Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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49th Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2023

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Poster Session #47E
CBM Saturday Poster Session
Saturday, May 27, 2023
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Convention Center, Exhibit Hall F
Chair: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Diversity submission 65. Experienced Stigma and Healthcare Avoidance Among Women With Obesity: Fusion as a Moderator
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
MCKENNA PRYNN (80230), Mirka Jara Rivas (Metropolitan State University of Denver), Elizabeth Lukela (Metropolitan State University of Denver), Keegan Moore (Metropolitan State University of Denver), Maureen Flynn (Metropolitan State University of Denver)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract: Obesity is associated with health care avoidance and delay for preventative care among women. Considering the potential impact of healthcare avoidance on morbidity and mortality, it is important to identify factors that may influence healthcare avoidance among women. One such factor is experienced weight stigma (e.g., Puhl et al., 2013), which is commonly experienced among individuals with obesity (e.g., Puhl et al., 2021). Therefore, we need to identify malleable variables that may influence the relationship between experienced weight stigma and health care avoidance. One such variable may be fusion (i.e., difficulty detaching thoughts or images from what they refer to). Thus, the current study aimed to examine whether fusion (general and related to body image) moderated the relationship between weight stigma and healthcare avoidance among women with obesity. The sample consisted of 261 adult female participants with obesity. Participants were recruited on Prolific, which is an online participant recruitment company. Participants completed a series of questionnaires online. Results showed that fusion, both general and related to body image, moderated the relationship between experienced weight stigma and health care avoidance. Future research should examine the impact of interventions that target fusion on healthcare avoidance among this population.
 
66. Examining the Effects of Interviewer Behavior on the Accuracy of Children’s Responses: A Replication of Sparling et al., (2011)
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
MILAD NAJAFICHAGHABOURI (Utah State University ), P. Raymond Joslyn (Utah State University), Emma Preston (Utah State)
Discussant: Thomas J. Waltz (Eastern Michigan University)
Abstract: Various factors may influence the accuracy of children’s responses to questions about recent events in the context of an interview. Research has shown that children may respond idiosyncratically to the way questions are asked and the interviewer’s responses to their answers. However, behavioral research in this area is limited. Sparling et al. (2011) showed that children frequently provided inaccurate responses to questions about video clips they had just watched depending on the antecedents (i.e., the way a question was asked) and consequences (i.e., the response of the interviewer to their answers). In the current study, we replicated Sparling et al. and found that only two of five children were sensitive to the various antecedents and consequences manipulated in Sparling et al. Our findings indicate a need for more research in this area to determine the relevant environmental variables for evoking children’s accurate and inaccurate responses.
 
Diversity submission 67. Weight-Related Stigma and Healthcare Avoidance Among Women: The Role of Experiential Avoidance as a Moderator
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
MIRKA JARA RIVAS (Metropolitan State University Of Denver), Mckenna Prynn (80230), Keegan Moore (Metropolitan State University Of Denver), Elizabeth Lukela (Metropolitan State University Of Denver), Maureen Flynn (Metropolitan State University of Denver)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract: Although obesity is associated with increased heatlh care utilization, it is also linked with preventative health care avoidance among women. Experienced weight stigma is positively associated with health care avoidance among women with obesity (e.g., Puhl et al., 2013) but there must be moderating variables involved. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether experiential avoidance (i.e., avoidance of internal private events) and acceptance (i.e., willingness to allow difficult internal experiences to be present) strengthen or weaken the relationship between experienced weight stigma and healthcare avoidance among this population. The sample consisted of 261 female adults, who were recruited on Prolific (i.e., an online participant recruitment company). Participants completed an assessment battery in an online format. Results showed that experiential avoidance moderated the relationship between experienced weight stigma and health care avoidance but acceptance did not. These results show a need to develop and test the efficacy of treatments targeting experiential avoidance on healthcare utilization among this population.
 
Diversity submission 68. Weight-Related Stigma and Well-Being Among College Students With Overweight and Obesity: The Role of Fusion as a Moderator
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
ELIZABETH LUKELA (Metropolitan State University Of Denver), Keegan Moore (Metropolitan State University Of Denver), Mckenna Prynn (80230), Mirka Jara Rivas (Metropolitan State University Of Denver), Maureen Flynn (Metropolitan State University of Denver)
Discussant: Thomas J. Waltz (Eastern Michigan University)
Abstract: According to results from a nationally representative college student sample, 30.4% were overweight or obese. Obesity is negatively associated other quality of life variables, such as life satisfaction (e.g., Kuroki, 2016; Wadsworth & Pendergast, 2014), flourishing (e.g., Robertson et al., 2015), and obesity-related quality of life (e.g., Mannucci et al., 1999). Experienced stigmatizing situations related to weight is associated with lower levels of wellbeing among individuals with obesity (e.g., Hayward et al., 2018). The aim of the current study was to examine whether fusion (i.e., difficulty detaching thoughts or images from what they refer to) moderates the relationship between experienced stigma and well-being among college students with overweight or obesity. Participants included 366 college students with overweight or obesity. Participants completed a series of assessments online. Results showed that both fusion moderated the relationship between experienced stigma and wellbeing such that fusion strengthened the relationship. Future studies could examine the efficacy and effectiveness interventions that target fusion reduction on well-being among college students who are overweight or obese and have experienced stigma related to their weight.
 
69. The Efficacy of a Brief Values Interventions in a Spider-Related Behavioral Approach
Area: CBM; Domain: Basic Research
KEEGAN MOORE (Metropolitan State University Of Denver), Elizabeth Lukela (Metropolitan State University Of Denver), Mirka Jara Rivas (Metropolitan State University Of Denver), Mckenna Prynn (80230), Maureen Flynn (Metropolitan State University of Denver)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract: Using the same procedures, Hebert et al. (2019) and Flynn et al. (2022) found that a brief values intervention resulted in more approach behaviors in a contamination anxiety-related behavioral approach task (BAT). The aim of the current study was to partially replicate these studies to test the robustness of the findings by using a different BAT. Undergraduate participants (n = 231) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: values, tickets, and control. All participants first completed a series of questionnaires and a spider-related BAT (Cochrane et al., 2009). Next, participants received the intervention based on their condition and then completed the BAT a second time. Results showed that there was not a significant difference between conditions on BAT discrepancy scores (i.e., steps completed in the second BAT minus steps completed in the first BAT). One reason for this different finding may be related to the BAT task itself. Approximately 56% of the sample completed all 8 steps in the first BAT, meaning there was no room to improve post intervention. Future studies could use the same task but only include participants who completed fewer that seven steps in the first BAT in the main analyses.
 
70. Principal Component Analysis of Measurement of Parent-Child Interactions
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
LYNN SCHUMACHER (Mount St. Mary's University), Elizabeth Parthum (Mount St. Mary's University), Kwadwo Britwum (Mount Saint Mary's University), Eric Jacobs (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
Discussant: Thomas J. Waltz (Eastern Michigan University)
Abstract:

Measures of systematic social interactions are an effective way to evaluate contingencies between parent-child dyads in natural settings. Despite the utility of these measures, very few well established measurement instruments exist to validate the changes in these systematic interactions. The present study conducted a principal factor analysis of 38 cases of parent data collected using the Systematic Observation of Family Interactions (SOFI) instrument (Greene, 2020). Results revealed two main factors, with specific instrument target behavior clumping under these two factors. The findings imply that items under each factor with highest correlational values may be influenced by the same variables and as such, specific target behavior on the instrument may be eliminated to ensure a clear focus for data collectors. Further implications are also discussed while highlighting the utility of principal factor analysis in improving the focus of behavioral measures used in the natural environment situations.

 
72. Reinforcer Valuation, Alcohol Use, and Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in a Crowd-Sourced Sample
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
MARK JUSTIN RZESZUTEK (University of Kentucky College of Medicine), Mikhail Koffarnus (University of Kentucky College of Medicine)
Discussant: Thomas J. Waltz (Eastern Michigan University)
Abstract: Suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) and alcohol use are leading causes of physical, psychological, and societal suffering. Up to a third of suicide decedents have alcohol in their body at time of death, and alcohol use severity has been linked to STBs. Decision-making has been related to alcohol use and STBs, but little has been done to clarify exactly how. Behavioral economic demand is a measure of decision-making rooted in the operant tradition, whereby relative reinforcing value of a commodity is determined by consumption when it is free, and how much an individual is willing to defend consumption as effort to obtain it increases. We conducted a study using a crowdsourced sample and examined alcohol use, STBs, delay discounting, and demand for alcohol. Demand intensity and elasticity was related to suicide risk, while proportion of time drinking while experiencing an STB was correlated with proportion of time drinking and experiencing other STBs. Taken together, elevated alcohol demand may be an important marker of suicide risk, while alcohol may also act as a context for inducing STBs in a subset of people. Interrupting alcohol use for a subset of people therefore may also decrease STBs.
 
73. An Evaluation of an ACT-Based “Aging Resiliently” Group
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
DANA B. MORRIS (Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University), Elizabeth Hirschhorn (VA Puget Sound Health Care System, American Lake Division, Tacoma, WA, USA)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract: Objectives: There were two quality improvement aims in this project: (1) to evaluate the outcomes of a six-week closed geriatric focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)-based group called “Aging Resiliently” offered in a primary care setting, and (2) to obtain feedback from group members in order to make relevant modifications to future groups. Methods: Four cohorts of veterans ages 58 and older participated in the group (N = 17). Paired samples t-tests were computed to determine the significance of changes on pre- and post- self-report measures of depression, experiential avoidance, and life satisfaction. Veterans also provided feedback in the form of an open-ended feedback questionnaire. Results: There were statistically significant improvements in depressive symptoms and satisfaction with life, but not in experiential avoidance. Two major themes emerged from the feedback questionnaire about what group members found to be the most helpful: (1) self-reflection/values, and (2) the social process of the group. Conclusions: At our institution, the Aging Resiliently group yielded meaningful outcomes for older veterans presenting with different problems related to aging. Clinical Implications: This Aging Resiliently group proved to be a potential effective, feasible, and acceptable psychotherapy for older veterans in our established local primary care setting.
 
74. Using Brief Habit Reversal to Decrease Speech Disfluencies in Public Speaking – A Systematic Replication of Perrin et al. (2021)
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
Anja Göhring (University of Applied Sciences Würzburg-Schweinfurt), CHRISTOPH F. BÖRDLEIN (Technical University of Applied Sciences Würzburg-Schweinfurt (THWS))
Discussant: Thomas J. Waltz (Eastern Michigan University)
Abstract: This study evaluated brief habit reversal in reducing speech disfluencies such as filled pauses, filler words or tongue clicking that occur during public speaking. To extend prior research a previous study was replicated that conducted brief habit reversal in groups with an interdependent group contingency (Perrin et al., 2021). A total of nine students, divided into three groups, participated in this study. They delivered speeches of five minutes. The frequencies of speech disfluencies were documented. After baseline the participants received brief habit reversal, consisting of awareness training and the instruction of a competing response. The results showed that compared to baseline all participants reduced speech disfluencies during brief habit reversal. No group required booster sessions. The low rates of speech disfluencies were maintained during post sessions. At follow-up 2.5 to 6 weeks after training six of nine participants achieved a reduction of at least 80 percent from baseline. The social validity scores showed that the participants rated the treatment as acceptable and they would recommend it to others. In addition, they rated their own public speaking skills as better after the training.
 
75. A Comparative Analysis of Verbal and Self-Image Prompts in the Acquisition of Proper Body Placement for Bear Holds
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
JESSICA TRUETT (University of West Florida), Shane Kelly (University of West Florida)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract:

Core stability protects individuals from injury and can support the movement of smaller muscle group movements such as hand, shoulder, and ankle movements (Kobesova et al., 2014). To strengthen the core muscles Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) paradigms can be used to train older individuals in core stability in the same order of infant development (Kobesova et al., 2014). The DNS model targets the natural progression of stability through functional movement pattern exercises such as the bear hold. In physical therapy, the bear hold is part of a progression to strengthen and correct major muscle groups to recover from and reduce risk of further injury. Physical therapy professionals use this exercise to target stability and is applicable in many cases to measure and increase strength with recovering injuries. While this exercise is quite common in physical therapy, there is usually confusion and frustration for the people receiving therapy about how to properly get into the position and maintain the correct form. Possible support provided during therapy includes verbal prompts for correct form or mirror image. The presented study will measure the correct body placement during a bear hold with verbal prompting compared to a video mirror image.

 
166. Primary Care Staff Behavioral Skills on the Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) Intervention Guide Adoption
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
VIOLETA FÉLIX ROMERO (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico), Silvia Morales-Chaine (National Autonomous University of Mexico)
Discussant: Thomas J. Waltz (Eastern Michigan University)
Abstract:

Purpose: We developed and evaluated an online training program for the mhGAP Intervention Guide. Methods: Nine hundred and seventy-five health professionals in Mexico were enrolled in the training program, most of them during the period of social distancing brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants completed a pre-post online evaluation strategy including Knowledge screening, assessment of Learning Activities, and performance in Programmed-Simulated cases to evaluate knowledge and skills for the assessment, management, and follow-up of Mental, Neurological and Substance Use Disorders. Results: We found that participants improved their knowledge and skills from training on the mhGAP online course. Notably we observed these positive results regardless of sex, profession, institution, or social vulnerability rating of participants, suggesting that this is a relevant training program for primary care staff. Conclusions: These results contribute to the Mental Health Gap Action Programme and advance the use of online teaching and evaluation technologies in this field.

 
167. A Behavior-Analytic Approach to Couple Therapy: An Evaluation of Functional Behavior Assessment Training and Social Validity to Address Problem Behaviors with Couples
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
NICOLE KANEW (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Julie A. Ackerlund Brandt (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology ), Crystal Fields (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Amanda Mahoney (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology ), Susan D. Flynn (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Abstract:

A common approach to address relationship dissatisfaction and problem behaviors within couples includes couple therapy. Few studies, especially within recent literature, have examined the application of solely behavior analytic methods to address problem behaviors with couples. The purpose of this study was to extend the use of functional behavior assessments and behavior intervention plans to the behaviors of neurotypically developing adults in committed relationships by teaching dyads of partners how to a) conduct behavior assessments, b) select evidence-based interventions and c) then apply the taught skills to target behaviors. Application of virtual didactic training as well as modules was implemented with couple dyads to teach FBA methods and intervention selection. Dyads self-administered FBAs and selected evidence-based interventions based on the results of the assessment. Results included that couples were able to increase their knowledge base of behavior analytic concepts post-training as well as demonstrated a decrease in rate per day of target problem behaviors. Cohabitation pre- and post-questionnaires indicated an increase in individual and partner roles as well as an increase in environmental satisfaction for four of six participants. Social validity measures indicated that participants found the training to be time sensitive and easy to follow. However, full assessment and ongoing data collection was considered to be more challenging to implement and require more response effort. These findings have important implications for extending the scope of application of ABA methods to a variety of populations.

 
 

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