Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

Event Details


Previous Page

 

Symposium #424
CE Offered: BACB
Current Research on Communication Modality Assessments for Individuals With Development Disabilities
Monday, May 27, 2024
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center, 100 Level, 112 AB
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Delaney E Schneider (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Muroe-Meyer Institute)
CE Instructor: Alexandra Cicero, M.A.
Abstract:

Individuals with developmental disabilities do not always acquire vocal speech and may require an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) modality. Although identifying an efficient and effective communication modality is important for expanding the individuals communication repertoire, oftentimes communication modalities are selected arbitrarily. The studies presented in this symposium highlight different, more systematic procedures for identifying mand modalities for individuals diagnosed with developmental disabilities. The purpose of the first study was to evaluate an assessment package for determining appropriate communication modalities to use in mand training with adults with IDD that have communication deficits (e.g., limited/absent mand repertoires, no systematic/formal communication system, idiosyncratic modalities; Simmons et al.). The second study will describe procedures for assessing child and caregiver preference for communication modalities during functional communication training (Cicero et al.) Finally, the third study will assess the effects of a sequential extinction procedure on preference for communication modalities during functional communication training (Loder et al.). Future research and clinical implications will also be discussed.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): communication modalities, problem behavior
Target Audience:

Basic

Learning Objectives: 1. The audience will be able to describe procedures for identifying communication modalities. 2. The audience will be able to describe procedures for measuring preference for communication modalities. 3. The audience will be able to describe procedures for assessing the efficiency of different communication modalities.
 

Identifying Appropriate Communication Modalities in Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: An Assessment Package

BRYAN ALAN SIMMONS (University of Kansas), Claudia L. Dozier (The University of Kansas), Marissa E. Kamlowsky (The University of Kansas), Catherine McHugh (University of Kansas ), Stacha Leslie (University of Kansas), Elizabeth Hardesty (University of Kansas), Thomas Freetly (University of Kansas )
Abstract:

Some individuals diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) have communication deficits that hinder their interactions with their environment (Carnett et al., 2019). Because communication modalities are commonly selected arbitrarily (e.g., practitioner preference, caregiver/parent opinion), this may further impact the acquisition and persistence of communication (Kunnavatana et al., 2018). The purpose of this study is to evaluate an assessment package for determining appropriate communication modalities to use in mand training with adults with IDD that have communication deficits (e.g., limited/absent mand repertoires, no systematic/formal communication system, idiosyncratic modalities). Specifically, we are replicating and extending Valentino et al. (2019) by conducting a prerequisite skills assessment, as well as implementing a mand training sequence (Gutierrez et al., 2007) to ensure that discriminated manding is either present or established. Following mand training, a communication modality preference assessment is conducted to assess participant preference, if relevant. Preliminary results show participants’ prerequisite skills only sometimes mapped onto modalities acquired, and additional manipulations were sometimes necessary to acquire differentiated responding with modalities.

 
Comparison of Caregivers' and Children's Preference for Mand Topography During Functional Communication Training
ALEXANDRA CICERO (University of Nebraska Medical Center- Munroe Meyer Institute ), Cynthia P. Livingston (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Jordan DeBrine (The Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine ), Isaac Joseph Melanson (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Brittany Tomasi (Endicott College), Daniel Kwak (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract: Functional communication training (FCT; Carr & Durand, 1985) is frequently utilized as a treatment for socially maintained problem behavior (Tiger et al., 2008). Although FCT is a viable treatment option for the reduction of problem behavior, researchers have identified several variables related to the selection of the FCR topography that may influence treatment outcomes, including individual and caregiver preference. However, there may be times in which the target individual and caregiver preference do not match. Given this, there is a need for procedures to identify and compare both child and caregiver preferences. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify a preferred FCR topography via mand topography assessment and compare results of the mand topography assessment with a formal assessment of caregiver preference. The results of this study indicated that both child and caregiver participants demonstrated a preference for at least one FCR topography. Although preference for both the child and caregiver participants was identified, child and caregiver preference did not match, except for a partial match for one caregiver-child dyad.
 
Teaching Multiple Functional Communication Response Modalities for Increased Durability: Findings and Clinical Implications for Response Allocation
BRITTANY HOPE LODER-LAFFERTY (University of Nebraska Medical Center- Munro-Meyer Institute ), Cynthia P. Livingston (University of Nebraska Medical Center), Daniel Kwak (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Mirela Cengher (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Abstract: Previous research has evaluated the effects of teaching multiple functional communication response (FCR) modalities during FCT to increase the durability of treatment effects upon contact with a disruptor (e.g., extinction; Lambert et al., 2015). Specifically, teaching a variety of socially appropriate response modalities can ensure that one or more of the response modalities resurges prior to challenging behavior. Similarly, additional research has evaluated preference in the persistence of FCRs after contacting extinction, showing more preferred FCR modalities can persist for a longer time (Ringdahl et al., 2018). However, such research evaluating the effects of FCR preference on persistence has assessed individually signaled extinction components, therefore not allowing visualization of response hierarchy for FCR modality. This current study used procedures similar to Hanley et al. (2014) to assess the effects of response restriction on preference for FCR modalities for 3 children with developmental disabilities who engaged in problem behavior. Specifically, this study evaluates a response hierarchy for FCR modalities, comparing results to that of the mand topography assessment (MTA) with response restriction. Implications and findings will be discussed.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
DONATE