Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

Event Details


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Symposium #405
CE Offered: BACB
Developments in Credentialing of Behavior Analysts
Monday, May 27, 2024
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center, 200 Level, 203 AB
Area: PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Susan Wilczynski (Ball State University)
Discussant: Grant Gautreaux (Nicholls State University)
CE Instructor: Gordon Bourland, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The symposium addresses recent developments related to behavior analyst credentialing. One presentation addresses the educational and supervised experience requirements for behavior analyst credentialing, comparing the varying requirements of certifying organizations. A second presentation addresses opposition to behavior analyst licensure in US states. In one state, interaction of behavior analysts and licensure opponents contributed to establishment of a program of post-certification mentorship of behavior analysts that can serve as a method for states to provide continuing oversight and supervision post certification. The third presentation addresses the New York State behavior analyst licensure law. The original law created unprecedented requirements (e.g., coursework and supervision requirements differing from the BACB's, Licensed Behavior Analysts working only with Autistic individuals, coursework not done in New York not accepted). The law has changed and come more into line with those elsewhere. How and why this happened will be traced, emphasizing the roles of professionals and parent advocates. The final presentation examines the development, changes, and future directions in the practice of behavior analysis both in the US and other countries. Histories of professions indicate that across years they typically change, some ceasing to exist. Implications of such changes for behavior analysis as a profession discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Intermediate Knowledge of the general nature of behavior analysis as a profession and of common behavior analyst credentialing criteria

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be state: (1) Common criteria for behavior analyst credentialing (e.g., licensure); (2) differences in education and supervised experience of different certification organizations; (3) at least one source of opposition to behavior analyst licensure; (4) some constructive responses to opposition to behavior analyst licensure related to the required number of hours of supervised experience; (5) components of a model of post-certification mentorship for behavior analysts; (6) at least 2 differences of requirements original behavior analyst licensure in New York from common licensure laws; (7) possible contribution of parent advocates to public policy related to behavior analysts; (8) at least 2 ways that professions often change over time; (10) at least 2 possible future challenges to behavior analysis as a profession.
 
Navigating the Educational Landscape for Various Credentials in Behavior Analysis
SHERRY L. SERDIKOFF (Savannah State University)
Abstract: As the profession of behavior analysis matures and the demand for behavior analytic services continues to rise, understanding the educational prerequisites for various credentials is key for our field. I will provide a brief history of the academic requirements associated with the different credentials offered by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB), as well as review emerging pathways to meeting the current BACB standards, including academic programs that are accredited or recognized by the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and other organizations. These will be compared with the educational requirements needed to obtain credentials related to behavior analysis that are offered by other agencies and will be evaluated in the context of their relationship to US licensure requirements and how the academic requirements intersect with required supervised experience. The aim of this presentation is to provide useful information for those seeking to understand the evolving educational landscape in behavior analysis and guide the development of robust academic training programs to support the next generation of behavior analysts.
 

Towards Post Certification Mentorship in States With Applied Behavior Analysis Licensure

JOHN M. GUERCIO (Benchmark Human Services)
Abstract:

Many of those involved in the legislative process as it pertains to Behavior Analyst licensure have likely run into opposition from opposing fields or disciplines. This talk will focus on a primary area of opposition to portion of some common behavior analyst licensure requirements. Specifically, opposition has arisen from members of other professions the licensure requirements for which typically involve considerably more hours of supervised experience for independent practice than the supervised experience requirement included in BACB certification requirements and most state behavior analyst licensure requirements. In one state, interaction of behavior analysts and licensure opponents contributed to establishment of a program of post-certification mentorship of behavior analysts that can serve as a method for states to provide continuing oversight and supervision post certification. The talk will look at how some of these disputes have been settled in different states and provide an outline for a mentorship program that can serve as a method for some states to provide continuing oversight and supervision post certification.

 
Sausage Making and the Evolution of the New York State Behavior Analyst Licensing Law
BOBBY NEWMAN (Proud Moments), Bobbi Rogers (Proud Moments ABA)
Abstract: The New York State licensing for behavior analysts came into being as a direct result of language contained in New York state's insurance law mandating ABA coverage for individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. New York, however, created a unique licensing law that created several unprecedented conditions (e.g., its own coursework requirements that differed from the BACB's, a scope restriction that only allowed LBAs to work with individuals diagnosed with ASD, supervision experience rules that differed from the BACB, etc.). Individuals who had been BCBAs for decades were kept from practicing in New York or were told they would need to do their experience requirements all over again and take extra courses in order to become licensed. Coursework from academic programs accepted everywhere else in the country were not accepted in New York. This led to a decrease in the number of LBAs in the state when other states were experiencing increases, and paperwork delays of well over a year for processing were commonly reported. Over time, the law changed and has come more into line with the rest of the country. How and why this happened will be traced, with an emphasis on the roles professionals and parent advocates played.
 
Quo Vadis, Profession of Behavior Analysis?
GORDON BOURLAND (Trinity Behavioral Associates), Ivana Trellova (University of Presov, Presov, Slovakia), Noor Younus Syed (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College), John Walter Scibak (Retired, Massachusetts House of Representatives)
Abstract: Given that behavior analysts now can be licensed in 37 states in the US and in at least 1 other nation, as well as registered in multiple other nations, behavior analysis is becoming formally recognized and well established as a profession. This paper examines the development, changes, and future directions in the practice of behavior analysis both in the US and as a possible profession in countries where behavior analysis is not yet as established as it is in the USA. Histories of professions indicate that across years professions typically change (e.g., regarding education and training requirements, credentialing criteria, scope of practice, member obligations, ethics expectations, alliances, opposition, division). Additionally, some professions cease to exist, often seemingly robust ones. Examples of changes in professions in the last 150 years will be reviewed and possible implications for behavior analysis as a profession discussed. The impact of current opposition to behavior analysis will be explored. Possible impact on behavior analysis as a profession of current and anticipated social, philosophical, and economic trends also will be considered.
 

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