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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

Event Details

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Symposium #423
CE Offered: BACB
Shaping Procedures in Sports Topographies: TAGTeach™ and Other Behavior Analytic Approaches to Increase Performance
Monday, May 28, 2018
9:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom G
Area: CSS/DDA
CE Instructor: Robin Arnall, M.S.
Chair: Susan D. Flynn (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Julie S. Vargas (B. F. Skinner Foundation)
Abstract: In the behavior analytic literature, there are several effective studies highlighting sport performance and improving the efficiency of specific sport topographies, such as in gymnastics and football. The studies presented will highlight findings demonstrated through behavior analytic studies on golf, swimming, and dance. Children and adult populations will both be considered, along with differing diagnostic criteria.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Developmental Disabilities, Shaping, Sports, TAGTeach
Target Audience: Practitioners interested in research relating to skill acquisition in sports using TAGteach™
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn how TAGteach™ and shaping procedures could be utilized to enhance sport performance across different topographies. Participants will learn basics of TAGteach methods of instruction. Participants will be able to explain the effectiveness of TAGteach instruction through the principles of behavior analysis.
 
Using TAGteach™ Methods to Teach Novel Dance Movements to Typically Developing Children
(Applied Research)
Robin Arnall (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, The Arc of the Ozarks), Annette Griffith (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Susan D. Flynn (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), KRYSTLE LEE CURLEY (The Chicago School for Professional Psychology)
Abstract: Teaching with Acoustical Guidance™ (TAGteach™) involves providing a brief and consistent sound in the form of a clicker or beep to provide feedback on a targeted behavior, which has demonstrated positive effects for athletic skill acquisition. This study is a replication of Quinn, Miltenberger, and Fogel (2015), and uses a multiple baseline design across behaviors to examine the effects of TAGteach methods on the acquisition of novel dance movements. The participants in this study were three typically developing children aged 5–9 years old who regularly participate in a dance studio program. The findings demonstrated more rapid and generalized skill sets for different topographies of targeted dance movements: a turn, kick, and leap. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.
 
Using TAGteach™ for Increasing Skill Acquisition of Dance Movements for a Child With Multiple Diagnoses
(Applied Research)
ROBIN ARNALL (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology; The Arc of the Ozarks), Annette Griffith (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Susan D. Flynn (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: Teaching with Acoustical Guidance™ (TAGteach™), has been demonstrated as effective in sport performance literature across various topographies and types of sports. The following study is an extension of Quinn, Miltenberger, and Fogel (2015), and uses a multiple baseline design across behaviors to examine the effects of TAGteach methods on the acquisition of novel dance movements. The participant in this study was a child with multiple diagnoses who participates in regular dance instruction. Results indicated that the use of TAGteach resulted in rapid skill acquisition for three different topographies of advanced targeted dance movements: a turn, kick, and leap. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.
 
Let's Go Under! Teaching Water Safety Skills Using a Behavioral Treatment Package
(Applied Research)
MELISSA HUNSINGER HARRIS (Bay Path University), Kimberly Levy (Bay Path University), Susan Ainsleigh (Bay Path University)
Abstract: Drowning is a leading cause of unintentional death among children worldwide. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at higher risk for incidents of drowning then their non-disabled peers. Mastering water safety skills, such as underwater submersion, has been associated with a decreased risk for incidents of drowning. Using a combined multiple-baseline and changing-criterion design, this study examined the effects of a behavioral treatment package consisting of shaping, prompting, and positive reinforcement utilized to teach three young children to demonstrate underwater submersion during weekly swimming lessons. During baseline, none of the participants submerged their head underwater despite previous modeling and instruction. Following the implementation of the behavioral treatment package, all three participants submerged their entire head underwater. Each participant maintained this skill following instruction and later developed more advanced swimming abilities utilizing the mastered skill of underwater submersion. This research is a demonstration of the application of behavioral techniques to teach an extra-curricular sporting skill that also can save a childs life.
 
Effects of TAGteach™ Strategies and Video-Modeling and Feedback on Golf Skills in Experienced Golfers
(Applied Research)
LAURIE BONAVITA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Annette Griffith (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Susan D. Flynn (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: In competitive sports at all levels, skill acquisition and improvement is an area of focus for many athletes. Several studies have been done to examine the use of operant conditioning or behavioral coaching on acquiring or improving new skills in several different sports. The following study seeks to examine the use of TAGteach™ and video modeling and feedback with experienced golfer ranging in age from 20 to over 40. This study will also examine the generalization of acquired or improved skills to the golf course.
 

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