Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

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Poster Session #484E
TBA Monday Poster Session
Monday, May 27, 2024
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Convention Center, 200 Level, Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Eric Anderson (Bowling Green State University)
Diversity submission 48. Promoting Cultural Responsiveness Through Training and Supervision
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
HANNAH LOOMIS (University of Florida), Corina Jimenez-Gomez (University of Florida), Lauren Beaulieu (Newton Public Schools)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract:

Practitioners in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) encounter diverse client populations and must therefore be equipped to competently provide services across varied cultural groups. A diverse service population in combination with updated ethical guidelines for behavior analysts requiring the inclusion of cultural responsiveness, illustrates the need for curricula to develop culturally responsive practices. Unfortunately, there are currently no empirically validated approaches for increasing awareness, knowledge, and skills of cultural responsiveness in behavior analysts. Thus, an eight-hour training was developed on the topic of cultural responsiveness, comprised of cultural competence training, self-assessment, behavioral assessment and treatment, supervision, and ethics components. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) evaluate whether this eight-hour online course on culturally responsive behavior analytic practices would impact awareness and knowledge of participants, and (2) evaluate whether completing the online course would improve performance in clinical situations. Pre- and post-completion of the curricula, participants completed a survey, and a subset of participants provided a behavior sample (i.e., recorded video) to assess potential impacts on performance. Findings suggested that following the completion of the curricula, participants demonstrated increases in their knowledge of the material included in the course and self-rating of skills, but there were no significant increases in measured dimensions of cultural competence.

 
49. The Effect of Different Amounts of Feedback on Social Media Engagement
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
MADISON DUKE (ABA Technologies), Kristin K. Myers-Kemp (ABA Technologies Inc. and FIT ABA Online)
Discussant: Eilis O'Connell-Sussman
Abstract: Behavior analysts on social media need to generate reinforcement for their audience through their posts, but identifying this reinforcement can be difficult. Though traditional preference assessments cannot be conducted through the internet, one way to measure the effectiveness of a social media post is through engagement rate (ER)- the number of interactions a post receives divided by the number of viewers who saw the post. ER can vary based on many factors, including the type of post. For those posting exam prep material for students of behavior analysis, ER may differ when encouraging community building, posting a test question, or providing feedback on a test question. Feedback posts provide additional information for the student, including the correct answer, clarifying definitions, and/ or why another answer was incorrect. It was noted that the amount of feedback affected ER in a private exam prep group (no demographics were collected on the group members). This poster systematically varied the amount of feedback provided within social media posts to examine the effect on ER. The findings showed that ER was higher for posts with more feedback than posts with less, suggesting students receive more reinforcement from posts with more information.
 
Diversity submission 51. Assessing Discriminatory Language: A Tool to Increase Comfortability and Competence
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
SARAH BROWN (Bancroft), Tracy L. Kettering (Bancroft), Kellie P. Goldberg (Bancroft), Jeff Schram (Bancroft)
Discussant: Eilis O'Connell-Sussman
Abstract:

Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs®) are likely to interact with a wide variety of individuals, many of whom do not share their racial or cultural identities (Conners, 2021), which may increase the need for specific training in professional interactions that are culturally sensitive and responsive. Gatzunis (2023) used Behavioral Skills Training (BST) to increase the empathetic and culturally responsive functional behavior assessment (FBA) interviewing skills of caregivers who did not share the identity of the interviewers. Similar skills may be required for FBA interviewing related to sensitive behaviors, such as client use of discriminatory language. In the current study, we used BST and an FBA interview script to teach interviewing skills related to derogatory or discriminatory behavior to BCBAs in a multiple-probe design. During baseline and post-training, participants conducted mock FBA interviews with a confederate caregiver over videoconference. Data were collected on 22 interview skills across three areas: assessment skills, cultural competency, and empathetic and compassionate interview techniques. Indirect assessments were used to evaluate participant self-rated competence in conducting an FBA of discriminative language before and after training. Results suggest that BST improved the interview skills of all participants, despite some BCBAs self-rating their competence high during baseline.

 
52. Teaching Practical Problem-Solving Skills to Individuals in Service Delivery
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
ELIZABETH PARTHUM (Mount Saint Mary's University ), Kwadwo O. Britwum (Mount Saint Mary's University), David J. Cox (RethinkFirst; Endicott College)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract: This study determined the feasibility of teaching individuals in service delivery to solve practical ethical conflicts using the problem-solving methodology published by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). A multiple-baseline-across-participants design was used to evaluate the efficacy of the teaching procedure. Participants were presented with choice scenarios in the baseline, each describing an ethical conflict. They responded vocally with the course of action to solve the conflict and how to implement it. Next, in the pretraining phase, participants were presented with a problem-solving task analysis (PSTA) to resolve the conflict. In the training phase, modeling, replication, and feedback were employed to teach participants to use the PSTA. Finally, participants were presented with ethical conflict scenarios compiled by practitioners and asked again to resolve the ethical conflicts using procedures identical to the baseline. Across all phases, participants were scored on their accurate and independent use of the PSTA, choice of ethical response (descriptive ethics), and the rationale used to justify the choice response (normative ethics). Results provide implications for teaching decision-making skills to individuals in service delivery.
 
Diversity submission 53. Teaching Frontline Staff to Use a Culturally Responsive Approach During Reinforcer Interviews
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
IRIS MLAHYENOH SHERIFF (MSM), Kwadwo O. Britwum (Mount Saint Mary's University)
Discussant: Eilis O'Connell-Sussman
Abstract:

Cultural responsiveness is an ethical responsibility for behavior analysts that must be upheld according to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). Despite this guideline, behavior analysts may need to be adequately equipped to engage in a culturally responsive manner with service recipients. Previous studies have shown that behavior skills training (BST) can increase cultural responsiveness among practitioners (Gatzunis et al., 2023). Therefore, the purpose of the current study is to replicate and extend Gatzunis et al. (2023) by evaluating the effects of BST to increase practitioner cultural responsiveness in the context of completing the Reinforcer Assessment for Individuals with Severe Disabilities (RAISD, Piazza et al., 1996). A multiple baseline across participants’ designs was used to evaluate the effects of a remotely delivered BST package on the cultural responsiveness skills of graduate students. Following the training, a social validity assessment was delivered to assess participants’ impressions of the training. Results provide implications for developing the cultural responsiveness skills of behavior analysts in the context of completing the RAISD.

 
Sustainability submission 54. History of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) in Turkey: How Did It Start and How Is It Going?
Area: TBA; Domain: Theory
FATIH ERDOGAN (University of Massachusetts Boston)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract:

ABA is a relatively new, popular, and controversial discipline in Turkey. Even if the first studies and books were published in the '90s, some scholars would mention the previously unpublished manuscripts. The study adopts the qualitative inquiry, and the interviews were conducted with the first scholars in Turkey. The participants, full-time professors in different universities, were determined by the purposive sample selection and the adapted snowball technique to reach each scholar. The study aims to enlighten the development of ABA in Turkey and seeks the following research questions: 1) How was it revealed, and what was the first action for ABA in Turkey? 2) How does ABA become visible, and which institutions, organizations, and people take roles? 3) How is going on about ABA in today: weaknesses and strengths? The data narrative analysis applies all interview transcripts, and the verbal history of ABA regenerates chronologically. The study can bring a new discussion about ABA development in Turkey.

 
55. Training Future Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) and School Psychologists to Address Bullying Behavior Through an Interdisciplinary Coordinated Field Experience: A Partnership Between Northern Illinois University, DeKalb School Community District #128, and Rockford Public Schools # 205
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
JESSE (WOODY) W. JOHNSON (Northern Illinois University), Michelle Demaray (Northern Illinois University), Julia Ogg (Northern Illinois University), Christine Malecki (Northern Illinois University)
Discussant: Eilis O'Connell-Sussman
Abstract: Northern Illinois University’s Project Prevent and Address Bullying Behavior at All Tiers (PPABB) is a collaboration between the Specialist in School Psychology Program and the Special Education M.S.Ed. Specialization in Behavior Analysis Program at NIU. The project provides specialized cross-disciplinary training to prevent and address bullying behavior in schools. Scholars from both school psychology and special education receive specialized training and shared coursework. A coordinated interdisciplinary practicum occurs during the final semester of training. Each school psychology scholar is paired with a special education/BCBA scholar in his/her school site. While scholars complete activities associated with school-wide and class-wide levels of support, the focus of the practicum is on targeted Tier 3 interventions. Each PPABB Scholar dyad identifies one or more school-age students with intensive needs who engages bullying behavior. The scholars 1) conduct a functional behavior assessment, 2) work with school-based teams to develop function-based comprehensive behavior support plans, 3) provide training and support to implement multi-tiered interventions, and 4) evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of the interventions and 5) provide follow-up support as needed. The Coordinated Interdisciplinary Field Experience serves as a culminating experience in which PPABB Scholars apply knowledge and skills gained throughout the shared coursework under the supervision of a practicing psychologist and Board Certified Behavior Analyst.
 
 

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