Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

50th Annual Convention; Philadelphia, PA; 2024

Event Details


Previous Page

 

Symposium #391
CE Offered: BACB
Developments in Teaching Play Skills to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Monday, May 27, 2024
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center, 100 Level, 114
Area: AUT/DEV; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Heather Pane (Daemen University)
Discussant: Michelle A. Hickman (Daemen University)
CE Instructor: Heather Pane, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) present with delays in the development of play skills. This symposium will describe interventions to teach play skills to children with ASD. The first study conducted a quantitative analysis of published peer-reviewed studies that evaluated interventions to teach toy play skills to children with ASD. The second study replicated and extended Pane et al. (2022) by comparing the acquisition of development-matched and age-matched play targets. The authors extended Pane et al. by targeting different play categories, assessing additional imitation skills, and conducting a caregiver assessment to determine each participant’s common experiences and preferences, as well caregiver’s values and preferences. The third study investigated whether visual aids, such as picture cues, were necessary to teach preschool-aged autistic children to make contextually appropriate play statements while playing with playsets. Participants required picture cues to increase their contextually appropriate play statements. The fourth study examined the effects that a linked digital activity schedule had on promoting cooperative thematic play between children with ASD. Participants demonstrated increased engagement in contextually appropriate cooperative play, and caregivers exhibited support for the goals, procedures, and outcomes. Implications and future directions for research and teaching play skills will be addressed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts or those studying to be behavior analysts enrolled in or recently completed graduate-level work in behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will: 1. Identify evidence-based interventions for teaching play skills to children with autism spectrum disorder. 2. Identify variables to consider when teaching play skills (e.g., assessment, play targets) 3. Identify areas of future research in teaching play skills to children with autism spectrum disorder.
 

Teaching Toy Play Skills to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Review of the Literature

HEATHER PANE (Daemen University), Toni Rose Agana (Caldwell University), Tina Sidener (Caldwell University), Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University), April N. Kisamore (Hunter College, CUNY), Anjalee Nirgudkar (Behavior Analysts of New Jersey, LLC)
Abstract:

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often present with delays in the development of play skills, requiring intensive intervention. Clinicians commonly target toy play skills with this population, and therefore a current comprehensive review of toy play interventions to inform clinicians about empirically-based procedures and to facilitate future lines of research was warranted. The current paper provides a context for behavioral interventions for play skills by first summarizing theories of play and describing play of neurotypically developing children and children with autism spectrum disorder, followed by a systematic quantitative analysis of published peer-reviewed studies that evaluated interventions to teach toy play skills to children with ASD. Sixty-six evaluations met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated across several parameters (e.g., pre-assessment, dependent variable, functional/symbolic play, independent variable, naturalistic teaching components, generalization). A comprehensive summary of the findings is provided, along with recommendations about toy play instruction (e.g., play assessment, toys, play partner, play actions) and future areas for research are recommended.

 
Comparing Development-Matched and Age-Matched Play Targets: A Replication and Extension
TONI ROSE AGANA (Caldwell University), Tina Sidener (Caldwell University), Heather Pane (Daemen University), Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract: Previous research has supported selecting development-matched (DM; i.e., based on an individual’s development) targets rather than age-matched (AM; i.e., based on chronological age) targets to teach play skills to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, few studies have been conducted, and replications and extensions of this research are needed. The current study replicated Pane et al. (2022) by comparing the acquisition of DM and AM play targets when teaching play skills to four children with ASD. No contrived prompts or consequences were used to teach play skills in either condition. Extensions included identifying targets via a newer version of the Developmental Play Assessment (DPA), participants with different DPA play categories than those in Pane et al., assessing additional imitation skills, and conducting a caregiver assessment, the Family Values and Experiences questionnaire (FaVE), to determine each participant’s common experiences and preferences, as well as their caregiver’s values and preferences. As in Pane et al., participants demonstrated a higher level of scripted play actions in the DM condition than in the AM condition.
 

Evaluating the Role of Visual Aids When Teaching Autistic Preschoolers to Comment During Play

BEVERLY NICHOLS (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Thomas S. Higbee (Utah State University), Nick Alexander Lindgren (Utah State University), Vincent E. Campbell (California State University Stanislaus), Kassidy Reinert (Utah State University), Jessica Osos (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Deficits in communication and play can affect the quality of life of autistic children. Script training and fading is an evidence-based practice that can be used to teach communication during play. A recent study suggests that script frames can become associated with other supplemental visual stimuli, picture cues. However, fading supplemental visual stimuli can be difficult. If we can associate script frames with other visual stimuli that are a part of the natural environment, such as the toys children are playing with, then fading of supplemental visual stimuli would not be necessary. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether visual aids, such as picture cues, are necessary to teach preschool-aged autistic children to make contextually appropriate play statements while playing with playsets. We began teaching contextually appropriate play statements using only echoic prompts. If echoic prompts alone were unsuccessful at sufficiently increasing responding, we introduced picture cues, with attending and echoic prompts. All three participants required the introduction of picture cues to increase their contextually appropriate play statements. Two participants also required pre-session behavioral skills training with the picture cues to meet mastery.

 
Using Linked Digital Activity Schedules to Prompt Cooperative Thematic Play
VINCENT E. CAMPBELL (California State University Stanislaus), Thomas S. Higbee (Utah State University), Beverly Nichols (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Nick Alexander Lindgren (Utah State University), Kinsey Wallace (Utah State University), JESSICA Anna OSOS (Utah State University), Kassidy Reinert (Utah State University)
Abstract: Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may demonstrate behavioral deficits and excesses that may limit their ability to effectively respond within a social play setting. As a result, children with ASD may choose to engage in isolated play, thus, limiting their ability to access the benefits associated with social play. Behavioral research has demonstrated that the implementation of activity schedules targeting cooperative play has led to an increase in appropriate play for children with ASD. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects that a linked digital activity schedule has on promoting cooperative thematic play between children on the autism spectrum. In this study, three dyads of participants with ASD demonstrated the acquisition of thematic play scenarios when they received training on the linked digital activity schedule. Additionally, participants demonstrated an increased engagement in contextually appropriate cooperative play, and caregivers exhibited support for the goals, procedures, and outcomes of this teaching approach as their child independently engaged in cooperative thematic play. Our results, however, do not provide significant evidence to claim that the teaching procedures are associated with increased novel vocal responses, higher affect scores, or consistent generalization of contextually appropriate cooperative play to the home setting.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
DONATE