Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

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Symposium #227
CE Offered: BACB
Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Applications to Enhance Performance in Sports and Gaming
Sunday, May 26, 2024
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Downtown, Level 4, Franklin Hall 12-13
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Raymond G. Miltenberger (University of South Florida)
CE Instructor: Raymond G. Miltenberger, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This symposium includes three recent studies evaluating behavioral approaches to enhance performance in sports and gaming. The first paper by Samantha Martinez, describes a study comparing video feedback versus video modeling and video feedback for enhancing performance of ball control skills in soccer. Her results, in a multiple baseline across participants and adapted alternative treatments design, showed similar increases in performance with both interventions. The second paper by Cara Shapiro evaluates an intervention consisting of gradual exposure and thought training to help gymnasts overcome performance blocks in the execution of gymnastics skills. Her results, in a multiple baseline design across participants, showed the intervention helped three gymnasts overcome performance blocks in three different skills. The third paper by Romel White describes a study evaluating video feedback for enhancing the performance of a defensive move in an online video game, Street Fighter V. His results, in a multiple baseline design across participants, showed increased performance for a three participants that generalized to ranked online matches.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): gaming, gymnastics, soccer, sports
Target Audience:

BCBAs and BCaBAs

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to describe video modeling and video feedback for enhancing sports performance in soccer At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to describe an intervention for performance blocks in gymnastics consisting of graduate exposure and thought training At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to describe the application of video feedback for enhancing a pivotal skill in an online video game
 

Comparing Video Feedback to Video Modeling Plus Video Feedback for Improving Soccer Skills

SAMANTHA MARTINEZ (University of South Florida), Raymond G. Miltenberger (University of South Florida), Shreeya Deshmukh (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

This study compared the effects of video feedback (VF) as a stand-alone intervention and the effects of a video modeling plus video feedback (VMVF) as a package intervention for improving soccer players’ static ball control skills. Static ball control skills involve ball movements with the feet executed without movement in the field. This study used a multiple baseline across participants with an embedded alternating treatments design to compare VF and VMVF. Following baseline, two skills received the intervention and one skill continued without intervention as a control skill. This study involved two 10-year-old female soccer players and one 9-year-old male soccer player. The same three target behaviors were assessed across participants. The first author implemented the VF and VMVF training procedures. The results showed that VF and VMVF produced similar increases in performance for the three participants and that both interventions were effective at substantially increasing ball control skills from baseline levels and compared to a control skill.

 
Evaluating a Behavioral Intervention for Performance Blocks in Gymnastics
CARA SHAPIRO (University of South Florida), Raymond G. Miltenberger (University of South Florida), Sharayah Tai (University of South Florida)
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a gradual exposure and thought training treatment package to increase gymnasts’ successful completion of a performance block skill. Following baseline, the researchers implemented both a thought training procedure to alter participants’ negative thoughts into positive thoughts, and a gradual exposure procedure which included gymnastics drills that were small approximations to the performance block skill. A 2-point rating scale was used to indicate successful completion of the skills: 0= refusal, 1= the participant initiated the skill but failed to complete it successfully, 2= the participant initiated the skill and completed it successfully. Rating scale scores, latency, and Subjective Units of Discomfort Scale (SUDS) (Abramowitz et al., 2011) were measured during baseline, the gradual exposure and thought training package, and follow-up. The Sport Anxiety Scale-2 (SAS-2) (Smith et al., 2006) was used to measure anxiety levels of the gymnasts at baseline and follow-up. The results showed that all three participants completed their performance block skill successfully during the post-treatment and follow-up sessions.
 
Evaluating Video Feedback to Improve eSports Performance in Street Fighter V
Romel White (University of South Florida), ANTHONY CONCEPCION (University of South Florida), Raymond G. Miltenberger (University of South Florida)
Abstract: eSports is a newly rising field with rapidly increasing cultural validity. Despite the wide array of similarities between eSports and traditional sports, behavioral skill acquisition interventions have yet to be applied to video game skills. Feedback-based behavioral interventions in particular have been widely used and implemented for effective skill acquisition for traditional sports. Although video feedback has been established as effective in conjunction with video modeling for traditional sports, further research is needed to validate its efficacy as a standalone intervention. In this study, the effects of video feedback were analyzed in a multiple baseline across subjects design. Participants attempted to perform a specific in-game behavior (an anti-air attack) in a controlled match against a skilled confederate, then viewed a recording of their performance and receive positive and corrective feedback from the researchers. The generalization of the skill improvement were evaluated through the rate of successful skill implementation in ranked online matches. Results showed that video feedback improved performance of all participants.
 

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