Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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49th Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2023

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Poster Session #206B
BPN Sunday Poster Session
Sunday, May 28, 2023
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Convention Center, Exhibit Hall F
Chair: Haily Traxler (University of Kentucky)
57. Neural Correlates of Facilitation and Inhibition in Go/No-Go Procedure in Discriminative Operant Conditioning
Area: BPN; Domain: Basic Research
YUYU FUJITA (Graduate School of Humanities and Life Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Makoto Suzuki (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University; Faculty of Systems Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University), Kazuo Saito (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Kilchoon Cho (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Naoki Iso (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Takuhiro Okabe (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Takako Suzuki (School of Health Sciences, Saitama Prefectural University), Jun'ichi Yamamoto (Tokyo Metropolitan University, Faculty of Systems Design)
Discussant: Haily Traxler (University of Kentucky)
Abstract:

Objective: Discriminative learning in operant conditioning is the process which changing neural activity and behavior to gain reinforcement under discriminative stimulus. However, time courses of changes in neural oscillations and behaviors with discriminative operant conditioning remain controversial. Therefore, we aimed to quantitatively identify time course of changes in neural oscillations and behaviors during discriminative operant conditioning in the context of behavioral and neural relationship. Methods: One healthy young adult participated in our single-case study. Each trial began with one of two beeps including high and low tones for 500 ms. The participant was instructed to press a button as quickly as possible in response to low tone beep. After the button press, “Correct” or “Incorrect” was presented for 1.5 s as feedback. Dependent neural and behavioral variables were electroencephalography, reaction time, and omission and commission errors. Results: The inhibition of theta oscillations at F4 of the 10–20 International System reflecting frontal gyrus right before button press and no-button press decreased with discriminative operant conditioning, indicating disinhibition. Additionally, the amplitude of theta oscillations at F4 before button press was higher than no-button press. Conclusion: These results imply that theta oscillation specifically changes during Go/No-Go procedure in discriminative leaning.

 
58. Synchronization of Rhythmic Operant Reaching and Brain Stimulation: Toward the Integration of Behavioral and Neural Intervention in Rehabilitation
Area: BPN; Domain: Applied Research
NANAKA ARIHARA (Graduate School of Humanities and Life Sciences Tokyo Kasei University), Makoto Suzuki (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University; Faculty of Systems Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University), Naoki Iso (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Yusuke Maeda (School of Health Sciences at Odawara, International University of Health and Welfare), Kazuo Saito (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Takuhiro Okabe (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Kilchoon Cho (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Jun'ichi Yamamoto (Tokyo Metropolitan University, Faculty of Systems Design)
Discussant: Jeremy Saul Langford (West Virginia University)
Abstract:

Objective: We hypothesized that if brain stimulation affects operant behavior, then rhythmic brain stimulation should entrain the behavioral rhythm. We examined how modulatory effects occur when pairing operant behavior with brain stimulation. This would lead to effective rehabilitation method. Methods: One healthy young and one healthy older adult participated in our study with AB design. The participants wore the virtual-reality device and were instructed to perform rhythmic elbow flexion and extension in accordance with the dynamic virtual target hand in virtual reality. In baseline condition, the participant perform rhythmic elbow flexion and extension without brain stimulation. In intervention phase, the alternating current stimulation was delivered to the cerebellum at a frequency of 0.5 Hz with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 2 mA during rhythmic behaviors. This study was approved by IRB, and the stimulation was within safety range confirmed by previous studies. Results: For both young and older adults, 0.5 Hz-behavioral oscillations were decreased during baseline phase, whereas 0.5 Hz-behavioral oscillations were recovered in intervention phase. Conclusion: These results imply that rhythmic brain stimulation can enhance the behavioral rhythm in the context of pairing brain stimulation with operant behavior.

 
59. Would EEG Be a Precursor of The Response to Human Emotion? Toward The Basic Mechanism of Respondent Conditioning
Area: BPN; Domain: Basic Research
NAHIRO BEPPU (Graduate School of Humanities and Life Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Makoto Suzuki (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University; Faculty of Systems Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University), Kilchoon Cho (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Kazuo Saito (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Naoki Iso (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Takuhiro Okabe ( Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Takuya Matsumoto (Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Kasei University), Jun'ichi Yamamoto (Tokyo Metropolitan University, Faculty of Systems Design)
Discussant: Haily Traxler (University of Kentucky)
Abstract:

Objective: The respondent conditioning associated with other person’s negative facial expressions including angry and disgust can cause anxiety and nervous responses. However, it is still difficult to objectively actualize the anxiety and nervous responses. If precursor of anxiety and nervous responses reflecting other person’s negative facial expressions is actualized, this knowledge could help patients and clinicians improving positive behaviors. We therefore investigated a precursor of anxiety and nervous responses reflecting other person’s negative facial expressions in the context of behavioral and neural relationship. Methods: One healthy young adult participated in our study. Each trial began with a cue (blue fixation cross), followed by one of tree facial-expression pictures including neutral, angry and disgust expressions for 2 s: each 50 trials contained neutral, angry, or disgust. Dependent neural and behavioral variables were electroencephalography (EEG) and anxiety and nervous scores. Results: The coherences between occipital and frontal brain oscillations for other person’s angry and disgust facial expressions were higher than that for other person’s neutral facial expression. Conclusion: These results imply that the electroencephalography can be a precursor of anxiety and nervous responses reflecting other person’s negative facial expressions as the basic mechanism of respondent conditioning.

 
60. Evaluating Two Remote Incentive-Based Interventions to Promote Buprenorphine Adherence and Abstinence From Illicit Opioids
Area: BPN; Domain: Applied Research
FORREST TOEGEL (Northern Michigan University), Matthew Novak (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine), Mackenzie Baranski (Northern Michigan University), Andrew Rodewald (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine), Kenneth Silverman (Johns Hopkins University), August F. Holtyn (National Institutes of Health)
Discussant: Jeremy Saul Langford (West Virginia University)
Abstract:

Buprenorphine is an FDA-approved medication for opioid use disorder that can reduce opioid use and risk of overdose, but many individuals who could benefit from buprenorphine treatment discontinue treatment, divert buprenorphine for illicit use, or continue to use illicit opioids during buprenorphine treatment. The present research evaluated the effectiveness of two incentive-based interventions in promoting adherence to office-based buprenorphine treatment and reducing illicit opioid use among adults with opioid use disorder. Participants (N=375) were randomly assigned to three groups that received (a) standard care, (b) daily incentives for adhering to buprenorphine, or (c) daily incentives for adhering to buprenorphine and being abstinent from opiates. Daily buprenorphine adherence and opiate abstinence were monitored using a commercially available video directly observed therapy platform and incentives were delivered remotely using that platform. Participants in all groups completed assessments every month during the 3-month study period and every 3 months during a 9-month follow-up period. We are in the process of analyzing individual results and group differences in several outcomes including buprenorphine adherence, opiate abstinence, buprenorphine diversion, overdose risk, patient treatment satisfaction, and post-intervention effects. Results of our analyses will be discussed, as will implications for practice and future clinical research.

 
 

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