Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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49th Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2023

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Poster Session #370H
EDC Monday Poster Session
Monday, May 29, 2023
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Convention Center, Exhibit Hall F
Chair: Sunny Kim (University of California, Santa Barbara )
Diversity submission 117. Using Video Self-Modeling as a Reading Intervention for Dual-Identified Learners
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
SARATESSA PALOS (Santino Consulting, LLC. )
Discussant: Sunny Kim (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Abstract: The present study is centered on investigating the use of Video Self-Modeling to improve reading for dual-identified students; That is learners classified as English Language Learners who receive special education support and services under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). Golloher et al. (2018) identified that current systems in public schools do not consistently meet the needs of multilingual learners with disabilities. A body of research indicates the efficacy of Video Self-Modeling (VSM) as an academic intervention for learners with disabilities (Ayala & O’Connor 2013; Edwards & Lambros, 2018; Kellems & Edwards, 2016). Building on this work, the researcher sought to answer the following research question: is VSM an efficacious intervention for dual-identified students? The present study took place with two dual-identified first grade learners in an urban public school over the course of eight weeks. The researcher employed VSM for the development of foundational reading skills, specifically, phonological awareness and phonics. Learners were recorded being prompted through a procedure of decoding and blending words, the video was then edited to display the learner accurately performing the behavior without teacher prompting, the learners were then shown the video and observed themselves performing the task independently, learners were then asked to perform the task independently after viewing the VSM. Preliminary findings suggest that VSM was an effective intervention, and was preferred by learners, but potentially too time consuming or tedious for teachers in urban public schools.
 
118. Increasing Retell Narrative Skills by Teaching Basic Story Structure to Children in Special Education in Iceland
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
HANNA STEINUNN STEINGRIMSDOTTIR (Reykjavik University), Anna Ágústsdóttir (Reykjavík University)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract:

Establishing and evolving narrative skills is an important factor in a child's development and future academic and personal success. Story Champs is a multi-tiered language intervention curriculum whose main purpose is to develop language skills systematically. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a newly translated Story Champs curriculum targeting the Basic Story Structure – Retell, with three adolescents in a special education setting using multiple probe design across participants. Participants were exposed to 12 simple stories with five training phases within each lesson, targeting five components within a story: Character, Problem, Action, Feeling, and Ending. Results suggest that overall basic story structure retell narrative skills increased for all students. Retell narrative skills for two students were maintained over a month period and above baseline for one. Notably, since basic story structure narrative skills are complex, many variables within the environment and participants' history can affect the presentation of each component in students' retell. This is the first experiment in Iceland where the effect of Story Champs is studied. Further research should focus on evaluating each phase of the lesson plan and if setting mastery criteria before phase change will further affect the generalization probe. Keywords: Narrative Skills, Story Champs, Macrostructure, Story Grammar Components, Retell, Special Education.

 
120. Delay Discounting of Classroom Management Procedures
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
ALLYSSA MINICK (Endicott College), Zhihui Yi (Univeristy of Illinois at Chicago), Jennifer Posey (Endicott College), Mark R. Dixon (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract: Current educational standards promote a least-intrusive intervention approach, whereby students with disabilities are to be included in general education opportunities as much as possible. General education teachers are now faced with increased work demands due to the need to differentiate instructional content across a wider range of ability levels. This sometimes results in shortcuts, where punitive measures are used, rather than positive. Thirty special education teachers participated in this study which examined their choices when given options between shortcuts that save time, and lengthier interventions which may be more advantageous for student growth. Teachers were asked a series of questions that range in risk and delays to success and vary these parameters over successive questioning. This data will show teachers' indifference point. This information is valuable because it helps school support staff know when teachers are potentially no longer willing to implement behavior intervention plans. With this knowledge, support staff and administrators can go to teachers during these key points and provide support, feedback, and reinforcement to the teachers for implementation.
 
Diversity submission 122. The Perceived Impact of Common Implementation Errors When Using Precision Teaching: Views From Experts in the Field
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
SHAUNA DIFFLEY ( University of Galway), Aoife McTiernan (University of Galway), Rick M. Kubina (Penn State), Chris Noone (University of Galway)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract:

Precision Teaching (PT) is a highly effective system for accelerating learning and promoting fluency across academic skills (Gist & Bulla, 2020; McTiernan et al., 2021). Despite this, its use in public schools is minimal (Gist & Bulla, 2020). Setting achievable implementation goals for teachers may be one means to increase the impact of PT in public schools. Although 100% treatment fidelity is ideal it is not necessarily achievable in non-experimental settings like busy classrooms, and may not always be necessary (Brand et al., 2019). This project aimed to explore the perspectives of experts in the field of PT in relation to (a) their understanding of treatment fidelity in practice, (b) common implementation errors that occur when implementing PT and (c) the perceived impact that these errors have on learner outcomes. This study employed qualitative research methods. Nine experts participated in semi-structured interviews with the primary investigator. Data was analysed using template thematic analysis (King & Brooks 2017; 2018). Codes and themes include components of the PT system, error type such as omission and commission errors and impact on learner outcomes.

 
123. Using Behavior Skills Training and Acceptance and Commitment Training to Increase Student Engagement in Art
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
AMELIA NICIE TRAIL (Mount St. Mary's University), Julie CROCHET (Mount St. Mary's University), Elizabeth Parthum (Mount St. Mary's University), Leora Ezri (Mount St. Mary's University), Kwadwo O. Britwum (Mount Saint Mary's University)
Discussant: Sunny Kim (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Abstract: Behavioral skills training (BST) is an effective way to teach diverse skills to individuals of different age groups. Recent studies have shown that Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), which is a treatment that integrates mindfulness and behavior change processes, can enhance the effects of BST. Despite the beneficial outcomes of studies utilizing BST and ACT, none have evaluated these effects on student behavior in art class. The current study evaluated the efficacy of a brief BST and ACT intervention on student engagement during primary grade art classes. A concurrent multiple baseline across classrooms was used to evaluate the effects of the intervention. Each classroom consisted of an average of 25 students seated at tables in groups of four to five. Student engagement was measured using a Planned Activity Check Sheet (PLACHECK). Results provide useful implications for the use of BST plus ACT in general academic instruction.
 
124. Preparing Young Learners with Complex Needs for Participation in a Fully Inclusive Education Setting
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
SHAUNA HOEKSTRA (Algonquin and Lakeshore CDSB), Katie Bremner (Algonquin and Lakeshore CDSB), Katie Deir (Algonquin and Lakeshore CDSB)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract:

This research builds on the past 3 years of running the Ready Set School program. The program endeavours to assess and teach skills to young learners with complex needs. Further, work with the school team to ensure generalization and maintenance of these skills once school starts. This research will use evidence-based applied behaviour analytic programs including, Preschool Life Skills Curriculum (Hanley, 2007), a verbal behaviour approach (Barbera & Rasmussen, 2007), and Socially Savvy (Ellis & Almedia, 2015) to teach the skills that may be less well developed in young learners with complex neurodiverse needs. The Ages and Stages Questionnaire (Squires et al., 2015) is completed with each family and a service plan created that will guide the family and school with recommendations for next steps. The intervention included 14 subjects with complex needs identified in the transition to school process. The participants were between ages 3 and 5 years and were integrating into a full day education setting. The program took place over 8 intervention sessions during the summer with follow up with the family and school team to ensure a smooth transition into a fully inclusive Kindergarten classroom in the fall.

 
125. Training Group Home Staff on Trauma-Informed Care
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
ALYSSA LUZ (Master of Applied Disability Studies in Applied Behaviour Analysis Board Certified Behaviour Analyst Vita Community Living Services), Meredith Tater (Master of Applied Disability Studies in Applied Behaviour Analysis Board Certified Behaviour Analyst Vita Community Living Services)
Discussant: Sunny Kim (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Abstract:

Front-line staff training in trauma-informed care is vital when supporting individuals with a trauma history to avoid re-traumatization and ensure their safety is prioritized. It is specifically an area of focus in group homes for individuals with dual diagnoses as their likelihood of experiencing trauma in their lifetime is higher than the typical population. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of behaviour skills training (BST) in increasing staff competency of trauma-informed care across two group homes using an A-B Design (pre-post test). The results of the study indicate that BST is effective at increasing staff competency of trauma-informed care.

 
126. Effects of a Function-Based Intervention on Children’s School Refusal Behavior in Iceland
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Ásdís Einarsdóttir (Reykjavík University), Berglind Sveinbjornsdottir (Reykjavik University)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract:

School refusal is a problem in Iceland and if non-attendance goes over certain criteria child protective services (CPS) must be contacted. The School-Refusal Assessment Scale- Revised (SRAS-R) is a scale that assesses school refusal behaviors with a function-based approach. The present study investigated the effects of a function-based intervention on children ‘s school refusal behavior in Iceland. Participants were 3 children who emitted school refusal behaviors prior to school in the mornings. Parents, children, and their teachers did an open- ended interview, and parents and their children answered the SRAS-R to assess the function of the school refusal behaviors. The results from the open-ended interviews and SRAS-R were used to formulate an individualized intervention package for each participant. Every participant got a contingency contract with a visual schedule connected to a token system. In addition, parents got a list of how to respond to each school refusal behavior emitted by their child in the mornings. Finally, one participant got a changed after-school routine and a list of tasks to help him communicate to peers. School refusal behavior for all participants decreased after the intervention package was introduced. Parents and their children answered a social validity questionnaire after the study and reported that the intervention was easy to implement, fun for the children and resulted in a better morning routine and that the children felt better after receiving the intervention.

 
128. Function-Based Interventions for Students With Emotional Behavior Disorders: A Systematic Review
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
RITA MARIE DRUFFNER (Mississippi State University), MacKenzie D Sidwell (Mississippi State University), Justin P. Allen (Sam Houston State University), Landon Bonner (Mississippi State University ), Marilyn Kolpien (Mississippi State University), Whitney Davis (Sam Houston State University), Michelle Poynter (Mississippi State University), Jacie Rinehart (Mississippi State University )
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract:

A cornerstone of behavior analysis the assessment and treatment through function-based approach. These principles can be applied to a wide-range of challenging behaviors. However, there appears to be limited research analyzing the use of functional assessments and function-based treatments for students with emotional disorders. Students with emotional behavior disorders are at a higher risk for poor academic outcomes, poor social outcomes, and contacting the school-to-prison pipeline. The current study seeks to identify and synthesize empirically supported literature pertaining to function-based interventions for students with or at-risk for an emotional or behavior disorders across educational environments. This research seeks to identify current practices in the area of functional assessment and function-based interventions for this population to be used by researchers and clinicians to make improvements in these areas of weakness.

 
129. Static Arrays Produce Better Outcomes With Adults During Matching Task: Implications for Children With Autism
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CRAIG A MARRER (Endicott College), Mark R. Dixon (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Discussant: Sunny Kim (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Abstract:

Eighty adults (M age = 32.6, SD = 8.28) completed 100 delayed match-to-sample trials via a web-based program. Participants were required to match 10 multi-colored visual stimuli generated by the DALL•E AI software package to 10 CVC words. Participants were randomly assigned to either a static array or dynamic array condition. Error correction during static array trials presented stimuli using the same comparison array arrangement seen during the initial trial, while error correction during dynamic array trials presented the comparison array arrangement in a randomized order. A one-tailed t-test was conducted with results showing that participants in the static array condition emitted fewer errors during initial trial presentations (M = 48.15, SD = 24.43) compared to participants in the dynamic array condition (M = 71.35, SD = 46.73), t(58) = 2.0, p < .05. Participation time was also significant with participants in the static array group spending an average of 22.11 min (SD = 4.531) to complete all trials compared to 30.35 min (SD = 17.03) required by participants in the dynamic array group, t(58) = 2.1, p < .05. These results suggest that array manipulation during error correction trials may influence program efficiency.

 
130. "Does It Even Make a Difference?" A Look at Staff Treatment Fidelity After Behavior Skills Training in Schools
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
ALEXA NAKVOSAS (Trinity Christian College)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract:

Behavior Skills Training is a widely researched and highly effective training program. However, it is timely and oftentimes irrelevant in school improvement training sessions (Reid et. al, 2019). This research looks at the efficacy of behavior skills training on paraprofessional treatment fidelity when done in smaller, more accessible chunks for educators. It also simultaneously measures student behavior progress related to staff fidelity.

 
131. A Case Study of the Implementation of a Multi-tiered Approach to Address Bullying Behavior in a Public-School Setting: Project Prevent and Address Bullying Behavior at All Tiers (PPABB)
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
REGINA KOONS (Wauconda Community Unit School District ), Jesse (Woody) W. Johnson (Northern Illinois University), Michelle Demaray (Northern Illinois University), Julia Ogg (Northern Illinois University), Christine Malecki (Northern Illinois University)
Discussant: Sunny Kim (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Abstract:

Northern Illinois University’s Project Prevent and Address Bullying Behavior at All Tiers (PPABB) is a collaboration between the Specialist in School Psychology Program and the Special Education M.S.Ed. Specialization in Behavior Analysis Program at NIU. The project provides specialized cross-disciplinary training to prevent and address bullying behavior in schools. Scholars from both school psychology and special education receive specialized training and shared coursework. A coordinated interdisciplinary practicum occurs during the final semester of training. Graduates of the project will be licensed school psychologists and BCBA special educators with expertise in applied behavior analysis and specialized interdisciplinary training in addressing bullying across all tiers of support. This poster describes the implementation of a multi-tiered approach to addressing bullying behavior in a public-school setting. Practical strategies are described to assist school-based practitioners with 1) implementing universal practices to prevent bullying, 2) developing and implementing effective behavior analytic bullying interventions at the class wide and specific setting level, 3) using data to determine youth who may need more targeted supports, 4) conducting functional behavioral assessments of bullying behavior to develop and implement individualized function-based interventions for students with more intensive needs.Finally, the first author will describe obstacles and barriers to effective implementation, as well as strategies for overcoming common barriers.

 
132. Assessing the Acceptability and Feasibility of Technology to Support School-Based Teleconsultation
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
SHANNON MARIE DIERINGER (Ball State University), Margaret Floress (Eastern Illinois University), Kimberly Zoder-Martell (Ball State University)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract:

In recent years, research related to the acceptability, feasibility, efficiency, and effectiveness of school based-teleconsultation has emerged in the literature. Although data are encouraging in that teleconsultation may be a viable alternative or adjunct to traditional consultation, concerns exist. Specifically, concerns related to connectivity issues, cost, feasibility, acceptability, and efficiency exist. The purpose of the current study was to explore the use of different technology that can be used to facilitate school-based teleconsultation. We evaluated the feasibility, efficiency, and acceptability of different types of technology that can be used to facilitate school-based consultation. Pre-service clinicians used three different types of technology (web cameras, Swivls, and telepresence robots) during mock consultation sessions and rated each technology on a variety of factors. Participants expressed a slight preference for the Swivl, shown in their overall scores from the follow-up surveys despite issues with audio connectivity. The strengths and limitations for each technology will be reported as well as guidelines for utilizing each in teleconsultation.

 
133. Experiences of Behavior Analysts With the Education System
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
ZOE BROADUS (Northern Michigan University), Ashley Shayter (Autism Alliance of Michigan), Jacob H. Daar (Northern Michigan University)
Discussant: Sunny Kim (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Abstract:

ABA-Based therapies are considered among the most effective and evidenced-based strategies for supporting individuals with autism across of number of clinical and educational domains. Despite these successes, the public education system has been slow to adapt ABA strategies or to allow for the ABA services as “related services” within the Individualized Education Support Plans of those with Autism eligibilities. The purpose of the current study was to explore the experiences and perspectives of behavior analytic professionals who supported individuals attending public schools. Participants responded to an online survey containing questions regarding their current practice, the types of clients they serve, successes and difficulties in providing services within the school system, and in the types of training that participants received to prepare them for school-based services. Of 277 participants who responded to the survey, the behavior analytic professionals overwhelmingly indicated frequent difficulties in providing services in the schools, including lack of buy in from school professionals, administrative obstacles, lack of funding mechanisms, and lack of follow through with respect to behavior change procedures. Additionally, most participants reported limited pre-service training in school-based implementation. These data suggest several areas for improvement in the relationship between behavior analysts and special education programs, training of consultant skills for behavior analysts, and priorities for policy advocacy.

 
134. Measurement of Challenging Behavior in School Settings
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
JENNIFER LEDFORD (Vanderbilt University)
Discussant: Eric Anderson
Abstract: Direct measurement of behavior is common in single case research, and has many advantages, including sensitivity to behavior change and individualization to client needs. Estimation of behavioral occurrence using interval-based systems is frequently used, especially in studies evaluating interventions for challenging behavior. In this systematic review, we describe operationalization and measurement of challenging behavior in school-based settings and discuss challenges with estimating behaviors when we are interested in multiple dimensions of occurrence (e.g., frequency, duration).
 
 

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