potential avenues for future research will be discussed. Keywords: functional communication training, negatively reinforced behavior, escape-maintained problem behavior

 
Diversity submission 93.

Using ACT to Assess Stigmas and Biases Within South Asian Families to Promote Treatment Support

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
KRITI CADAMBI (University of Southern California )
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

Cultural biases are prevalent in our society, and many instances have the power to influence individuals in different degrees. Within the South Asian community, there are numerous social stigmas and negative perspectives on seeking mental health services. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the social stigmas and cultural biases within the community experienced by parents who are raising children with developmental disorders. As a result, furthering their readiness to seek services for their child. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is beneficial in identifying values and choosing committed actions to aid parents in overcoming the barriers they face to better support their child. The specific ACT tools such as, identifying personal values, paying attention to the present moment, and choosing committed actions that are meaningful to them can help shift how this specific group approaches treatment for their child. Once caregivers identify what specific changes need to occur in their behaviors, whether that is influenced by South Asian stigma and biases experienced, this can influence the ability to access services for their child as early as possible. ACT is a powerful tool to overcome the prejudice caregivers encounter and promote fulfilling lives for their children.

 
Diversity submission 94.

A Systematic Review of Trial-Based Functional Analysis of Challenging Behavior: An Update and Synthesis

Area: DDA; Domain: Theory
VICTORIA ANDRUS (University of Hawaii at Manoa ), Jennifer Ninci (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

The effectiveness of interventions based on functional analysis is well established in the empirical literature. A variation of the functional analysis is the trial-based functional analysis. The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of studies that utilize the trial-based functional analysis as a means of assessing challenging behavior, synthesized with the Rispoli et al. (2014) study. The method is based on the method described in Rispoli et al. (2014), with some minor changes including the addition of an examination of interobserver agreement and procedural integrity, and a look at the number of studies published on trial-based functional analysis through the years. The results of the current study add to the growing literature on the effectiveness of the trial-based functional analysis as a means of identifying the function of challenging behavior. This systematic review adds to and synthesizes with the Rispoli et al. (2014) literature review by examining participants and trial-based functional analysis characteristics in studies ranging in date from 2013 to October 2020. We compare the results of each review and discuss directions for future research, implications for practitioners, and limitations of this study.

 
95.

Analysis of the LIFE Curriculum to Establish Domestic and Vocational Skills Remotely

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
LINDSEY AUDREY MARIE DENNIS (Missouri State University), Raymond burke (APEX Regional Program ), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

The present research study sought to elaborate and adapt necessary vocational skills training procedures to a remote climate. Adapting Constant Time Delay procedures (CDT) to online instruction allows researchers to examine the effects of teaching domestic and vocational skills, identified by the LIFE curriculum (Dixon, in press), to two individuals with various developmental and/or intellectual diagnosis. Throughout this study, researchers utilized a matrix training approach to assist in developing the selected domestic skills (i.e. washing a table, washing a fridge door, washing a window) to increase autonomous living and potential future employment opportunities. A multiple probe design across targeted skills was replicated across the participants within their homes with prompting provided over virtual conferencing due to COVID-19. Results demonstrated an increase of task completion independent of prompting for both participants and when presented with the Treatment Inventory - Short Form (TEI-SF) participants indicated the intervention was helpful, positive, and adaptable to their current circumstances.

 
Sustainability submission 96.

Teaching Leisure Activities Using Video Modeling for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities: A Review of Literature

Area: DDA; Domain: Basic Research
CHAIDAMOYO GOODSON DZENGA (Tennessee Technological University), Krystal Kennedy (Tennessee Technological University)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

Individuals with developmental disabilities have limited access to participate in leisure activities compared to typically developing peers. Despite an abundance of free time, this population has limited access to leisure activity participation due to maladaptive behaviors and deficits in communication and social interaction. Leisure activities provides an opportunity for them to build relationships and gain skills that are essential for successful integration into the general public. Video modeling provides several advantages, such as, it can be edited to show the desired behavior, and the video can be repeated for better understanding. This systematic literature review analyzed 16 single-subject studies published from 2000 to 2020 that used video modeling to teach individuals with developmental disabilities to complete leisure activities. The dependent variable was the percentage of completion of the leisure activities. The studies were analyzed using the guidelines of the What Works Clearing House (2020). Participants in the study were aged between 3-35 years and were diagnosed with a varying diagnosis that fell under the generic term of developmental disabilities. Initial results analyzed through visual analysis indicate that video modeling is effective. The study’s limitations and implications for future research are discussed.

 
97.

Comparing the Performances of Youth With Intellectual Disability on a Visuospatial Working Memory Task With a Distributed and an Accumulated Reinforcement Schedule

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
KYONG-MEE CHUNG (Yonsei University), Chansol Park (Yonsei University)
Discussant: David R Donnelly (In Private Practice)
Abstract:

The relative effectiveness of accumulated reinforcement over distributed reinforcement among persons with developmental disabilities (DD) has been well established especially on easy tasks. However, inconsistent findings have been found for studies using diverse task difficulties. In this study, effectiveness of distributed and accumulated schedule of reinforcement was investigated using a visuospatial working memory task with moderate level of task difficulty. 33 children with intellectual disability (ID) ages from 7 to 11 years old were recruited. This study used a within-subject design in which visuospatial working memory task was administered under a distributed and an accumulated schedule of reinforcement. Dependent variables were accuracy rate, response rate per minute and correct response per minute. The results showed that accuracy rate and correct response rate per minute in the accumulated schedule of reinforcement were significantly greater than the distributed schedule of reinforcement. There was no significant difference between the groups in response per minute. Implications and limitations of current research and suggestions for future research were discussed.

 
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE