Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

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Poster Session #484F
CSS Monday Poster Session
Monday, May 27, 2024
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Convention Center, 200 Level, Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Dayna Beddick (University of West Florida)
56. Behavioral Economics and Results of a Survey of Corruption and Government Satisfaction in Mexico
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
MARIA ELENA ELENA RODRIGUEZ PEREZ (University of Guadalajara), Ivan Arciniega (Universidad de Guadalajara )
Discussant: Stephen E. Eversole (Behavior Development Solutions, LLC)
Abstract:

In Mexico, the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI) carries out a survey every two years on the quality and impact of government work (ENCIG: “Encuesta Nacional de Calidad e Impacto Gubernamental”). This survey investigates corrupt practices and satisfaction with services provided by the government. Although INEGI publishes a report, data is available to encourage analysis from different disciplines. In this work, principles of behavioral economics were used to offer a plausible explanation for the survey responses. For example, ENCIG 2021 data (answered by 39,930 residents across the country) showed that people reported different frequencies of corrupt acts depending on who would be involved in the report. When the corruption report included their participation, they reported less frequency. Results also suggested that belief in corruption in government processes is learned by reference (“hearing from someone else”) and not by direct experience. This is consistent with the assumption that individuals tend to find justifications for their dishonest actions. The analyzes performed not only provide empirical evidence for behavioral approaches to corruption, but can also help behavioral researchers design more ecological tasks to assess corruption. For example, interviewees' reports of trust in different social institutions would determine options used in a task.

 
Diversity submission 57. An Exploratory Survey of Latinidad in Behavior Analysis
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
SOFIA URDANETA VARGAS (University of Florida), Corina Jimenez-Gomez (University of Florida), Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake), Denice Rios Mojica (California State University, Los Angeles)
Discussant: Dayna Beddick (University of West Florida)
Abstract: Latinos make up 18.9% of the US population and constitute a similar proportion of those working in the field of behavior analysis. However, little is known about their cultural values and how individuals approach their work. Because behavior analysts work closely with students and clients, their learning history and cultural values likely influence their behavior as mentors, supervisors, researchers, and clinicians (Beaulieu & Jimenez-Gomez, 2022). The purpose of this project was to survey the demographics, activities, roles and values of Latino behavior analysts through established instruments to better understand their cultural background. A Qualtrics survey was shared via social media and professional listservs. Eighty-six Latino individuals completed the survey. Demographic data indicated that participants tended to be women under the age of 45, who identified as White or “other” race (e.g., mixed, Mestiza) with light skin, of middle-class social positioning. More than half of the participants were born in the U.S., of whom approximately two thirds were second generation Latinos. This poster will summarize the results of the survey and implications for future research and service delivery. This work aims to promote cultural responsiveness to mitigate service barriers within Latino families and communities, such as language and personal understanding of cultural variables.
 
Diversity submission 58. Focus Groups to Culturally Tailor Digital Contingency Management for LGBTQ+ Smokers
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
CASSANDRA O'HARA (University of Florida ), Lauren Lightner (University of Florida), Isabella Ingrassia (University of Florida ), Jesse Dallery (University of Florida)
Discussant: Stephen E. Eversole (Behavior Development Solutions, LLC)
Abstract: Despite significant decreases in smoking prevalence during the last 50 years, smoking rates remain high for LGBTQ+ people compared to their non-LGBTQ+ peers (Buchting et al., 2017; Jamal et al., 2018; CDC, 2022). In addition, LGBTQ+ people have been largely excluded from research on smoking cessation interventions (Baskerville et al., 2017; Lee et al., 2014). Cultural tailoring of an evidence-based intervention is one method for addressing health inequities and increasing acceptability of the intervention (Butler et al., 2016; Chin et al., 2007; Torres-Ruiz et al., 2018). Contingency management (CM) is one of the most effective treatments for producing drug abstinence (Davis et al., 2016; Higgins et al., 2008). Digital CM is a promising extension of traditional CM that has been shown to decreases barriers while maintaining efficacy (Dallery et al., 2019). Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to identify what, why, when, and how to tailor the delivery of digital CM with LGBTQ+ people. We conducted three focus groups, including two groups with LGBTQ+ current or former smokers and one group with CM or behavior analytic experts. Data were analyzed using independent thematic analysis of de-identified focus group transcripts. Identified themes included the need for tailoring, importance of community support, and adding clear symbols of inclusion (e.g., rainbow flag) to materials. Results suggest that tailoring has promise as a way to reduce inequities in access to an evidence-based behavioral treatment for smoking cessation.
 
59. Evaluating the Effects of Advertising on Hypothetical Consumer Behavior Given Climate Anxiety Using Relational Density Theory
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
RYAN MOSER (Missouri State University), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Lauren Rose Hutchison (Missouri State University )
Discussant: Dayna Beddick (University of West Florida)
Abstract:

nfluencing purchasing patterns of individuals can exert bottom-up economic pressure on corporations and investors to develop eco-friendly alternatives to existing products. The current study extends previous work in Young & McCoy (2016), Matthews et al (in press), and Hutchenson et al (2023), by evaluating and analyzing consumer choices of chocolate bars in attempts to increase sustainable consumption using Relational Density Theory (RDT). Before the study, participants were randomly split into four groups for stimuli training (Positive, Negative, Mixed, and Control). In the task they will be presented with pairwise combinations of images of chocolate bars with various advertising features. They will then be asked to make hypothetical purchasing selections. Following the task, each group will receive relational training using stimuli with differing functions, such as approach or avoid functions. Participants will then retake the same computerized task. Participants will also complete pre and post-test of assessments such as the climate anxiety questionnaire. Results have implications for applications of how climate anxiety can predict pro-environmental behavior. Discussion will highlight potential limitations, future research, and highlight the importance of pro-environmental behavior.

 
60. Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions - Incidental Teaching
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
VICTORIA ARAGON (University of Illinois Chicago )
Discussant: Stephen E. Eversole (Behavior Development Solutions, LLC)
Abstract:

Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions (NDBI) consists of behavioral and developmental interventions that are implemented in a natural setting to teach new skills and decrease challenging behaviors (e.g. aggression, flopping, screaming). This term was developed by Dr. Laura Schreibman in 2015 as a way to categorize interventions that share the same principles and methods. Previous research has proven Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions to be an effective and successful model of intervention for increasing motivation, skill acquisition, and appropriate behaviors. Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions. In this systematic review we summarized the research on one Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions - incidental teaching. The purpose of this review was to (a) evaluate the extent to which incidental teaching has been evaluated in the literature, (b) examine the characteristics of participants included in incidental teaching studies, and (c) evaluate the extent to which generalization has been studied in the incidental teaching research. In this presentation we'll discuss major findings and implications for research and practice.

 
61. Reducing Unnecessary X-Rays for Knee Arthrosis - A Single Case Design Study
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
SARA INGVARSSON (Karolinska Institutet ), Ingunn Sandaker (Oslo Metropolitan University/ OsloMet), Per Nilsen (Linköping University ), Henna Hasson (Karolinska Institutet; Center for Epidemiology and Community Medicine), Hanna Augustsson (Karolinska Institutet; Center for Epidemiology and Community Medicine), Ulrica von Thiele (Mälardalen University)
Discussant: Dayna Beddick (University of West Florida)
Abstract:

The research field Implementation science has traditionally focused on the implementation of evidence-based practices, but the field has increasingly recognized the importance of addressing de-implementation (i.e., the process of reducing low-value care). Most studies on de-implementation strategies have used a combination of strategies without addressing factors that sustain the use of LVC and there is a lack of information about which strategies are most effective and what mechanisms of change might underlie these strategies. Applied behavior analysis is an approach that could be a potential method to gain insights into the mechanisms of de-implementation strategies to reduce LVC. Three research questions are addressed in this study: (1) What contingencies (three-term contingencies or rule governing behavior) related to the use of LVC can be found in a local context and what strategies can be developed based on an analysis of these contingencies? (2) Do these strategies change targeted behaviors? (3) How do the participants describe the strategies’ contingencies and the feasibility of the applied behavior analysis approach? Method In this study, we used an applied behaviors analysis to analyze contingencies that maintain behaviors related to a chosen LVC, the unnecessary use of X-rays for knee arthrosis within a primary care center. Based on this analysis, strategies were developed and evaluated using a single-case design and a qualitative analysis of interview data. Results Two strategies were developed: a lecture and feedback meetings. The results from the single-case data were inconclusive but some of the findings may indicate a behavior change in the expected direction. Such a conclusion is supported by interview data showing that participants perceived an effect in response to both strategies. Conclusion The findings illustrate how applied behavior analysis can be used to analyze contingencies related to the use of LVC and to design strategies for de-implementation. It also shows an effect of the targeted behaviors even though the quantitative results are inconclusive. The strategies used in this study could be further improved to target the contingencies better by structuring the feedback meetings better and including more precise feedback.

 
62. Success Markers Among Survivors of Human Trafficking: A Preliminary Housing Program Evaluation
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
MARISSA DEL VECCHIO (University of South Florida ), Arturo Garcia (University of South Florida), Shelly Wagers (University of South Florida ), Kaleigh Cernosek (University of South Florida), Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida), Marqueline Cenatus (University of South Florida)
Discussant: Stephen E. Eversole (Behavior Development Solutions, LLC)
Abstract:

Human trafficking (HT) programs often lack well-defined goals, fail to record data directly from survivors and do not assess enhancements to survivors’ quality of life (Krieger et al., 2022). To address the lack of research surrounding effective program evaluations, this project aimed to evaluate an HT housing program in southern Florida guided by recommendations from Macy et al. (2022). A retrospective analysis of 63 case files was conducted to evaluate the level to which wrap-around service provision resulted in successful completion of the program. Successful completion of the program required that survivors demonstrated effective finance management and were able to acquire and maintain housing and employment. Following preliminary data analysis for six case files that met these markers for success, data show that survivors obtained employment and housing within an average of 2 months of starting the program, received six service referrals and completed the program within an average of 27 months. This study will add to the limited literature on trauma-informed approaches for providing continuity of care services to this population.

 
Sustainability submission 63. Using Hypothetical Purchase Tasks to Investigate Demand for Beef and Plant-Based Foods and Cross-Price Elasticity
Area: CSS; Domain: Basic Research
CYNTHIA J. PIETRAS (Western Michigan University)
Discussant: Dayna Beddick (University of West Florida)
Abstract: Livestock contributes significantly to greenhouse-gas emissions and deforestation, and is a contributor to climate change. Increasing consumption of plant-based foods is a simple method to reduce these environmental impacts. Price structures may shift choices towards plant-based foods. The present study sought to investigate the effects of price on consumption of beef and plant burgers, and evaluate the cross-price elasticity of plant-based burgers (change in demand when the price of plant-burgers is fixed but price of beef burgers increase). Using a hypothetical purchase task, Mturk participants who reported consuming beef (current n=48) rated the probability of purchasing a beef burger and a plant burger across 17 prices ($0.01-$85), independently. Next, the price of a concurrently-available plant-based burger was fixed ($4.25) while the price of the beef burger was varied ($4.25, $5.50, $8.50, $11.25, $17.00). Preliminary data show that demand for beef and plant burgers decreased as a function of price. The availability of plant-based burgers did not appear to affect demand for beef-burgers. Demand for plant-based burgers increased only slightly with increasing beef-burger prices. However, demand curves showed greater consumption of the plant-burger at beef-burger prices exceeding $10. This suggests that price manipulations may shift choice toward plant-based options.
 
 

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