IT should be notified now!

Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search
Donate to SABA Capital Campaign
Portal Access Behavior Analysis Training Directory Contact the Hotline View Frequently Asked Question
ABAI Facebook Page Follow us on Twitter LinkedIn LinkedIn

42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Event Details

Previous Page

 

Symposium #299
CE Offered: BACB
Recent Joint Control Research
Monday, May 30, 2016
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Michigan ABC, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: VRB/DDA
CE Instructor: Joyce C. Tu, Ed.D.
Chair: David W. Sidener (Garden Academy)
Discussant: Joyce C. Tu (Center for Behavioral Sciences, Inc.)
Abstract: Joint control (Lowenkron, 2005) is explained as an event when a verbal topography currently evoked by one stimulus is also evoked by a second stimulus. In the first presentation, several studies of joint control and it's role in listener responding will be discussed. In addition, several new directions for joint control will be suggested, including applied research. Three joint control research studies will also be included in this symposium. In the first study, joint control methods were used to teach manded selection responses with three children diagnosed with autism. Second, joint control was used as a method to generate novel responding in three individuals with disabilities. And finally, joint control methods were used to teach children to count objects from a larger set (e.g., count 15 from a group of 25 objects) by introducing a verbal mediating response with response product, then gradually fading the presence of the added stimulus.
Keyword(s): Generative Responding, Joint control, Listener responding, Verbal Behavior
Recent Joint Control Research and Suggestions for Additional Research Topics
DAVID W. SIDENER (Garden Academy), Joyce C. Tu (Center for Behavioral Sciences, Inc.), Lauren Sinning (Garden Academy)
Abstract: In a series of papers, Lowenkron and colleagues described a model they referred to as joint control. As described by Lowenkron (2004) the joint control event occurs when a verbal topography currently evoked by one stimulus is also evoked by a second stimulus. That is, the speaker “says” something, sometimes covertly, evoked by one stimulus, then says the same thing but evoked by another stimulus. In the language of verbal behavior, the speaker may be said to emit one verbal operant topography (e.g., “push the green switch”) then when she can emit the same topography as before but as a different operant (as a tact – “There’s the green one!”) the match then jointly controls some other kind of behavior such as a selection response. Several published examinations of this phenomenon have looked at various types of match to sample and listener responding preparations. Recent research is reviewed and, building on that, several new directions for joint control research are suggested, including applied research.
The Role of Joint Control in the Acquisition of Listener Responses
ELISA SAHAGUN (Center for Behavioral Sciences, Inc.), Alex Silva (Center for Behavioral Sciences, Inc.)
Abstract: The purpose of the study is to teach manded selection responses through joint control training to children diagnosed with autism. The goal of this study is to evaluate the role of joint control in teaching selection responses in children with autism. This research investigates the effectiveness of joint control training in teaching selection responses and if self-echoic and tact skills alone will be sufficient in producing name-object responses. Joint control were taught to children with autism such as to echo, tact, and use these two skills jointly to emit correct selection behaviors. The finding demonstrated that echoic and tact training alone did not result in generalized selection response; it was only when the participants were taught to emit the two verbal responses (self-echoic and tact) jointly that the performance in manded selection behavior improved significantly.
Joint Control as Another Generative Strategy When Teaching Novel Manded Selection Responses and Tact to Children With Autism
RONALD MORENO (Center for Behavioral Sciences, Inc.), HaeRim Choun (Center for Behavioral Sciences, Inc.), Kelly Montague (Center for Behavioral Sciences, Inc.)
Abstract: Joint control was used as a method to generate novel responding in three individuals with disabilities. In the training phase, the experimenter taught the participants to select components (nouns, verbs, actions, colors, and objects) of four pictures using joint control. That is, the participants first echo the name of the specific component emitted by the experimenter (e.g., Beige), then select the appropriate picture with the specific component, and finally, tact the specific component. Each component was taught until 80% or higher accuracy was reached. Then the experimenter tested for generative responding in both the manded selection and tact repertoire. The result showed that the participants were able to select and tact the pictures using combination of the components taught in joint control. For example, Man reading a beige magazine. This study shows that joint control can be an additional way to generate novel untrained/unreinforced responses in individuals with disabilities.
Behavioral Mediation of Remote Responding: Exploring Other Applications of Joint Control
David W. Sidener (Garden Academy), LAUREN SINNING (Garden Academy), Samantha Lockhart (Garden Academy)
Abstract: A small but growing group of studies is providing increasing support for behavioral mediation of various matching and other discrimination tasks. In the current examination, we attempted to use joint control methods to teach children to count objects from a larger set (e.g., count 15 from a group of 25 objects) by introducing a verbal mediating response with response product, then gradually fading the presence of the added stimulus. Preliminary findings indicate that for children who could rote count beyond 30 but could not reliably count a specified number from a larger set, the introduction and subsequent fading of a written mediating stimulus may be an effective method to teach remote (e.g., not immediate) tasks like counting.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

Modifed by Eddie Soh