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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Event Details

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Symposium #321
CE Offered: BACB
The CABAS Accelerated Independent Learn Model: The Application of a Science of Teaching in Inclusive Classrooms
Monday, May 30, 2016
4:00 PM–5:50 PM
Regency Ballroom B, Hyatt Regency, Gold West
Area: EDC/VRB
CE Instructor: JoAnn Pereira Delgado, Ph.D.
Chair: JoAnn Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Discussant: Grant Gautreaux (Nicholls State University)
Abstract: In this symposium we will present an overview the procedures utilized in the Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) Model of Instruction. The AIL model is based on the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to School (CABAS) model and utilizes scientific procedures for classroom management, curricular design and pedagogy. We currently have general education classrooms for students with and without disabilities from preschool through 5th grade. We also have classrooms composed of students with disabilities, ranging from lower elementary through middle school that function to prepare students for inclusion into our other classrooms. A thorough curriculum based measurement is used and individualized progress is measured and displayed on learning pictures, which is a visual display of student learning across subject areas. A critical component of the AIL model is that students move at their own pace and are taught to mastery. In some cases, teachers may induce critical verbal behavior developmental cusps or capabilities so that they may learn in ways they could not prior to interventions and can then successfully access the general education curriculum. Our goal is to accelerate learning for all learners by utilizing a functional curriculum that teaches students to enjoy learning.
Keyword(s): AIL, CABAS, Inclusion, Observational Learning
Teaching Academics in a General Education Inclusion Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten Accelerated Independent Learner Classroom
EMMY NERLANDY MAURILUS (Teachers College Columbia University ), Michelle Mackey (Morris School District), JoAnn Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: We will present an overview of the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis (CABAS®) Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) model classrooms in the early grade levels. Teachers apply the principles and tactics derived from the science of behavior to general education inclusion classrooms to build foundational knowledge and skills. In the early grades, teachers emphasize teaching self-management and are strategic scientists who are able to use the learn unit, AIL decision protocol tactics and verbal behavior protocols to teach all students. Teachers in the CABAS® classroom make moment-to-moment decisions about a student’s learning while they are teaching. This ensures that the students in CABAS®classrooms continue to learn and excel at their own pace. When a student is not learning, the teacher uses verbal behavior protocols that enable students to learn in ways that they could not before. Teacher use of protocols, data analysis, and the application of tactics derived from science of behavior results in data that has demonstrated the efficacy of the CABAS® model in teaching many students in these classrooms to remain at or above grade level across all academic subjects.
Maximizing Instruction: Teaching Academics to First and Second Grade Students in Accelerated Independent Learner Classrooms
KELLY L KLEINERT (Morris School District), Jennifer Lee (Teachers College, Columbia University), Laura Darcy (Teachers College, Columbia University), JoAnn Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: In Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS) Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) inclusion classrooms, tactics and principles of behavior analytic literature were implemented to maximize the acquisition of academic repertoires for first and second grade students. Class-wide and individual self-management tactics were selected to target independent learning repertoires across all students. Some self-management tactics applied included class-wide systems of reinforcement (i.e., token economy), checklists, public postings, and class-wide contingencies. Learning tactics were applied to increase the amount of instruction contacted across all students, for example: (a) peer tutoring, (b) personalized system of instruction (PSI), and (c) acquisition of verbal behavior developmental cusps and capabilities. Data were collected on the students’ rate of acquisition (i.e., number of learn units to objective) and cumulative numbers of objectives met. The data suggest that principles and tactics of behavior analysis applied in general education classroom settings increased the academic gains made by first and second grade students. A general overview of the principles and tactics of behavior analysis applied to target acquisition of academic repertoires will be presented and discussed to foster further applications in the general education setting.
The Application of the Accelerated Independent Learner Model in Upper Elementary Classrooms
KELLY MERCORELLA (Teachers College Columbia University), Jennifer Weber (Teachers College, Columbia University), Colleen Cumiskey (Teachers College, Columbia University), JoAnn Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: The Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) Model of instruction is a researched based program that focuses on the needs of the individual student. The goal of the AIL model is to create independent learners driven by the need to know and a love of learning through the use of tactics based on the principles of behavior. In order to allow students to make greater academic gains, the Accelerated Independent Learner model focuses on teaching students the foundational skills needed for higher-level problem solving to mastery and fluency, as well as incorporating functional writing into all aspects of instruction. All responses are rotated between written and vocal responses using tactics such as choral responding, response boards and independent practice. Each student’s responses to instruction are recorded, graphed, and individually analyzed using learning pictures, in order to maximize academic gains through the implementation of tactics to increase learning outcomes. This paper aims to explain the tactics implemented to increase learning outcomes and help struggling learners, display school-wide data across 3-5 AIL classrooms, and highlight the importance of teaching skills to fluency and mastery.
The Application of Accelerated Independent Learner Model to Middle School Students in a Self-Contained Classroom
CAROLINE MARY LOUISE CROSBIE (Columbia University, Teachers College), JoAnn Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: The Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS) Accelerated Independent Model is a scientific method for teaching which is applicable to students with disabilities and typically developing students. This paper will focus on a new middle school program for students with disabilities. The students in this self-contained classroom are 6-8th graders who receive inclusion opportunities in resource rooms and general education classrooms based on individual needs. Research-based behavior supports and tactics are used with the students in every setting. Protocols based in the Verbal Developmental Theory are conducted in the self-contained classrooms in addition to self-management, and modified academic programs in order to prepare students for inclusion to be independent learners in a less restrictive environment. Data will be presented on students social interactions and academic programs.
 

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