Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

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Poster Session #96F
TBA Saturday Poster Session
Saturday, May 25, 2024
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Convention Center, 200 Level, Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Kelly McElrath (Bucks County Schools Intermediate Unit #22)
53. Welcome to Manhattanville College's Applied Behavior Analysis Program
Area: TBA; Domain: Theory
LEIF ALBRIGHT (Manhattanville College)
Discussant: Kimberly Rehak (Dr. Kim LIVE)
Abstract:

According to the US Employment Demand for Behavior Analysts: 2010- 2018 (Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2022) the annual number of job postings requiring or preferring a Board-Certified Behavior Analyst has increased 1942% between 2010-2018. That number is likely even higher today. As the need for behavior analysts grow, behavior analysis educational programs have also increased to meet that need. A review of the Board-Certified Behavior Analyst Examination Pass Rates for Verified Course Sequences hints at that growth. In addition to the inception of these programs themselves, the mode of instruction has also evolved. A review of only those programs that possessed an ABA course sequence outside of its first four years of operation resulted in a total of 165 educational programs globally (Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2019). Out of those eligible programs, 37 (22%) of them offered some type of instruction remotely in 2014. By 2018, that number increased to 80 (48%). It is hypothesized that that number is substantially higher today. At Manhattanville College, our NY-state approved and verified course sequence offers all classes in person and fully online. Stop by and say hi.

 
54. A Starting Guide for Interdisciplinary Research Collaborations
Area: TBA; Domain: Theory
JACK FRANCIS BLAKE (University of Massachusetts Lowell), Rocío Rosales (University of Massachusetts Lowell), Elissa Johnson-Green (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
Discussant: Melissa Olive (Adapt for Life ABA; The Florida Association for Behavior Analysis)
Abstract:

Recently, applied behavior analysts have invested greater resources in promoting interdisciplinary collaboration in clinical practice (Boivin et al., 2021; Bowman & Weiss, 2023; Slim & Reuter-Yuill, 2021), particularly through decision-making models (Brodhead, 2015; Newhouse-Oisten et al., 2017). However, no such model currently exists to guide the inception and development of interdisciplinary research collaborations in applied behavior analysis. We address this gap in the present paper by proposing a six-step decision-making model informed by the authors’ experiences in collaborating with music educators to disseminate an immersive learning curriculum to children with autism and other educators. Conceptual analysis of effective interdisciplinary collaboration is supplemented with four pre-requisite skills to consider prior to pursuing this type of work. Discussion includes barriers to interdisciplinary applied behavior analytic research, implications of deficient collaboration for the future of the field, and considerations for expanding the impact of behavior analysis to novel contexts, behaviors, and social problems.

 
55. Teaching Compassionate-Based Behaviors Across Communication Partners to Students of Behavior Analysis: A Preliminary Investigation of Comparative Effectiveness Using Behavioral Skills Training (BST) in a Brief Experimental Analys
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
REVA L. MATHIEU-SHER (Duquesne Univeristy), Duaa Alzahrani (Umm Al-Qura University )
Discussant: Kimberly Rehak (Dr. Kim LIVE)
Abstract:

The field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has evolved significantly since its inception (Baer, Wolf, and Risley, 1968). Considerable re-focus on ethical standards in the field of ABA have occurred recently based on targeted analysis and feedback from inside and outside the field. This feedback indicated a need to understand the role compassionate behavioral-based skills influence practitioners and how to teach these skills explicitly. Previous research used BST to teach compassionate care skills such as basic skills when interacting with parents (Rohrer et al., 2022) and cultural responsiveness in the content of conducting assessments (Gatzunis et al., 2023). This research extended the findings of teaching compassionate care skills by exploring the effectiveness of teaching the compassionate care-based skill related to receiving feedback from clients, caregivers and colleagues through using modified versions of behavioral skills training (BST) in an effort to analyze if all components of BST are required in order to successfully teach a the compassionate care skill, or modifications to the trainings can be made without sacrificing efficacy of skill development to improve the rate of skill acquisition. The research used a Brief Experimental Analysis (BEA). Results indicated increases in all skills from baseline measures.

 
56. Peer-Mediated Intervention to Teach Social Interaction to People With Autism: A Systematic Review
Area: TBA; Domain: Theory
SARA KEUFFER (Federal University of Pará), Carlos Souza (Universidade Federal do Pará)
Discussant: Melissa Olive (Adapt for Life ABA; The Florida Association for Behavior Analysis)
Abstract:

This systematic review sought to update and expand knowledge about the relevant variables for the effectiveness of peer-mediated intervention (PMI) in teaching social skills to people with Autism Spectrum Disorders. A comprehensive search was conducted across the Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed databases using the term "autism*" in combination with the terms "peer mediated*", "peer interaction*", "peer training*", and "peer mentoring". This search strategy yielded a total of 70 relevant articles for further analysis. In each article, various aspects were analyzed, including but not limited to: characteristics of participants and peers, experimental environment, PMI procedures implemented, integrity measures of teaching procedures, and acquisition, generalization, and maintenance results. It was found that most studies 1) were conducted in schools, with children with typically developing peers; 2) implemented the PMI using teaching packages consisting of Instructions, modeling, prompt, role-play and feedback; 3) showed effective or partially effective acquisition results, especially when measures of the integrity of the procedure implementation were performed. It was suggested the need for further studies to evaluate the effect of PMI on generalization and maintenance of social behaviors and its effect to establish or increase these behaviors in adolescents and adults with ASD. Additionally, some limitations to be addressed in future reviews on this topic are discussed.

 
57. A Systematic Replication: An Evaluation of the Prep-Guide Component of Interteaching in an Asynchronous Online Class
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CATHERINE M. GAYMAN (Troy University), Stephanie Jimenez (University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown), Jennifer Herron (Troy University)
Discussant: Kimberly Rehak (Dr. Kim LIVE)
Abstract:

The present study is a systematic replication of a study that evaluated the use of optional prep guides added to lecture-centered teaching (Gayman, Rost & Jimenez, 2020). That study found that the addition of ungraded prep guides did not increase exam scores in the absence of other components of interteaching. The present study evaluated the effects of adding graded prep guides to lecture-centered teaching. Participants were undergraduate students (N=126) enrolled across three sections of a nine-week asynchronous online psychology of learning course. The study used an alternating treatments design. A Latin-square counterbalance was used to determine the order (ABCABC; BCABCA; CABCAB) of the three lecture conditions across weeks in the three course sections: (a) interteaching; (b) lecture-centered teaching; and (c) lecture-centered teaching with a graded prep guide. Total average weekly exam scores were lowest under the lecture-centered teaching condition (M = 72.16), and highest under the interteaching (M = 75.63) and lecture-centered teaching plus graded prep guide condition (M =75.64). This same pattern is observed on the total final exam scores taught under each condition (M = 72.78, M = 75.63, M = 73.57). Our findings suggest that adding graded prep guides to lecture-centered teaching positively impacted exam scores.

 
58. Bridging the Gap Through Training: Taking Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) From the Lecture Room to the Child, Professionals, and Parents at Home
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
BOSEDE ASIKHIA (Association for Behavior Analysis in Nigeria), Rodney Asikhia (Association of Behavior Anaylsis in Nigeria), Eugenia Onwuchuruba (Association for Behavior Analysis Nigeria [ABAN]), Ohimai Ifijen Asikhia (Association for Behavior Analysis Nigeria [ABAN])
Discussant: Melissa Olive (Adapt for Life ABA; The Florida Association for Behavior Analysis)
Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: The competent practice of ABA requires legal and ethical knowledge, skill, thoroughness, and preparation reasonably necessary for a person to present himself as a behavior analysis professional. Such a professional is required to possess and demonstrate Knowledge, Skills, and Application Ability in the context of presenting behavioral challenges in an age appropriate and functional way. BODY: In recent times, the practice of the Science of Behavior Analysis has come under attacks in terms of its efficacy from different professional bodies, service consumers in the community, the insurance, and the government. This development has necessitated the need to examine areas of practice deficits with a view to ensuring the utilization and effective transfer of the practice skills required by the professionals to match up with service demands. CONCLUSION: At the end of this presentation, the participants will learn to match classroom knowledge with the practical ability to conduct intervention to strengthen the quality of services being provided to the community.

 
59. Behavioral Skills Training for Teachers, Staff, and Other Professionals: A Systematic Review
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
COLLIN GLAZEK (University of Iowa), May Kannika Ross (The University of Iowa), Maria Green (University of Iowa), Seth King (University of Iowa)
Discussant: Kimberly Rehak (Dr. Kim LIVE)
Abstract:

Functional communication training (FCT) is an evidence-based intervention commonly used for challenging behaviors. This intervention involves teaching an alternative response (e.g., touching a card) that provides access to the same reinforcement as a challenging behavior. Reinforcement is then only provided by alternative behavior. FCT is commonly implemented with children with developmental disabilities, including autism. However, professionals that work with these individuals are often not adequately trained on the procedures. The current study aims to analyze the effects of behavioral skills training (BST), an evidence-based training strategy, on staff implementation of FCT. An electronic search on the usage of BST, or trainings using the four components of BST, to teach staff FCT was conducted using multiple databases. Two independent reviewers conducted an abstract and full-text review to identify studies that met criteria for inclusion. All disagreements were resolved via discussion. Forward and ancestral searches were done on all articles found through the full-text review. Identified studies (n = 16) show promise for the use of BST to teach staff FCT. The lack of large-scale research and reliance on unstandardized measures may limit the dissemination of an apparently effective technique. Implications for practice follow a description of the findings.

 
205. The Impacts of Teacher's PRIDE (Praise, Reflection, Imitation, Description, Enjoy) Skill Acquisition on Student Challenging Behavior
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
HALEY GARDNER (James Madison University), Trevor Stokes (James Madison University)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract:

PRIDE skills (praise, reflection, imitation, description (behavior), and enjoy) originate from parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT). A PCIT intervention targets improving the parent-child dyad and utilizing positive attention skills (PRIDE) in response to the child’s behavior. PRIDE skills are involved in the child-directed interaction (CDI) phase of PCIT in which the child takes lead during play. Since the development of PCIT, teacher-child interaction training (TCIT) has been created to target the teacher-student dyad. TCIT also utilizes PRIDE skills on a class wide and individualized level. The present study will include an intervention on PRIDE skills with two public school teachers. The intervention will follow a behavioral skills training (BST) model, in which the primary researcher will instruct, model, rehearse, and provide feedback on each skill. Teachers will utilize the PRIDE skills in a group-based play time in which student behavior will also be monitored utilized partial interval recording. The present study will use a multiple baseline across behaviors design, in which the PRIDE skills will be implemented sequentially in pairs. The hypothesis of the primary researcher is that as teacher PRIDE skill acquisition increases, student challenging behavior will decrease.

 
 

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