Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

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Symposium #108
CE Offered: BACB
Current Research in Precision Teaching: Theoretical Implications and Practical Applications in Clinical and Educational Settings
Saturday, May 25, 2024
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Downtown, Level 5, Grand Ballroom Salon E
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Martin Kozloff (NCABA)
CE Instructor: James Stocker, Ph.D.
Abstract: Precision Teaching represents a measurement and decision-making system that maximizes the development of academic, functional, and socially significant behaviors. The standard celeration chart serves as the primary tool for visual analysis and yields quantifiable outcomes to evaluate behavioral fluency. The present symposium examines current research in precision teaching with an emphasis on the theoretical implications and practical applications that carry a significant impact in clinical and educational settings. The individual presentations cover topics such as assessing how graph type influences behavior analysts' evaluations and decision-making, identifying frequency aims for daily living skills that signify behavioral fluency in autistic individuals and individuals with developmental disabilities, and the application of a packaged reading intervention using a dosage approach to optimize instructional efficiency and efficacy in an urban school setting. Attendees of the symposium can expect a concise review of the methodology and results associated with each research contribution as well as recommendations for future research and implications for practitioners.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Pre-requisite skills include having a basic understanding of measurement, data display, and interpretation as outlined in the BCBA Task List (5th edition).
Learning Objectives: 1. Given simulated data in various graph formats, behavior analysts will evaluate trend magnitude with at least 90% agreement compared to expert consensus, demonstrating the ability to interpret trends based on graph type accurately; 2. After reviewing standard rules for interpreting trends using linear versus ratio graphs, behavior analysts will select appropriate treatment changes with 95% accuracy according to graph-based decision rules, demonstrating skill in using visual data to guide clinical decision-making; 3. Given a visual display and associated table depicting data from a multiple probe design study, behavior analysts will identify the level and level multiplier with 90% accuracy; 4. Given a visual display and associated table depicting data from a multiple probe design study, behavior analysts will identify celeration and celeration multiplier with 90% accuracy; 5. Describe critical learning outcomes associated with behavioral fluency; 6. Describe the difference between accuracy and behavioral fluency; 7. Explain the use of frequency aims and the importance to determine aims for daily living skills..
 
Slope Identification and Decision Making: A Comparison of Linear and Ratio Graphs
(Theory)
JAMES STOCKER (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Rick M. Kubina (Penn State)
Abstract: Applied behavior analysts have traditionally used visual analysis of graphic data displays to determine functional relations between variables and guide treatment implementation. This study assessed how graph type influences behavior analysts' evaluations of trend magnitude, treatment decisions based on trend changes, and confidence in decision-making. Fifty-one behavior analysts examined simulated data presented on linear graphs with equal-interval scales and ratio-scaled graphs (i.e., multiply/divide or logarithmic vertical axis) with numeric celeration indicators. Standard rules for interpreting trends accompanied each graph. Results showed significantly higher agreement on trend magnitude evaluations and treatment decisions and higher confidence levels when using ratio graphs. Moreover, decision-making was most efficient with ratio charts and a celeration value. These findings have implications for research and practice regarding the influence of graph type on data interpretation and decision-making.Given simulated data in various graph formats, behavior analysts will evaluate trend magnitude with at least 90% agreement compared to expert consensus, demonstrating the ability to interpret trends based on graph type accurately.
 

An Exploration of Frequency Aims for Daily Living Skills

(Applied Research)
Jennifer Wertalik (Georgia Southern University), Andrew Bulla (Georgia Southern University - Armstrong ), Leah Yakabovits (Georgia Southern University), MADISEN DUKE (Georgia Southern University)
Abstract:

For autistic individuals and individuals with developmental disabilities, acquiring daily living skills (DLS) represents a critical component in establishing independence as they transition into adulthood. Researchers have suggested that designing instructional programming towards behavioral fluency, can help increase and maintain skills for individuals in these populations beyond traditional accuracy criteria. A frequency aim constitutes a level of performance that reliably predicts critical outcomes (e.g., retention, application) associated with behavioral fluency. Although frequency aims exist for academic skills, no research has identified the frequency aims needed to reach behavioral fluency for DLS. The present project sought to explore the frequency aims needed to reach behavioral fluency for a variety of DLS. Sixty college-aged participants performed 12 different tasks while researchers collected data on the movement cycles observed and the amount of time required to complete each task. We will present results from the project as well as discuss implications for practice.

 

Effects of Explicit Decoding Plus Frequency Building for Consonant-Vowel-Consonant Word Reading in a Tier 3 Urban Elementary Setting

(Applied Research)
MARY ASHLEY BURCH (University of North Carolina Wilmington), James Stocker (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Martin Kozloff (NCABA)
Abstract:

A number of challenges exist when a disproportionate number of students concentrated in urban schools require the highest levels of academic support yet have inequitable access to evidence based interventions within multi tiered systems of support. The present investigation examined the effects of an explicit decoding plus frequency building intervention on consonant vowel consonant word reading fluency. Participants included three second-grade students receiving Tier 3 academic support at an urban public school in the southeastern United States. Using a dosage approach, the interventionists applied the intervention 5 to 8 minutes per day, over 8 to 9 days per word list. Results indicate a significant increase in words correct per minute and decrease in words incorrect per minute on the three words lists, curriculum-based assessments, and curriculum-based measurements. The session will include a statistical analysis using the standard celeration chart, implications for research and practice, and shared protocols for participant application in the field.

 

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