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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Workshop Details

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Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designing Classroom Environments to Produce Generative Behavior
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, Ph.D.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), VICCI TUCCI (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.)
Description: Educators cannot possibly teach everything that needs to be learned with explicit instruction and practice to fluency. Effective, independent adults must learn how to learn without teachers and instruction. They must demonstrate generativity, the emergence of complex behavioral repertoires without explicit instruction. Many studies have been published demonstrating the process of generativity (e.g., Johnson & Layng, 1992; Andronis, 1999; Layng, Twyman & Stikeleather, 2004; Epstein, 1999). People must engage in behaviors they've learned in instruction in a wider variety of contexts than the classroom. We call this kind of generativity, application. They also engage in novel, untaught blends and re-combinations of behavior that they learned in school, in the context of new stimuli not encountered in classrooms. We call this kind of generativity, adduction, or contingency adduction. In this workshop participants will examine two instructional models that promote generativity, the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction (MMGI) for typical and near-typical learners (e.g., Johnson & Street, 2004, 2012, 2013), and the Competent Learner Model (CLM) for learners with autism and developmental disabilities (e.g., Tucci & Hursh, 1991; Tucci, Hursh & Laitinen, 2004). Participants will also design MMGI and CLM-based classroom environments to produce application and contingency adduction.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) break down a selected curriculum into its key tool skills, component skills, and composite repertoires; (2) design a generative application environment for one or more instructional objectives that they currently teach, using either MMGI or CLM procedures, including key motivational operations; (3) design a generative environment that is likely to produce contingency adduction of one or more instructional objectives that they currently teach, using either MMGI or CLM procedures, including key motivational operations.
Activities: Workshop presenters will teach each objective through lecture, study guides, and discussion. Participants will work in pairs or trios to analyze a selected curriculum area into its key tool skills, component skills and composite skills. Participants who work with children with autism will work in pairs or trios to design a CLM non-directed classroom environment to produce generative application of selected instructional objectives. Participants who work with typical or near-typical learners will work in pairs or trios to design an MMGI application classroom environment for selected instructional objectives. Each participant will be able to compare and contrast MMGI and CLM procedures employed to guarantee application. Participants who work with children with autism will work in pairs or trios to design a CLM non-directed classroom environment to produce generative contingency adduction of selected instructional objectives. Participants who work with typical or near-typical learners will work in pairs or trios to design an MMGI classroom environment to produce generative contingency adduction of selected instructional objectives. Each participant will be able to compare and contrast MMGI and CLM procedures employed to guarantee contingency adduction.
Audience: Those who deliver instructional services to typically developing children and youth, near-typical children such as those with ADHD and learning disabilities, and children with autism and developmental disabilities. This includes BCBAs, teachers, professionals of all types, and anyone interested in teaching higher-level skills.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate

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