Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

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Poster Session #484D
EDC Monday Poster Session
Monday, May 27, 2024
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Convention Center, 200 Level, Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Kellie P. Goldberg (Bancroft)
35. College Students Self-Management
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
HELOISA CURSI CAMPOS (University of Central Oklahoma), Lexus Slawson (University of Central Oklahoma), Heather Rhodes-Newby (University of Central Oklahoma)
Discussant: Kellie P. Goldberg (Bancroft)
Abstract: College students frequently encounter stressors associated with academic life, impacting their overall well-being and academic performance. This study explores the efficacy of self-management as an alternative for addressing these challenges. The self-management approach involves (1) selecting a target behavior for change, (2) recording its occurrence, (3) establishing and progressively increasing a reachable criterion, (4) choosing a reward or reinforcer for the target behavior, and (5) monitoring and adjusting the strategy as needed. Ten college students participated in a nonconcurrent multiple-baseline design across behaviors. Participants received instructions on self-management principles, collected baseline and intervention data, and engaged in weekly discussions about their progress and challenges with a researcher. Preliminary findings from one participant indicate a decrease in the target behavior from Baseline 1 to Intervention 2, suggesting that college students can acquire self-management skills to address behavioral needs. However, the study faced limitations, including extensive participant commitment leading to increased attrition.
 
36. Effects of Concrete and Virtual Manipulatives on Solving Algebraic Equations by Students With Disabilities
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Jessica Thomas (Auburn University at Montgomery), SARA C. BICARD (Auburn University at Montgomery), Kate Simmons (Auburn University at Montgomery)
Discussant: Lisa Marie Ambrosek (The University of Kansas)
Abstract:

This study is a replication of Satsangi, Bouck, and Roberts (2016) with three 6th grade students with learning or intellectual disabilities who received special education services in a large suburban school. A single subject alternating treatments design was used to analyze the effects of concrete and virtual manipulatives on the percent of correctly solved one and two-step linear algebraic equations. Concrete manipulatives involved physically manipulating algebra tiles to solve an equation. Virtual manipulatives were computer-based algebra tiles presented on a website. Students had access to concrete and virtual manipulatives to solve algebraic equations during baseline. During intervention phase, virtual and concrete manipulatives randomly alternated to assess student performance. The last phase consisted of the best treatment only. All students exceeded their average baseline scores using both forms of manipulatives across intervention and best treatment phases. The average Percentage of Non-overlapping Data across participants (90%) and a combined weighted average Tau-U (0.93) confirmed concrete manipulatives as a highly effective intervention for all students and virtual manipulatives as a highly effective intervention for two of the three students. Interobserver-agreement for 30% of the sessions ranged from 83.5% to 100% across participants. Treatment integrity was 100% for all three students in this study.

 
37. Values-Based Self-Management Intervention for High School Students: Fostering Psychological Flexibility and Goal Attainment
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
TAYLOR CARROLL (Missouri State University), Blayne Stemple (Missouri State University), Ryan Moser (Missouri State University), Dana Paliliunas (Missouri State University), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Ray Burke (Apex Regional Program)
Discussant: Kellie P. Goldberg (Bancroft)
Abstract: Self-management is defined as the personal application of behavior change tactics to achieve a desired change in behavior (Cooper et al. (2007). Self-management skills have been shown to target increase in productivity, goal attainment, and contribution to society by individuals (Marshall, 2022). Values-based self-management integrates the profound desires and core yearnings an individual possesses with the crucial habits acquired through self-management practices and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy / Training. In the present study, we adapted VBSM to support three high school-age students who attended a specialized school for disabilities and mental health services. Interviews were conducted to select personalized accelerative targets for each participant and a LIFE curricular program was adapted to teach the participants to self-monitor their behavior in the natural environment. VBSM was then designed to increase the accelerative target while increasing psychological flexbility for the participants. Results supported the efficacy of this adapted intervention program delivered through telehealth that is highly individualized to promote value-consistent behavior for adolescents with disabilities and mental health challenges.
 
39. Effects of Digital Token Economies on Students' Problem Behavior and Academic Engagement
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
SILJA DIS GUÐJÓNSDÓTTIR (Behavior Analyst and Consultant at Kopavogur Iceland), Anna-Lind Petursdottir (University of Iceland)
Discussant: Kellie P. Goldberg (Bancroft)
Abstract: This study examined the effects of individualized token reinforcement systems, administered with the Beanfee application, on persistent problem behavior and lack of academic engagement of four 7- to 10-year-old male students in inclusive classrooms in Iceland. After behavioral expectations and goals had been established, teachers and students independently evaluated target behavior at the end of each lesson through the Beanfee application, and students earned bean tokens for honest evaluations and meeting expectations. Parents checked assessments through the Beanfee application at home and provided backup reinforcers when their child had earned sufficient tokens to purchase a reward in the electronic Beanstore. Intervention for each participant lasted 4-6 weeks. A multiple baseline design across participants showed that implementation of Beanfee led to clear reductions in disruptive behavior, measured with partial-interval recording, and increases in academic engagement, measured with whole-interval recordings. On average, disruptive behavior decreased by 66.9% and academic engagement increased by 150%. Assessments of procedural fidelity and social validity of Beanfee were high. Results indicate that individualized Beanfee token reinforcement systems administered by teachers in collaboration with students and their parents, can reduce persistent problem behavior and promote academic engagement in inclusive classrooms.
 
40. Using Self-Monitoring and Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior Without Extinction to Increase On-Task Behavior
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
KALEIGH CERNOSEK (University of South Florida)
Discussant: Lisa Marie Ambrosek (The University of Kansas)
Abstract:

High-risk youth who experience emotional, mental, or behavioral disturbances are often placed in residential care. Implementing escape extinction is not always feasible or appropriate in residential care and can be counter-productive if not implemented with high fidelity. However, manipulating the parameters of reinforcement (rate, quality, magnitude, immediacy) may be an effective alternative to extinction. Additionally, previous research has shown that self-monitoring can promote on-task behavior for individuals with emotional and behavioral disorders. We evaluated the effects of self-monitoring and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior without extinction to increase on-task behavior during educational tasks in a 13-year-old male residing at a psychiatric residential treatment facility. During baseline, the participant engaged in on-task behavior during 0% of the intervals. During the intervention phase, on-task behavior increased during both morning and afternoon observations. Results suggest that when extinction is not feasible, alternative strategies may be successful in reducing inappropriate behavior and increasing appropriate behavior.

 
42. Key Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis as Learned, Applied, and Experienced From Pre-K Thru High School: From Perspectives of Dad, Daughter, Family, and Friends
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
RICHARD COOK (Applied Behavior Medicine Associates of Hershey)
Discussant: Lisa Marie Ambrosek (The University of Kansas)
Abstract:

Once aware of the power of the principles of behavior systematically applied to help to understand, explain, and predict behaviors, overt and private, those such experiences cannot help but to shape perspectives, grind the lens, by which a parent, or a child, learns to see the world. Modeling, exposure in the natural everyday setting, eventually allows deconstruction of events to the level of factors to understand the past or modify the future, be it the trajectory of ones child, or an event of world history. The 18 years of interactions, noticing patterns of behaviors, habits, offered a lifetime of opportunities for a child and parent to notice such patterns, and eventually explain and predict such patterns automatically, as the habit itself of doing so became "second nature," the neural mechanisms for doing so remaining intact reinforced naturally even when not intending to "apply behaviorism," and even phases of rejecting it. While the Dad/behaviorist was privileged to have had many outstanding ABA instructors, some of the greatest understanding of the real world application of the principles of behavior were taught by the growing daughter behaviorist. Behavioral Momentum, Successive Approximations, and Token Economies transformed from ideas on posters, to common explanations of everyday life. this presentation shares many more principles from the unique shared dad/daughter perspective from Pre k thru college application

 
43. Evaluating Computer-Assisted Relational Training in Educational Settings: A System-Level Analysis
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Zhihui Yi (Univeristy of Illinois Chicago), KAITLIN M. PRECIADO (Emergent Learning), Jennifer Koenig (Highland Community Unit School District #5), Mark R. Dixon (Emergent Learning)
Discussant: Kellie P. Goldberg (Bancroft)
Abstract:

There has been an increasing presence using electronic data collection (EDC) among applied behavior analysis (ABA) services. Studies show that both generic and custom-built proprietary software can effectively and accurately collect behavior data similar to traditional pen-and-paper data collection. The current poster evaluated the efficiency of computer-assisted relational training procedures in educational settings over an entire semester. In study one, an exploratory randomized trial was conducted using eight IEP-eligible students in a public school setting. Students were randomly assigned to either the control group or the experiment group. Through the course of three weeks, ABA instructions for students assigned to the experiment group transitioned to computer-assisted relational training. Results showed a significant increase in overall efficiency in relational training procedures compared with those in the control group (p = .003). Study two evaluated the overall outcome of a semester-long computer-assisted relational training procedure as well as its social validity and feasibility. Results from both studies suggested that EDC might offer unique benefits in extending relational training into educational settings. Implications of using EDC to assist relational training were discussed.

 
44. Informed Perspectives for Improving the Effectiveness of "Virtual Learning"/ "Teleteaching" for High School Students by Applications of Behavioral Principles: Suggested by the Targeted Students
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
RICHARD COOK (Applied Behavior Medicine Associates of Hershey)
Discussant: Lisa Marie Ambrosek (The University of Kansas)
Abstract: The Covid 19 pandemic ushered in a new era in education. Many High School Seniors graduating this year were among the early cohorts of those blessed/cursed with the "Virtual Learning/Teaching" immersive experience. Students experienced the evolution of educational policies which were in many cases developed de novo over a holiday break, by teachers and administrators with widely varied experience, credentials, and resources for doing so, some of which worked out well, many less so, some of which could be described simply as “bad” or “detrimental.” High school seniors taking an elective year long course in psychology apply principles of behavior to the modification of behaviors associated with their virtual learning process. While typically teacher and administrator behaviors receive the greatest attention, comprehensiveness was enhanced by systematic application to multiple domains of humans, policies, subject matter, and special situations. Not surprisingly, the process provided unexpected and novel ideas, including targeting behaviors of individuals not typically included in such plans. Students are sometimes found to be quite vocal in sharing their opinions. Educators and policy makers would be wise teach principles of behavior, and then seek out and listen to the wisdom of those they target to teach.
 
45. Evaluation of the Concomitant Effects of Picture Exchange Communication System™ Protocol on Problematic Behavior Across the School Day
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CHLOE NELL WISE ( University of Georgia ), Tyler-Curtis Cory Elliott (University of Georgia), Krystin Abt (Capella University), Madeline Drives (University of Georgia), Rachel Cagliani (University of Georgia), Kevin Ayres (University of Georgia)
Discussant: Kellie P. Goldberg (Bancroft)
Abstract:

The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) helps build a functional communicative repertoire, including requesting, thus acquisition of picture exchange may result in reductions in problematic behavior if the requests act as a replacement behavior. Current research provides inconclusive data regarding the impact of acquisition of picture exchange on problem behavior (absent additional intervention components). In addition, these studies collected behavior data for only 5-15 min sessions during or after PECS training. We taught four preschool students with autism to communicate using picture exchange using the PECS Phase I-IIIB protocol and collected data on their problem behavior across the day for at least 2 days a week for 4 months. The results suggest that the acquisition of picture exchange through Phase IIIB did not diminish problem behavior and thus may not reduce problem behaviors in schools independent of other intervention components. The acquisition of picture exchange through Phase IIIB across all participants did not result in an increase in problem behaviors, suggesting that PECS does not result in increased distress.

 
Diversity submission 46. The Effects of Direct Instruction Peer Tutoring on Basic Fact Memorization Across a Fourth Grade Class
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
JENNIFER M NEYMAN (Gonzaga University), Kiley Purchio-Koenig (Gonzaga University & Cheney School District), Anjali Barretto (Gonzaga University), Kegley Schuh (Gonzaga University)
Discussant: Lisa Marie Ambrosek (The University of Kansas)
Abstract:

This study assessed the effects of Direct Instruction Peer Tutoring (Stein et al., 2018) on the automaticity and mastery of multiplication and division facts. In an inclusive, general education classroom, thirteen fourth grade students ranging in ability levels participated. The study utilized a single-case, multiple-probe design across math fact levels. Each participant was individually assessed and monitored using permanent product timed tests across four Direct Instruction Peer Tutoring levels, determined from a pretest. The dependent variable was the amount of correctly written products or quotients for the given basic facts. The independent variable was Direct Instruction Peer Tutoring utilizing a system of basic fact levels to promote retention across a math operation. The class was grouped into pairs with one peer monitoring their partner’s practice and providing corrective feedback. The study blended Direct Instruction Peer Tutoring with Response to Intervention and differentiation practices by providing individualized support across math operations, target levels, varied assessment timings, and self-monitoring. Results of the study indicated that Direct Instruction Peer Tutoring was highly effective with all participants increasing their accuracy and fluency of basic facts and maintaining mastery across four levels. Routine, repeated practice, immediate feedback, and individualized support contributed to this study’s success.

 
47. The Effects of a Token Economy System on the Talk-Out Levels by Two Middle School Students With Disabilities in a Self-Contained Classroom
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
JENNIFER M NEYMAN (Gonzaga University), Catherine Martin (Gonzaga University), Amy Hansen (Gonzaga University), Lucille Holloway (Gonzaga University)
Discussant: Kellie P. Goldberg (Bancroft)
Abstract:

This study’s purpose was to evaluate the effects of a Token Economy on decreasing the number of talk-outs by two 14-year-old middle school students in a self-contained classroom. One participant had an intellectual disability, and the other had ADHD. Both displayed high rates of talk-outs that disrupted the classroom and prevented learning. Within a reversal design, an event recording data system added the number of talk-outs during a 10-minute session. For intervention, the Token Economy system began with goal setting that session’s talk-out maximum number. Without interrupting the class, the researchers recorded each participant’s talk-outs for ten minutes. To earn a star, the session’s talk-out total had to be less than the goal specified at the beginning of the session. For every three stars earned, the participant had a choice to exchange his stars for one of five preferred items. If the session goal was not met, the participant did not earn a star. For both participants, high rates of talk-outs during baseline decreased to near zero levels during intervention. The Token Economy intervention proved successful in the classroom setting due to goal setting, explicit rules, contingent feedback, student voice, and choice of reinforcers.

 
 

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