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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

Event Details

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Symposium #265
CE Offered: BACB
Computer Assisted Instruction: Evaluations of Headsprout and Edmark
Sunday, May 27, 2018
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom HI
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Helena Lydon, Ph.D.
Chair: Helena Lydon (National University of Ireland Galway)
Abstract: This symposium presents a series of three studies designed to examine the use of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) on teaching reading to both adults with intellectual disabilities and children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The first paper was a clustered randomized comparison design was used to investigate the Edmark Reading Program (ERP) and to compare its efficacy in teaching reading outcomes in its table-top (n =16) and CAI (n=15) versions. The second paper evaluates the effects of Headsprout Early Reading in the developing of reading with six adults with learning disabilities. A multiple baseline probe design across participants was used. The third paper presents the outcomes of a parent led intervention. Participants across groups were matched according to level of entry of the reading intervention and were subsequently randomly assigned to either an experimental (n = 13) or control (n = 13) condition as recruited. The study used a between-groups design to evaluate the effects of Headsprout on the reading outcomes and print motivation of children with ASD.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Computer Assisted, Edmark©, Headsprout©, Reading
Target Audience: BCBA
Learning Objectives: To inform BCBA's about the use of Edmark Reading Programme for teaching reading to children with autism spectrum disorder To inform BCBA's about the effects of Headsprout Early reading for young adults with intellectual disabilities To inform BCBA's about having parents as the key interventions in teaching reading to children with autism spectrum disorder
 
The Edmark Reading Program: A Comparison of Computerized and Table Top Presentation in Reading Outcomes in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Amanda Nally (National University of Ireland, Galway), JENNIFER HOLLOWAY (National University of Ireland, Galway), Olive Healy (Trinity College Dublin), Helena Lydon (National University of Ireland, Galway)
Abstract: A clustered randomized comparison design was used to investigate the Edmark Reading Program (ERP) and to compare its efficacy in teaching reading outcomes using both table-top and software format. A sample of 31 participants with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder were assigned to conditions using cluster random sampling. Participants were exposed to ERP in one of two conditions, table-top presentation (TTI) or computerized assisted instruction (CAI), for one full school semester. Assessments of reading ability were conducted before and after exposure to ERP on word reading, accuracy, rate, phonemic awareness, vocabulary, and reading comprehension. This study demonstrated that when ERP, TTI and CAI formats were compared, there were statistically significant differences found in favor of TTI on reading accuracy, reading rate, and phonemic awareness, specifically first sound fluency. Results indicate the efficacy of the table-top presentation of the reading program in these particular reading outcomes. The findings are discussed in light of existing research and the cost-benefit of both presentations
 
Teaching Early Reading Skills to Young Adults With Moderate Intellectual Disabilities Using Headsprout Early Reading
HELENA LYDON (National University of Ireland, Galway), Gemma Sheridan (National University of Ireland, Galway), Amanda Nally (National University of Ireland, Galway), Jennifer Holloway (National University of Ireland, Galway)
Abstract: Many adults with Intellectual disability can have difficulty gaining reading skills acquisition. A multiple probe design across six participants was used to examine the effectiveness of Headsprout Early Reading. Participants were assigned to dyads (based on baseline probe), with two participants placed on the same baseline. Accuracy of sprout cards was the dependent variable selected for decisions in relation to implementation. Results indicated that Headsprout Early Reading had high social validity across participants, their parents and facilitators of the program. Outcome results also indicated an improvement in reading accuracy and fluency for all participants.
 
Investigating the Use of Headsprout Reading Programme by Parents in the Home Environment With Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
AMANDA NALLY (National University of Ireland, Galway), Jennifer Holloway (National University of Ireland, Galway), Olive Healy (Trinity College Dublin), Helena Lydon (National University of Ireland Galway)
Abstract: A between-groups design was used to evaluate the Headsprout on the reading outcomes and print motivation of a sample of 26 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Headsprout was implemented by parents in their homes, who received training on in the identification of learning difficulties whereby additional support was provided to participants based on these specific learning problems. Results demonstrated that participants who received Headsprout showed greater gains in word reading, non-word reading, and the target sound and words of Headsprout. The results of print motivation demonstrated that only the print material specific to the program had an increase in preference at post-tests. Findings indicate that this reading program can be successfully implemented with children with ASD by parents in the home environment, with the addition of adaptations and learning support.
 

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