Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

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Poster Session #292G
OBM Sunday Poster Session
Sunday, May 26, 2024
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Convention Center, 200 Level, Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Elizabeth A. Sanabria-Fitter (Centria Autism)
65. Effects of Automated Prompts and Feedback on Data Collection Timeliness
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Nicole Marie Nenninger (Salve Regina University), SARAH SUDHOFF (Salve Regina University), Chloe A Calkins (Salve Regina University), Megan Ellsworth (Salve Regina University), Cody Morris (Salve Regina University )
Discussant: Elizabeth A. Sanabria-Fitter (Centria Autism)
Abstract: According to the Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts (2021), behavior analysts are obligated to collect and graph data to inform clinical decisions. The timeliness with which data are collected may impact their accuracy and utility. Therefore, the current project seeks to examine the effects of automated prompting and feedback embedded in an electronic data collection system on the timeliness of collected data. Undergraduate students were recruited to watch a two-hour clinical video while collecting data with both a basic electronic data collection system and an enhanced electronic data collection system with automated prompts and feedback. Preliminary results suggest that the addition of automated prompting and immediate feedback following data collection intervals increased the percentage of intervals collected on time. The data were collected, and the intervention was delivered via an electronic system, so interobserver and procedural integrity data were not collected. Issues with the technology were not observed or reported. The findings of this study align with previous research and extend the analysis of irreversibility when using enhanced electronic data collection systems.
 
66. Implementation of a Residential Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports Model for Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CAROL ANNE MCNELLIS (Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health ), Leeann Haffner (Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health)
Discussant: Jacob Papazian (Capella University)
Abstract:

The Devereux Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (D-PBIS) model for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) was developed to promote a culture focusing staff on prevention, teaching, and acknowledgement in our residential programs. D-PBIS-IDD draws its theoretical foundations from applied behavior analysis, person-centered values, and trauma-informed care. Central to the model is the embedding of evidence-based practices across three tiers of support: universal, targeted, and intensive. Since the model was first developed and piloted in a Devereux Pennsylvania Center in 2013, the model has expanded to all of our programs with adults with IDD in six states serving over 1000 individuals with IDD in community-based homes. Data presented will be from the pilot Center which operates 75 residences serving 304 individuals. Because direct care staff provide universal interventions and supports, the model uses Behavior Skills Training (BST), a proven method of performance management for staff training. Training includes coaching, frequent integrity checks, and performance feedback by supervisors and clinicians. The BST model will be described and supported with corresponding implementation integrity data graphs. Additionally, graphs of key indicators of meaningful outcomes such as decreases in use of restraints and robust individual and staff satisfaction scores will be displayed.

 
67. The Effectiveness of Feedback on Special Education Teacher Performance: A Meta-Analysis
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
JENNIFER S. LAURIELLO (Lehigh University), Kristi Morin (Lehigh University), Kimberly McFadden (Lehigh University)
Discussant: Elizabeth A. Sanabria-Fitter (Centria Autism)
Abstract: Performance feedback plays a crucial role in enhancing supervisory practices within special education, supporting educators in refining teaching methods and fostering a supportive learning environment. Despite its evidence base, existing reviews of the literature reveal that feedback delivered to both general and special educators lacks universal effectiveness. The purpose of this study is to evaluate single-case experimental designs that implemented a feedback intervention on performance outcomes of special education teachers. Our meta-analysis reports on the overall effectiveness of performance feedback and moderator analyses related to participant and intervention characteristics. Further, we examine the impact of methodological quality on the efficacy of performance feedback. Initial results indicate that performance feedback is effective with this population. As the demand for qualified special educators continues to grow, identifying the most potent way to deliver feedback is necessary to ensure effective instructional delivery and promote student outcomes. We will discuss implications for research and practice and provide recommendations to enhance the effectiveness of performance feedback to continue to optimize supervisory strategies in special education.
 
68. The Impact of Data Collection Method on Data Collection Integrity
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
MEGAN ELLSWORTH (Salve Regina University; Pathways Strategic Teaching Center), Cody Morris (Salve Regina University )
Discussant: Jacob Papazian (Capella University)
Abstract: Behavior analysts rely on accurate and timely data collection to effectively inform their clinical decision-making. Data collection that takes place prematurely or is delayed can lead to inaccuracies in the data. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the timeliness of data collection using a basic electronic data collection system compared to an enhanced system with automated prompting and feedback. Direct care staff from a special education school were recruited to observe a client and take one-minute partial-interval data on behavior for ten-minute sessions using the basic and enhanced electronic data collection systems. Preliminary results suggest that the enhanced data collection system facilitated increased timeliness in data collection across participants. Since an electronic system was used to collect data, interobserver agreement data were not collected. Findings from the current project may help to inform which features should be included in data collection systems to aid in timely data collection.
 
69. A Survey Evaluating the Use of Organizational Behavior Management Assessments in Behavior Analytic Organizations
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
NATALIA VELASCO RODRIGUEZ (The Chicago School - Chicago Campus), Chivon Niziolek (The Chicago School, College of Professional and Graduate Studies), Kristyn Peterson (Zendicoded ), Samantha Denegri (The Chicago School - Chicago Campus ), Erin Herndon (The Chicago School - Chicago Campus)
Discussant: Elizabeth A. Sanabria-Fitter (Centria Autism)
Abstract:

As the demand for behavior analysts steadily rises, behavior analytic organizations face the challenges of their expanding size and complexity. This research explores the need for these organizations to incorporate assessments derived from Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) to enhance efficiency and sustain long-term viability. Despite the inclusion of OBM instruction in all ABAI Verified Course Sequences, a noticeable gap exists in the literature concerning the application of these assessments within behavior-analytic organizations. This study seeks to identify the barriers hindering BCBAs from implementing OBM best practices in service delivery. The research includes a succinct review of selected OBM assessments and outlines the methodology for developing a survey to comprehend the existing service delivery gaps. The survey results will be presented, shedding light on the current landscape of OBM utilization in behavior-analytic organizations. The findings will be discussed, providing practical considerations for those involved in service delivery, along with recommendations for enhancing training and competency. The research also outlines potential avenues for future exploration in this critical area. The study contributes valuable insights to the evolving field of behavior analysis, emphasizing the importance of integrating OBM assessments for optimal organizational efficiency and sustained growth.

 
Sustainability submission 70. Barriers and Facilitators of Effective Applied Behavior Analysis Treatment
Area: OBM; Domain: Basic Research
Elizabeth Marie Rodriguez (The University of Texas at Austin), PATRICIO ERHARD (University of Texas at Austin), Alyssa Lansford (UT Austin ), Lauren Hazledine Hampton (The University of Texas at Austin)
Discussant: Jacob Papazian (Capella University)
Abstract:

Despite the growing need for applied behavior analysis (ABA) in past years, the field has experienced persistent issues about the access and delivery of services to autistic communities. For example, high burnout, low job satisfaction, and low levels of workplace support for board-certified behavior analysts (BCBAs) have been associated with high turnover, an issue that can lead to reduced staffing and delivery of applied behavior analytic services. Regardless of the growing number of burnout studies associated with ABA, more research needs to be conducted about the barriers (or facilitators) arising in the field today. For instance, LeBlanc et al., (2019) assessed barriers to effective caseload management indicating that barriers to treatment were overcome by having a good understanding of funding constraints, awareness of contingencies for adequate performance, and effective time management. As such, the authors recommended that systems at the macro/institution level can help overcome these barriers (i.e., can act as facilitators to quality case management). Given the suggestion that macro changes could facilitate overcoming barriers in ABA along with the lack of research on facilitators of effective ABA strategies, the purpose of this paper was to determine the barriers and facilitators of ABA practices from the perspective of BCBAs, behavior technicians, and assistant board-certified behavior analysts through a survey. These issues included having participants identify issues that keep them from performing their jobs at the micro (e.g., personal), meso (e.g., infrastructural), and macro (e.g., systemic) factors that may facilitate positive work performance or inhibit quality or quantity of services. Descriptive data was summarized using percentages. Implications of descriptive data are discussed as they relate to the improvement of the delivery and staffing of ABA services.

 
71. Addressing Reactivity Challenges: Video Self-Monitoring to Boost Discrete Trial Instruction (DTI) Treatment Integrity
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
AMBER R. PADEN (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Discussant: Elizabeth A. Sanabria-Fitter (Centria Autism)
Abstract:

Previous research has shown low treatment integrity can lead to decreased effectiveness and efficiency of skill acquisition during DTI (Carroll et al, 2013). Pantermuehl and Lechago (2015) found that during covert observations, treatment integrity ranged from 18.6 to 76% whereas during overt observations, integrity was as high as 100%. This shows reactivity continues to be an obstacle within DTI service delivery. It is important to investigate how reactivity affects staff performance and identify ways to increase and maintain high integrity. Finding a socially acceptable, effective, and efficient method to increase and maintain high levels of staff treatment integrity when no supervisor is present is critical in the clinic setting. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of video self-monitoring in increasing and maintaining high treatment integrity for staff implementing DTI during covert and overt observations. Participants included four staff working one-on-one with children with ASD implementing DTI with less than 90% integrity during covert or overt observations. Results show video self-monitoring was effective at increasing staff treatment integrity and maintaining high integrity over time.

 
72. The Effects of Pyramidal Behavioral Skills Training With Enhanced Visual Instructions on the Treatment Integrity of Direct Care Staff
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
LYNDE KAYSER (Judge Rotenberg Education Center)
Discussant: Jacob Papazian (Capella University)
Abstract:

While empirical evidence supports adequate treatment integrity levels as an imperative component of facilitating client progress, training failures are an ongoing and pervasive problem in behavior analysis. Despite its recognition as an empirically supported training package, behavioral skills training (BST) is not consistently implemented in behavior analytic settings due to the response effort and time commitment associated with its implementation. Recent research demonstrates that pyramidal BST, which employs a train-the-trainer model, may be an efficacious and less resource-intensive iteration of BST. However, findings indicate that pyramidal BST in isolation may not be effective when implemented across staff members without a formal education in a related field. The current research evaluated the effects of pyramidal BST with enhanced visual instructions (EVI) on treatment integrity across staff without relevant educational experience. Findings demonstrated that following BST provided by the primary researcher, participant trainers acquired the ability to implement a BST package with 100% fidelity across participant trainees. Training provided by participant trainers was effective in increasing treatment integrity levels across participant trainees in the acquisition of a backward chaining procedure. Findings suggest that pyramidal BST implemented in conjunction with EVI can effectively increase treatment integrity levels across staff with diverse educational backgrounds.

 
73. Basic Demonstration of the Effects of Behavior Skills Training (BST) on Achievable Goal Preparation in Treatment Plans
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
KIMBERLI SANTA MARIA (Butterfly Effects), Jennifer Oren (Butterfly Effects), Elise Escobar (Butterfly Effects)
Discussant: Elizabeth A. Sanabria-Fitter (Centria Autism)
Abstract:

When skill acquisition goals in treatment plans are individualized and achievable, the client (service recipient), parents/caretakers, and other stakeholders can access reinforcement related to mastery of goals. Insurance companies that fund the services also expect reasonable levels of client progress. A baseline review of the treatment plans prepared by 4 Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) discovered that a low percentage (less than 80%) of goals were being mastered in each 6-month treatment period. Behavior Skills Training (BST) was conducted with the BCBAs to improve the preparation of individualized treatment plans so that 80% or more of the client's goals would likely be met within 6 months. Examples and non-examples were presented, and objective criteria were scored during BST. The BCBAs were provided practice opportunities with expert feedback until goal preparation skills were mastered. BST was also applied while reviewing each BCBA's treatment plans (e.g., goals not met, baseline, mastery criteria, data trend). Each BCBA was encouraged to self-score the criteria. During Baseline, the BCBAs met the criteria (enter 4 baseline data values here). Because client progress was a priority, a multiple-probe or baseline design was not employed. During BST, three BCBAs improved to 80-100% of the criteria and stayed at this level. One BCBA achieved this level in the second BST session. All BCBAs received 4-5 BST sessions. BST sessions were discontinued, and one maintenance check occurred. All BCBAs maintained their skills at 80-100% of the criteria.

 
74. Applicability of Performance Management in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Care for People With Autism
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CLÁUDIO ALMEIDA SARILHO (NEXO - Intervenção Comportamental), Cintia Perez Duarte (Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie)
Discussant: Jacob Papazian (Capella University)
Abstract:

Performance Management (PM) there a fundamental role in evaluating team performance, ensuring quality for the customer. This study aims to develop and evaluate the applicability of a PM system in an ABA service company. The supervisors evaluated the performance of the applicators, with more than three months of experience in the company. An internally prepared questionnaire was used, consisting of 59 questions distributed in nine areas: (1) therapist behavior in the presence of the child, (2) preparation of the learning environment, (3) organization of activities, (4) instructions for the client , (5) manage consequences, (6) prompt, (7) maximize progress (8) relationship, responsibility and professional behavior and (9) therapist behavior during supervision. Supervisors had 30 days to evaluate their teams after sending the questionnaire. Data analysis, carried out using inferential descriptive statistics, highlighted strengths such as superior performance in positive reinforcement (79%) and in relationships with families (88%). However, areas of deficit were identified, including partially predominant performance in differential reinforcement (50%), variety of teaching locations (42%), and frequency of supervision (33%). These conclusions suggest suggestions for continuous improvement in the practice of behavioraltherapists.

 
 

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