Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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49th Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2023

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Poster Session #206C
CBM Sunday Poster Session
Sunday, May 28, 2023
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Convention Center, Exhibit Hall F
Chair: Gladis Lee Pereira Xavier (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
Diversity submission 61. Cultural Responsiveness and Contingency Management for Alcohol and Substance Use Disorders
Area: CBM; Domain: Theory
HAILEY EVELYN DONOHUE (University of Florida), Jesse Dallery (University of Florida)
Discussant: Gladis Lee Pereira
Abstract: It is important to consider cultural factors in the delivery of behavior analytic services. In fact, practicing cultural responsiveness is now required by the Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts. We sought to understand the extent to which cultural considerations have been discussed in the context of contingency management (CM) interventions for alcohol and substance use disorders. We conducted a literature search of APA PsycInfo and PubMed databases. Key search terms included “cultural,” “contingency management,” “race,” “ethnicity” and “minority.” Literature was included in the review which discussed considerations for contingency management programs with respect to cultural responsiveness, with or without directly implementing contingency management. A subsequent citation search was conducted to capture potential missed sources. Results suggest that CM may be equally effective across sociodemographic categories, and racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities. Only a few studies have explicitly tailored CM based on cultural factors. Culturally responsive CM interventions may improve uptake and acceptability, but more research is needed.
 
62. Improving Chopstick Use by Non-dominant Hand in Mealtime for Elderly Persons: Home-Based Intervention With Self-Recording
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
JUN'ICHI YAMAMOTO (Tokyo Metropolitan University, Faculty of Systems Design), Satoru Sekine (The University of Tokyo), Yuji Morio (Shonan University of Medical Sciences), Mikayo Omori (St. Marianna University School of Medicine Hospital), Yoshitsugu Omori (Shonan University of Medical Sciences; Tokyo Metropolitan University)
Discussant: Marisela Alicia Aguilar (West Virginia University)
Abstract: Study Objective: The present study examined whether the everyday chopstick use of non-dominant hand with self -recording would improve the general hand movement skills. This research would contribute to the basic data for behavioral rehabilitation in the elderly persons and was approved by IRB. Participants: Three elderly persons, 72, 84 and 85 years old, with no motor deficits participated in this study. Research Design: We applied quasi single subject research design, pre- and post- assessments including daily evaluation. Independent Variables: Participants were required to take a meal with chopstick using non-dominant hand at home for 2 or 4 weeks. As the self-recording method, they were required to check Likert Scale Score (1-10) concerning “difficulty” and “expectation of good performance at next day” after taking a meal every day. Dependent Measures: Numbers of plastic chips which the participants moved from left (right) to right (left) bowl in one minute using non-dominant hand were measured. Everyday Likert scores were also measured. Results: The “difficulty” score decreased and ”positive expectation” increased, gradually. Numbers of chips moved increased for 2 out of 3 participants. Conclusion: Daily practice with self-recording improved accuracy and fluency of newly acquired fine motor skills.
 
63. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Digital Social Incentive System in Treatment of Substance Use Disorders
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
LINDSEY ANNE IVES (University of Florida), Matthew Serel (You Are Accountable), AJ Diaz (You Are Accountable), Linda A. LeBlanc (LeBlanc Behavioral Consulting LLC), Jesse Dallery (University of Florida)
Discussant: Gladis Lee Pereira
Abstract: The majority of individuals with a substance use disorder (SUD) will relapse after residential treatment. Contingency management (CM) has demonstrated considerable success in the treatment of SUDs and has been cited as the most efficacious psychosocial intervention for promoting drug abstinence. Traditional implementation of CM involves the provision of monetary incentives contingent on biochemically verified abstinence. One limitation to the widespread adoption of CM is the cost associated with monetary incentives. Social incentives may present a viable alternative to monetary incentives. We developed a social incentive system within a digital recovery platform that arranges the provision of social incentives from friends, family, and clinicians for verified abstinence and recovery-related goal completion. This study identified that the social incentive system is both feasible (toxicology and goal reports can be shared through the platform and social incentives from care team delivered immediately) and acceptable (high ratings obtained from the system usability scale and treatment acceptability questionnaire). These results suggest that a digital CM program using social incentives holds promise as a way to prevent relapse following residential treatment for SUDs.
 
65. Personalized Contingency Management for Vaping Cessation
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
ALEXANDRA KNERR (University of Florida), Jesse Dallery (University of Florida)
Discussant: Gladis Lee Pereira
Abstract: E-cigarette use has rapidly increased over the last decade, especially among young adults. Contingency management is an incentive-based intervention that has been effective in promoting abstinence from e-cigarettes, tobacco products, and a variety of other drugs of abuse. Contingency management is effective for diverse populations, when delivered either in person or remotely, and with a variety of different incentives. Tailoring the treatment components of contingency management has been suggested to increase both the effectiveness and acceptability of the intervention. However, there is a lack empirical evidence exploring the effects of tailored contingency management methods, as well as a lack of guidelines on how to best tailor a contingency management intervention for an individual client. This study evaluated tailored contingency management to promote abstinence from nicotine-containing e-cigarettes (i.e., vaping abstinence) among young adults. Tailored components included the quit date, incentive, incentive delivery system, meeting frequency, meeting format, and additional supports. Participants also provided and managed their own incentive. Preliminary results have been promising: one participant successfully quit vaping through eight weeks with a personal intervention plan using TikTok as the incentive, and rated the intervention highly. These tailoring methods may be useful when developing contingency management interventions.
 
66. Evaluating Outcome Measure Data From a Hybrid Intensive Interdisciplinary Pediatric Feeding Disorder Program
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
ASHLEY ANDERSEN (Clinic 4 Kidz), Meeta R. Patel (Clinic 4 Kidz & Stanford University School of Medicine ), Aida Miles (Clinic 4 Kidz)
Discussant: Marisela Alicia Aguilar (West Virginia University)
Abstract: Treatment for pediatric feeding disorders often takes place in a clinic, either day-treatment or inpatient; however, recent research has shown that treatment can successfully be carried out via telehealth or in patients’ homes. In this poster, we describe a novel hybrid, telehealth and home-based program to treat feeding problems which captures the benefits of both models. We will describe this program and compare preliminary outcomes from the hybrid model to outcomes from the home-based only model. We will evaluate oral intake, tube feeding elimination, and weight for a patient who was dependent on tube feedings. In addition, we will analyze weight data for a patient who was failure to thrive. Last, we will present the number of foods consumed for a patient who was food selective. Preliminary data from the hybrid model suggest that patients achieved similar outcomes of tube elimination, growth, and increase in variety in a similar amount of time when compared to the home-based only model. Results will be discussed in relation to family preference, rate of progress, outcomes, staff preference, and feasibility.
 
67. Effects of Actual Eating Practice Using Chopsticks With a Non-dominant Hand in Daily Life on Fine Motor Skills in Older People
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
YOSHITSUGU OMORI (Faculty of Medical Sciences, Shonan University of Medical Sciences/ Tokyo Metropolitan University), Yuji Morio (Shonan University of Medical Sciences), Satoru Sekine (The University of Tokyo), Mikayo Omori (St. Marianna University School of Medicine Hospital), Jun'ichi Yamamoto (Tokyo Metropolitan University, Faculty of Systems Design)
Discussant: Gladis Lee Pereira
Abstract: Study Objective: This study examined the effects of actual eating practice using chopsticks with the non-dominant hand in daily life on generalized chopsticks manipulation in older persons. Participants: Six (54-79 years old) and seven (80-88 years old) persons participated in this study. They were right-handed, with no motor deficits. Research Design: Pre-post comparative design was implemented. Independent Variables: The intervention consisted of actual eating at least one meal each day for 2 or 4 weeks using chopsticks with the left (non-dominant) hand at home. Dependent Measures: The number of plastic chips that the participants moved between 2 bowls in one minute using chopsticks with the left hand was measured at pre- and post-assessment. Likert Scale Scores (1-10) concerning “difficulty” and “fatigue” in actual eating with left hand were also evaluated. Results: As for fine motor chopstick skills, 83% of “< 80 years old” persons and 43% of “80? years old” persons moved chips more in post- than pre-assessment. As for “difficulty” and “fatigue” scales in actual eating, decrease was clear in “< 80 years old” and was little in “80? years old” persons. Conclusions: New fine motor learning and behavioral fluency can be achieved in older people.
 
68. Virtual Realty System of Real-Time Visual Prompt Fading for Rehabilitation
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
NAOKI ISO (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Takuhiro Okabe (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Kilchoon Cho (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Kazuo Saito (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Takako Suzuki (School of Health Sciences, Saitama Prefectural University), Yusuke Maeda (School of Health Sciences at Odawara, International University of Health and Welfare), Jun'ichi Yamamoto (Tokyo Metropolitan University, Faculty of Systems Design), Makoto Suzuki (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University; Faculty of Systems Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University)
Discussant: Marisela Alicia Aguilar (West Virginia University)
Abstract: Objective: Despite widespread use of visual prompt fading at rehabilitation, it is still difficult to fade out/in the prompt appropriately during behavior practice. Therefore, this study aimed to develop new virtual reality system (Vractice) for real-time visual prompt fading for target behavior such as reaching, and determine the validity of Vractice. Methods: In Vractice, trackers were attached to the wrist and elbow of the participant, and three-dimensional body coordinates were recorded by optical sensor. The difference in the coordinates between the target avatar and the participant’s avatar was calculated. The transparency of the target avatar was changed (i.e., visual prompt fading) by the difference in the coordinates (x, y, z). Participant is a healthy university student. We compared the participant’s coordinates without fading among Vractice and standard motion capture system (VICON) for validity assessment. Results: Bland-Altman-plots among Vractice and VICON showed the 92–94% difference values were within two standard deviations of the mean. Additionally, the difference in coordinates between Vractice and VICON was within 7 mm. Conclusion: The Vractice, which includes real-time visual prompt fading, showed validity. The Vractice may serve as a meaningful tool for shaping behaviors of patients with motor disorder.
 
69. Adjustment of Physical Guidance Trajectory in Response to Behavioral Disturbance in Upper Limb Rehabilitation
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
AMI KUWABARA (Graduate School Humanities and Life Sciences,Tokyo Kasei University), Makoto Suzuki (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University; Faculty of Systems Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University), Yusuke Maeda (School of Health Sciences at Odawara, International University of Health and Welfare), Kazuo Saito (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Takuhiro Okabe (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Kilchoon Cho (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Naoki Iso (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Jun'ichi Yamamoto (Tokyo Metropolitan University, Faculty of Systems Design)
Discussant: Gladis Lee Pereira
Abstract: Objective: Despite widespread use of physical guidance at rehabilitation, it remains unclear how professional therapists guide the patient’s body. Therefore, we aimed to quantitatively identify changes in behavioral trajectories of professional therapist in response to behavioral disturbance of the target person during physical guidance. Methods: One healthy young adult (guided person) and one professional therapist (guiding person) participated in our study. We instructed the guided and guiding participants to keep their right arms relaxed throughout the guidance, and to perform right elbow flexions and extensions as accurately as possible so that the index fingertip was near and far the light-emitting diode lamp. We delivered the 200 µs-electric stimulation for the right biceps brachii muscle at 0.5 s after the near-lamp blink for behavioral disturbance, and recorded guided parson’s motion trajectory measured by motion capture system as dependent variable. The stimulation was within safety range confirmed by previous studies Results: The difference of identity and actual behavior trajectories decreased over time for lateral and longitudinal directions. Additionally, time-course changes in physical guidance trajectories were associated with the state-change model; the order of the model were 100–370 ms. Conclusion: We quantitatively measured the effect of physical guidance of the professional therapist adjusting the 100–370-ms time lag after disturbance.
 
70. Implementing Behavioral Procedures in a Closed Psychiatric Inpatient Ward – The Sheba Medical Center Model
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
EITAN ELDAR (Psychiatry Department, Sheba Health Center, Israel), Doron Gothelf (Tel Aviv University)
Discussant: Marisela Alicia Aguilar (West Virginia University)
Abstract: The Children Psychiatry Department at the Sheba Health Center offers a pioneering model of collaboration between Psychiatry and Applied Behavior Analysis. Patients are six to twelve years old children experiencing complex behavioral challenges requiring intensive and professional care. Among the challenges are self-injury, social and school difficulties, psychotic and medical issues. Children reside at the department for a few weeks up to three months. Staff include Psychiatrists, Nurses, Psychologists, Social Workers, Teachers, Speech Therapists, Behavior Analysts and Dieticians. The department hosts a school supervised by the Ministry of Education and supports an Applied Behavior Analysis training program enabling students to experience practicum, beneficiary to both. The Behavioral program includes a “growth ladder” for each child, based on a Token Economy system supporting target behaviors defined by the Psychiatrists. It also includes individual interventions such as functional communication training, differential reinforcement, gradual exposure to frustrating triggers and practicing self-control. The Behavioral model will be presented, followed by progress data indicated by tokens accumulation percentage for three children. Key challenges related to the model’s implementation will be highlighted.
 
161. Examining the Presence of Applied Behaviour Analysis Within Behavioural Gerontology: Education, Advocacy and Dissemination
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
KRISTIN GRANT (Brock University), Jisan Phillips (George Brown College)
Discussant: Gladis Lee Pereira (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
Abstract:

Applied Behaviour Analysis is most recognized in its application to children with autism. However, ABA provides behavioural supports to several other populations. Behaviour Analysts are tasked with building capacity, providing education, and championing advocacy efforts with populations who would benefit accessing much needed behavioural interventions. With the number of Board-Certified Behaviour Analysts seeing a 7,317% increase from 2001-2021, the duty lies within the growing profession to ensure that the application of the science of behaviour analysis is effectively disseminated, particularly amongst gerontological populations. A literature review was conducted to determine the current presence, gaps, and needs when considering the practice of behaviour analysis within gerontological supports, specifically amongst seniors with dementia. Behaviour analysis is scarcely present within this realm of support, with much literature and research indicating that gaps can continue to be filled with the growing practice of the science. Behaviour analysts can contribute to the holistic, person-centred approach to care when supporting seniors with a diagnosis of dementia. Through this literature review, current applications were examined, along with considerations around the presence of other allied clinicians within gerontological supports to determine how behaviour analysts can continue to be recognized as crucial members of this network of support.

 
 

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