Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

Event Details


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Symposium #522
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Staff Training of Special Topics: Assent, Menstrual Care, and Pyramidal Training
Monday, May 27, 2024
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Downtown, Level 3, Liberty Ballroom Salon BC
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Translational
Chair: Jacqueline J. Weber (Endicott College)
CE Instructor: Stephanie Bendush, B.A.
Abstract:

Staff training is an important component of behavior analytic service provision. Behavior analysts are responsible for training supervisees to implement programming with a high level of integrity. Pyramidal training is an efficient, cost effective training program in which expert trainers train an initial cohort and then those in the initial cohort become trainers for other staff (Erath et al., 2020; Lerman et al, 2019). This process can be helpful in residential settings with high turnover. Behavior analysts may also need to train staff to implement and collect data on skills that require special considerations, for example: operational definitions for assent provision and withdrawal, and intimate care routines (i.e. feminine care). When teaching intimate care skills, special considerations should be made to prioritize assent, the dignity of the learner, and skill generalization in the natural environment. This presentation will review pyramidal training in a residential setting, teaching staff to write operational definitions and collect data on assent behaviors, and review research that teaches intimate and personal care.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Assent, Menstrual Care/Hygiene, Pyramidal Training, Staff Training
Target Audience:

Intermediate - Prerequisite skills include understanding on behavioral skills training (BST), writing operational definitions and understanding of data collection systems, and fluency with the updated ethics code.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe pyramidal training approaches and applications to mand training; (2) identify potential assent-behaviors and data collection systems; (3) describe ways that interventions can be created to protect the dignity of learners when teaching intimate care skills.
 
Pyramidal Training of a Manding Program in a Residential Setting
(Service Delivery)
SAMANTHA VOLPE (Endicott College ), Bridget Keough (Family Focused ABA )
Abstract: Staff training and the ability to implement behavior intervention plans with high integrity is a basic foundation of applied behavior analytic programming. Training staff who work in a residential setting poses unique challenges, and training those who work with an adult population, where there are often less resources available, can be especially challenging. One potential solution to this challenge is the use of pyramidal training. Pyramidal training is an efficient, cost effective training program in which expert trainers train an initial cohort and then those in the initial cohort become trainers for other staff (Erath et al., 2020; Lerman et al, 2019). This training methodology is especially effective for group home programs where staff turnover is generally high (Schlosser et al., 2006). In the current study, the lead behavior technicians were trained on a manding program using behavioral skills training. Once each of the lead behavior technicians were trained to competency, they became the trainers for the remaining staff. All three lead behavior technicians were able to effectively train the next cohort of staff, and at the end of training all staff were able to maintain mastery criteria during maintenance checks.
 
Idiosyncratic Assent Behaviors: Definition and Measurement
(Service Delivery)
STEPHANIE BENDUSH (Endicott College), Jill Harper (Melmark New England, Endicott College)
Abstract: With the addition of “assent” to the BACB Ethics Code (2020) and a literature review by Morris et al., (2021) on the topic of assent in behavior analytic research, there has been a surge of research and clinical interest in assent. Publications have also begun to emerge outlining the concept of assent (Abdel et al., 2023; Breaux & Smith, 2023; Flowers & Dawes, 2023). The next step in the research to practice transition is producing data driven research on assent-based clinical practice strategies. This presentation will provide clinicians with resources and strategies to identify their clients’ idiosyncratic assent provision and withdrawal behaviors, generate operational definitions, and identify appropriate measurement systems. By generating definitions and data collection systems, clinicians can measure their clients’ assent provision and withdrawal behaviors and make data-based decisions in program modifications. By training staff to define and measure these skills, staff can support client dignity, autonomy, and self-advocacy.
 
Guidelines for Practitioners and Staff Implementing Menstrual Care and Other Intimate Care Routines
(Service Delivery)
SARAH VEAZEY KRISTIANSEN (Endicott College)
Abstract: Implementing intimate care routines, such as teaching the skills to maintain menstrual hygiene or showering, can be a daunting task for clinicians and interventionists given the personal nature of the skill (Oshinski et al., 2022). When teaching intimate care skills, special considerations should be made to prioritize assent, the dignity of the learner, and implementing programming that teaches with naturally maintaining variables in mind. This presentation will summarize research that has taught intimate and personal care skills to autistic individuals as well as individuals with developmental disabilities. Common themes surrounding strategies that researchers have used to promote dignity and generalization will be highlighted (Cicero, 2019; Gerhardt et al., 2022; McLay et al., 2021; Sala et al., 2019). These strategies will be summarized as guidelines for practitioners and interventionists who are hoping to begin teaching this type of skill to clients. A demonstration of how a practitioner could apply these guidelines to teaching menstrual care skills will be provided.
 

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