Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

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Poster Session #292D
EDC Sunday Poster Session
Sunday, May 26, 2024
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Convention Center, 200 Level, Exhibit Hall A
Chair: May Chriseline Beaubrun (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
36. Performance Feedback, Pyramidal Training and Behavioral Skills Training: Increasing Treatment Integrity of Staff’s and Caregivers' Use of Function-Based Interventions
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
Veronica DePinto (Brett DiNovi and Associates), HEATHER FRANCISCO (Brett DiNovi ), Katelynn Wiamer (Brett DiNovi and Associates), Brianna Snyder (Brett DiNovi and Associates)
Discussant: May Chriseline Beaubrun (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
Abstract:

Performance feedback (PF) (Solomon, Klein, Politico, 2011) has become popular in the school-based and home-based literature as a method to increase the treatment integrity of prescribed interventions. The extracted and aggregated data from single-case studies that used PF, Pyramidal Training and Behavioral Skills Training in various treatment settings, show increased integrity of staff’s and caregivers' use of function-based interventions. Results suggest PF and other evidence based training practices are moderately effective at increasing integrity after a new strategy or intervention has been introduced, curbing a general tendency for declining integrity following skill training. The type of skill for which staff received training and the setting of the training moderated the effect. Important questions remain, however, regarding the use of training strategies in schools and other treatment settings and the most effective method for its implementation. Some other topics explored in this panel will include: A Review of the Pyramidal Training Approach for Practitioners Working with Individuals with Disabilities (Andzik, Cannella-Malone, 2017) Evaluating Behavioral Skills Training as an Evidence-Based Practice When Training Parents to Intervene with Their Children (Schaefer, Andzik, 2021) Demonstrating Technical Adequacy of the Functional Assessment Checklist: Teachers and Staff (FACTS) FBA Interview Measure (McIntosh, Borgmeier, Anderson, Horner, Rodriguez, Tobin 2008) Using School-Wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports: Fidelity of Tier 1 Implementation in 117 Dutch Schools (Nelen, Blonk, Scholte, Denessen, 2020) Increasing In-Service Teacher Implementation of Classroom Management Practices Through Consultation, Implementation Planning, and Participant Modeling (Sanetti, Williamson, Long, Kratochwill, 2018) Improving a Family’s Overall Quality of Life Through Parent Training in Pivotal Response Treatment (Buckley, Ente, Ruef, 2014) Implementing the Application of a Three-Tier Model of Intervention to Parent Training (Phaneuf, McIntyre, 2011) Including Parent Training in the Early Childhood Special Education Curriculum for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders (Ingersoll, Dvortcsak, 2003) Each panelist will provide her perspective on how to navigate issues and use evidence-based practices (EBP) in her respective organization. Panelists are from Brett DiNovi and Associates and Positive Pathways Behavior Services.

 
37. An Evaluation of an Academic-Based Level System
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
RITA MARIE DRUFFNER (Mississippi State University), Kayla BATES-BRANTLEY (Mississippi State University)
Discussant: Micah Hope (University of North Texas and Endicott College)
Abstract: Level systems are intervention packages where a group or individual receives varying degrees of reinforcement based on responding (Cihon et al., 2019; Hagopian et al., 2002). The literature on level systems has been focused on the implementation of group- or individual-based behavioral intervention seeking to decrease socially maladaptive behavior while increasing socially appropriate behaviors. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a level system as a component of a reading intervention package. The participants were two individuals referred by their parents for additional academic support in reading and math. The level system provided tiered reinforcement based on academic performance. The results of a multielement comparison across academic interventions suggest the level system increased academic performance in reading. A subsequent component analysis suggests the level system alone was effective to increase academic performance in reading. The current combination of reading intervention and the level system provides a preliminary demonstrated of how to address skill and motivational deficits to increase nonsense word reading fluency.
 
38. Evaluating the Effects of an Independent Group Contingency on Disruptive Behavior and Active Engagement Behavior Within the Classroom
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CALLIE DEMARIA (Drexel University), Amanda L. Lannie (Drexel University)
Discussant: May Chriseline Beaubrun (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
Abstract:

Teachers are often searching out classroom management strategies to improve student behavior in the classroom. This study sought to enhance an existing group contingency that was proving to be ineffective in reducing disruptive behavior in a fourth/fifth grade special education classroom. The researcher utilized an ABAB design to investigate the effectiveness of an independent group contingency on student behavior during one academic period per day in a classroom with eight students with multiple disabilities. The group contingency was designed by adding a token to the existing group contingency paired with feedback delivered on a 3-min fixed time schedule. Students who met the criterion received reinforcement. The findings revealed that disruptive behavior decreased to a mean 6% during the most difficult teaching time within the classroom while active engagement behavior increased to a mean 82%. The teacher’s ratings on a treatment acceptability survey indicated the teacher would continue to utilize the system and recommend it to others. The study showed that an already established classroom intervention could be strengthened to improve outcomes while also maintaining the feasibility of the intervention so that the teacher is able to execute on their own.

 
39. Effects of Instruction Type and Feedback Style on Performance and Preference While Learning Clinical Skills
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
LOGAN D ZUPKO (Northern Michigan University), Darian Grear (Northern Michigan University), Jen Jones (Northern Michigan University), Forrest Toegel (Northern Michigan University), Cory Toegel (Northern Michigan University)
Discussant: Micah Hope (University of North Texas and Endicott College)
Abstract:

Delivering feedback is an important component in teaching new skills. Feedback provides information about which steps were completed correctly and how to improve steps that were incorrect. We evaluated the effectiveness of and preference for two feedback types across two levels of instruction. Participants attended a two-phase laboratory session in which they learned clinical tasks. During Phase 1, participants learned two tasks in an alternating order. After performing each task, the experimenter provided either narrative or numerical feedback. Narrative feedback involved providing qualitative statements whereas numerical feedback involved providing quantitative summaries. The task order and pairing of feedback with each task was counterbalanced across participants. During Phase 2, participants learned a third task and demonstrated their feedback preference by choosing the feedback type over 5 trials. Throughout the session, participants received either minimal instructions (n=10) or enhanced instructions (n=10) on all of the tasks. The results showed that most participants preferred the narrative feedback, regardless of instruction type. This preference was most evident in the first trial of the choice procedure. No differences were found in performance across feedback or instruction type. This research provides insights into effective and preferred strategies to facilitate training of common clinical tasks.

 
40. Evaluating Video Analysis as Professional Development for Educators: A Meta-Analysis of Group Design Studies
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Jennifer S. Lauriello (Lehigh University), KRISTI MORIN (Lehigh University), Alyssa Blasko (Lehigh University), Demi Rohlfing (Lehigh University), Elise Settanni (Lehigh University), Saunja Vicari (Lehigh University)
Discussant: May Chriseline Beaubrun (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
Abstract:

Professional development (PD) is crucial for both novice and established teachers, enhancing their teaching practices to support optimal student outcomes. Video analysis is a form of PD involving self-reflection through watching recorded teaching sessions. Reviews of the single-case literature have identified video analysis as highly effective, but similar synthesis of the group design literature has not occurred. Group-design research typically has smaller effect sizes and different outcome measures than single-case research. The purpose of this study is to use meta-analytic methods to investigate the effectiveness of video analysis on the instructional practices of educators within group design research. We aim to examine similarities and differences between single-case and group design research, exploring whether the positive effects found for single-case research are replicated in the group design literature. Meta-regression analyses will assess the differential effects of publication type, methodological quality, participant characteristics (e.g., role, education level, experience level, age), and instructional characteristics (e.g., group size, type of instruction, grade level, setting) on the effectiveness of video analysis. The outcomes of this study may inform the development of future PD for educators. Implications for future research and practice will be discussed.

 
41. Evaluating Shifts in Worldview for Students Engaged With Science of the Noosphere Master Class Through Relational Density Theory
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
AMANDA MIDDLETON (Missouri State University), Lauren Rose Hutchison (Missouri State University ), Sage Gibbons (Prosocial World), David Sloan Wilson (Binghamton University), Beth Hawkins (Prosocial World), Ellen Rigsby (St. Mary's College of California), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Dana Paliliunas (Missouri State University)
Discussant: Micah Hope (University of North Texas and Endicott College)
Abstract:

The Noosphere (in comparison to the geosphere and the biosphere) describes the evolution of interconnected thought and communication occurring at a global level within the human species occasioned by advances in modern technologies. A Master class was developed to engage participants in critical discussion around the Science of the Noosphere and advances in Relational Frame Theory, including Relational Density Theory, have the potential to evaluate the symbolic relations of participants in response to the class material. The present study sought to assess shifts in worldview of participants in the class by relating stimuli associated with divergent worldviews and mapped using the multidimensional scaling procedure. Results showed two distinct relational clusters prior-to the class that persisted at the end of the class, including an optimistic view of an interconnected and cooperative world that is diverse (including biodiversity), and a pessimistic view of an independent and competitive world. Participants' views of society today become more optimistic throughout the course, corresponding with naturalistic language collected throughout the course. Relations distance also decreased between participants’ worldviews and their perspective on society 100 years from now, speaking to the human potential to consider, and therefore to potential shape, our future.

 
42. Is Noncontingent Reinforcement Alone Enough to Reduce Attention Seeking Noncompliant Behaviors?
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
PIK WAH LAM-CHESNUT (University of Central Missouri)
Discussant: May Chriseline Beaubrun (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
Abstract: This poster presents the intervention results of using Noncontingent Reinforcement (NCR) alone to reduce noncompliant behaviors of a 2nd-grade student diagnosed with ADHD. Noncompliant was defined as any behaviors that did not match with teacher’s instruction and/or expectation. Behavior assessment results identified teacher attention as the maintaining consequences of the behavior. The student engaged in noncompliant behaviors on an average of 77% of the intervals during baseline with an occurrence every 3-5 minutes. The teacher was first trained to provide attention on a variable interval schedule of 2 minutes. Teacher used the clock in the classroom to loosely keep track of time. During the first phase of the intervention, reminders to provide attention were given if no attention was delivered at the 3 minutes mark. This reminder was faded in phase 2 when the teacher reported comfort without the reminder and achieved mastery criterion for 3 consecutive sessions. Maintenance check was conducted about once a week until the end of the semester. Results suggested that NCR alone was sufficient in reducing noncompliant behaviors and increasing compliant behaviors. However, the effects were mild at the beginning of the intervention producing a slow but gradual change of the behavior.
 
43. Transforming Classroom Dynamics: An Examination of Baseline Classroom Conditions Across a Range of Classroom Settings in Elementary Schools
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CHANDLER OLIVIA PEDERSON (University of Nebraska Medical Center), Alexis Westercamp (University of Nebraska Medical Center - Munroe-Meyer Institute), Daphne Snyder (University of Nebraska Medical Center - Munroe-Meyer Institute), Brenda J. Bassingthwaite (Munroe-Meyer Institute; University of Nebraska Medical Center), Alexandria Robers (University of Nebraska Medical Center - Munroe-Meyer Institute), Jessie Kaye Weber (University of Nebraska Medical Center - Munroe-Meyer Institute), Krystal Bauman (University of Nebraska Medical Center - Munroe-Meyer Institute), Sarah Hermann (University of Nebraska Medical Center - Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Discussant: Micah Hope (University of North Texas and Endicott College)
Abstract: Imagine a classroom where every teacher-student interaction is a catalyst for growth and learning. This can be achieved through careful observation and class-wide intervention on baseline classroom conditions (Kestner et al., 2019). By assessing classroom variables, we ensure a supportive environment that fosters appropriate behavior and high academic performance. The implementation of effective class-wide practices allows all students to reap educational and prosocial benefits (Kestner et al., 2019). Thus, this approach ensures universal access to a conducive learning environment for all students in the class. The purpose of this study was to conduct a needs assessment for needed professional development trainings to promote inclusivity in three elementary schools. We observed and gathered data on baseline classroom conditions (BCC) across a diverse range of classrooms - general education, specials (e.g. music, physical education, library), and alternative curriculum programs (ACP) - in three elementary schools in an urban area. Our evaluation focused on key behaviors that are vital to best practices in teacher-student interactions. Specifically, observations focused on classroom transitions, praise/reprimands, and delivery of instructions. We will present the results obtained through our BCC data collection and comparatively discuss the variations in data observed across the different types of classrooms.
 
Diversity submission 44. An Analysis of the Impact of Teacher Fidelity When Implementing Precision Teaching
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
SHAUNA DIFFLEY ( University of Galway), Rick M. Kubina (Penn State), Chris Noone (University of Galway), Aoife McTiernan (University of Galway)
Discussant: May Chriseline Beaubrun (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
Abstract:

Although Precision Teaching (PT) was designed to be implemented by teachers, McTiernan et al., (2021) found that PT is primarily implemented by researchers. One step towards bridging this research to practice gap and increasing the uptake of PT in schools is through exploring procedural fidelity and developing achievable implementation standards. Carroll et al., (2013) found that teachers do not consistently implement all components of academic interventions to high levels of fidelity. However, high levels of fidelity are not always necessary on all intervention components to maintain positive intervention outcomes (Brand et al., 2019). Thus, this study aimed to explore the impact of fidelity errors on student outcomes when PT is implemented by teachers. Five classroom teachers and their students in mainstream educationally disadvantaged schools in the Republic of Ireland participated in this study. Teachers were trained to use PT to teach the Morningside Math Facts Addition and Subtraction Curriculum. A between-subjects group design was used to examine the impact of fidelity on student outcomes. Each classroom was randomly assigned to one of the five fidelity variation groups (i.e. 100% fidelity, 75% fidelity, 50% fidelity, 25% fidelity, 0% fidelity). Implications of these findings for research and practice will be discussed.

 
45. Applying Good Behavior Game to Promote Cooperation and Reduce Frustrations in a Sports Initiation Class
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
HENRIQUE ANGELO (Mackenzie Presbyterian University), Victoria Madella (Mackenzie Presbyterian University), Beatriz Lima Maximo Costa (Mackenzie Presbyterian University), Karina Zettermann Trois de Avila (Mackenzie Presbyterian University), Daniela Yerin Lee Hong (Mackenzie Presbyterian University), Julia Pedrosa Prando (Mackenzie Presbyterian University)
Discussant: Micah Hope (University of North Texas and Endicott College)
Abstract:

Sports are composed by many competitive contingencies that emulates the competitive environment of other practices in our society. Those competitive contingencies inherently produce frustration since there are less reinforcers available than people competing for then. Moreover, competitive contingencies can produce many aversive contingencies that can negatively influence the development of skills. Cooperative contingencies differently can produce behaviors and reduce aversive contingencies to promote skills development. The present study reported the effects of the application of Good Behavior Game (GBG) in a sports initiation class of ten 8-year-old children to promote cooperative behaviors, such as asking for help, helping others, and encouraging others, and reduce negative expressions of frustration such as quit the sports practice, diminish his/her own sports skill and being aggressive to others when lose or make a mistake. The kids were divided into two teams independent of the sports modality being taught and cooperation and emotional regulations skills were rewarded with points. The points could be exchanged for goods or privileges in a market built by the experimenters. Emotional regulations skills were behaviors incompatible to frustration like taking a 2-minute break to breath, trying again even willing to give up or ask for help. In parallel with GBG, each day the teachers were instructed how to manage frustration and aggression and received feedback from their behaviors from previous classes. The intervention lasted for four months and showed a marked increase in cooperative behaviors and a decrease on negative expressions of frustration.

 
46. Teaching Hypothesis Testing Methods to Graduate and Undergraduate Students Using Equivalence-Based Instruction
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
DAICHI YUSUNOKI (University of Tsukuba), Soichiro Matsuda (University of Tsukuba)
Discussant: May Chriseline Beaubrun (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
Abstract:

In this study, equivalence-based instruction was used to teach hypothesis testing methods to graduate and undergraduate students majoring in psychology. Five classes six members representing the z-test, t-test, F-test, chi-square test, and binomial test, were taught. A pretest-training-posttest-maintenance design was used, and baseline relations were taught with a match-to-sample task that was controlled by a computer. The effect of training was assessed with written and computerized pretests and posttests, and 1 week after training, a written and computerized test was administered to assess the maintenance of the effect of training. The test scores improved from before to after training, derived relations emerged, and class-consistent selections were generalized to a novel context (i.e., written test) across all participants. Additionally, these effects were maintained 1 week after training across all participants. This study systematically replicates precious findings showing that equivalence-based instruction can teach advanced content to college students, and is the first study to teach hypothesis testing methods with equivalence-based instruction.

 
47. A Systematic Literature Review of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Principles Guiding Teachers to Implement Tier 2 and 3 Behavioral Interventions in Public Elementary Schools
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
SAMANTHA GAGLIANO (Endicott College), Lisa Tereshko (Endicott College)
Discussant: Micah Hope (University of North Texas and Endicott College)
Abstract:

Problem behavior has become an increasing cause of concern in public schools. Straying away from zero tolerance, schools are shifting to providing support by utilizing positive behavior supports (PBS). As public schools shift away from zero tolerance it is important educators have a baseline knowledge of the behavior principles that guide PBS in order to effectively decrease problem behavior. Despite efforts to provide primary support within a PBS model, problem behavior has continued to increase (Scott, 2001). As behavior incidents continue to rise, schools can utilize tiered interventions that derive from behavioral principles to help decrease problem behavior. This literature review consists of 20 articles that implemented tier 2 or tier 3 leveled interventions to help decrease problem behavior. From this analysis, information regarding the use of tier 2 and tier 3 behavioral interventions based on ABA principles is discussed, as well as limitations within current research and suggestions for future practice.

 
Diversity submission 48. Leveraging Antecedents and Consequences to Boost Reading Fluency for Dual-Identified Learners
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
SARATESSA PALOS (Santino Consulting LLC)
Discussant: May Chriseline Beaubrun (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
Abstract: This study examines the efficacy of an 8-week intervention aimed at enhancing reading fluency for three 4th-grade students who are dual-identified as English language learners and special education students. Grounded in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), our research addresses the unique challenges faced by this specific population in improving oral reading fluency. The intervention employs antecedent strategies, including listening passage preview and repeated readings, with consequent procedures such as contingent reinforcement or performance feedback. Employing a multiple baseline experimental design, we replicated an intervention model from Eckert, Ardoin, Daly III, & Martens (2013). Participants, selected based on dual-identified status as English Language Learners receiving special education support and services under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) (Golloher et al., 2018), represent a group often underserved by current educational systems. Results indicate a significant improvement in oral reading fluency, highlighting the effectiveness of combining antecedent and consequent procedures. This study contributes vital insights to the field, emphasizing the need for tailored interventions for dual-identified students. Golloher et al. (2018) identified that current systems in public schools do not consistently meet the needs of multilingual learners with disabilities, underscoring the importance of addressing these gaps within the education system.
 
50. The Effects of the Establishment of Conditioned Reinforcement for Observing Books on Rate of Mastery of Pre-Literacy Skills for Toddlers With Interfering Stereotypy
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
SUSAN BUTTIGIEG (Teachers College, Columbia University; The Fred S. Keller School)
Discussant: May Chriseline Beaubrun (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
Abstract:

We tested the effects of a book conditioning procedure (Buttigieg & Greer, submitted 2023) on the amount of time toddlers with developmental delays selected books in the free play area. We measured the establishment of books as conditioned reinforcers on its relation to the replacement of interfering stereotypy. We also tested the rate of learning of listener and textual responses to two-dimensional stimuli once books were conditioned as reinforcers. The study is ongoing but preliminary data suggest that consistent with Buttigieg and Greer (2023), once books are established as reinforcers, stereotypy is reduced and the rate of learning (trials-to-criterion) for letter names improves. This appears to be the case regardless of which method (operant conditioning, stimulus-stimulus pairing, or peer observation/denial) was used to condition books. Children emitted less stereotypy as a function of having more reinforcers. Results are discussed in generalizing to other populations, conditioning other reinforcers, and an empirical definition of reading readiness.

 
 

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