Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

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Poster Session #256
CSS Sunday Poster Session
Sunday, May 30, 2021
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Online
47.

Cooperation in Groups: Effects of a Values-Based Task

Area: CSS; Domain: Basic Research
SADIE LYNN KLASSEN (University of Nevada, Reno), Natalie Buddiga (University of Nevada, Reno), Matt Locey (University of Nevada, Reno)
Discussant: Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract:

In behavior analysis, public goods games have been used to experimentally analyze cooperative behavior. Despite a growing number of studies using this and similar preparations, research is yet to evaluate how participants contribute other resources besides money. Furthermore, while research in values-based interventions have shown a contingent increase in prosocial behavior among participants, no study has yet examined this effect in an experimental preparation. The aim of the present study was twofold: (1) Assess how participants would allocate time—specifically towards pollution reducing activities—compared to money and (2) evaluate the effects of a values-based intervention on cooperation. During the public goods rounds, participants were instructed to allocate their given money or minutes to a collective fund in the standard task or for pollution reducing activities in the modified task. Values-based interventions asked the participant to evaluate and develop goals aligned with certain values concerning general social or environmental factors. Thus far, results have demonstrated more inconsistency in contributions prior to intervention and stability in responding post-intervention across both values-based tasks and the control task. This calls into question whether a values-based intervention can effectively alter cooperative behavior in an experimental task. More investigations, however, are warranted to isolate the necessary and sufficient variables for cooperation.

 
Sustainability submission 48. COVID-19: The Past, Present, and Future
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
TAYLOR ANNALISE JANOTA (Missouri State University), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Dana Paliliunas (Missouri State University), Elana Keissa Sickman (Missouri State University)
Discussant: Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract: COVID-19 is considered the most impactful global viral infection in the last century, resulting in a declaration by the World Health Organization (WHO) that the virus had met pandemic levels in March, 2020. In the first study, college student participants were given a probability discounting task that presented concurrent choices of social distancing for an amount of time or risk a global pandemic at a given probability ranging from 2.5 to 50 percent. In one condition, the participants selected options individually and in the other condition their choices were assumed to account for the group. Following the closure of the university and the pandemic announcement by the WHO, the same discounting tasks were re-administered. Results suggested that participants were more willing to socially distance for a longer duration if the choice was collective rather than individualistic and willingness was greater during the second administration within the pandemic. The second study extended upon the first study by incorporating delay discounting of past, present, and future, where participants were required to make probabilistic choices today, 4-months ago (i.e., on-set of the pandemic), and 4-months in the future (i.e., unknown state of the pandemic). Results are discussed in terms of policies related to collective action with implications for future pandemic events and similar global catastrophes.
 
50. Using Behavioral Skills Training to Teach Sexual Assault Reporting Steps to University Students
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
ASHA FULLER (University of South Florida; Arizona State University), Donald M. Stenhoff (Arizona State University)
Discussant: Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract: Among college students, sexual assault underreporting occurs significantly more than among other populations (NSVRC, 2018a). Two main types of training attempt to address the prevalence and underreporting of sexual assault: bystander education and victim advocate training. However, neither of these methods have been empirically validated. The purpose of this study was to compare behavioral skills training to the traditional information-only approach when teaching college student victim advocates the steps to reporting a sexual assault. Results from this study indicate that individuals in the behavioral skills training group demonstrated a greater understanding of the training content and retention of this information as compared to the information-only group. Future research should evaluate how these procedures extend to different populations and how long victim advocates can retain information on the steps to reporting.
 
51.

Self-Care Strategies and Job-Crafting Practices as Predictors of Work-Life Balance, Work Engagement, and Burnout

Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
JULIE M. SLOWIAK (University of Minnesota Duluth; InJewel LLC), Amanda DeLongchamp (University of Minnesota Duluth)
Discussant: Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) practitioners report high levels of burnout, exhibited as exhaustion and disengagement. Turnover, a stressful and costly experience for individual practitioners and the human service organizations that employ them, is a potential consequence of burnout. Work-life balance and work engagement are associated with lower burnout and lower intention to quit. Research concerning behavioral predictors of work-life balance, work engagement, and burnout—all of which are associated with turnover intentions—among ABA service providers is scant. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to explore whether and how the use of self-care strategies and job crafting practices influence perceived levels of work-life balance, work engagement, and burnout among ABA practitioners who work in human service settings. In a sample of 826 ABA practitioners, 72% reported medium to high levels of burnout. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that the use of both self-care strategies and job crafting practices strongly predicted work-life balance, work engagement, and burnout above and beyond sociodemographic variables (gender and years of experience). Findings can inform the development of effective organizational/systems- and individual-level self-care and job crafting interventions that support sustainable individual, organizational, and client-related outcomes. We contend that self-care and job crafting interventions support a culture of wellbeing in graduate programs, training/supervision curricula, and mentor/mentee relationships.

 
52. A Behavior Analytic Approach to Promote Fact-Checking on Social Media
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
CAROL E WILLIAMS (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract: Since at least 2017, Americans have turned to online sources for news and related information. Information propagated as false news has political, social, economic, and health implications which have potential collateral consequences of altering resource allocations, changing the status quo, and polarizing populations against one another based on interpretations of virally produced false information or identification with certain groups disseminating false narratives. To stem the flow of false information, online platforms such as Twitter, could utilize bilateral strategies, including analysis of response effort and individual behavior consequences. This quasi-behavioral experiment examined variables related to the flexibility of rule-governed behavior specific to sharing information using a single subject reversal design. The research determined a relation between the availability of convenient fact-checking services and the rates of sharing behavior. Additionally, the study examined factors relative to implementation of a consequence, wherein participant’s shared information was rated according to percentage of factually checked information and resulting in a publicized percentage on each participant’s public profile. The study results were that participants increased sharing of factual information with fact checking resources conveniently available; that sharing of false information was reduced with the introduction of a consequence; and that participants overall made use of a fact checking resource when it was conveniently available. Knowledge regarding what factors motivate readers to determine the validity of shared information and what may deter the spread of false news may provide strategies to improve social outcomes and reduce the negative impact of false information.
 
Sustainability submission 53. The Environmentalist Behavior Analyst: Identifying Opportunities and Feasibility of Behavior Analytic Careers in Sustainability
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
JESSICA GHAI (Boston University), Julia H. Fiebig (Ball State University; Applied Global Initiatives LLC), Holly Seniuk (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Discussant: Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract: While a vast majority of behavior analysts work within the fields of education and human services with individuals with autism and intellectual disabilities, a growing number of practitioners and researchers have expressed the desire to expand, or fully transition, beyond these traditional outlets to other emerging sectors of opportunities. Environmental sustainability is one area that continues to grow as a legitimate professional opportunity for behavior analysts. Given the complexity and urgency of this Super Wicked Problem, there exists a vast number of issues related to the environmental crisis that behavior analysts can apply their unique skill sets to achieve meaningful impact. This poster presents the vast array of environmental sustainability issues behavior analysis can help solve as well as a systematic framework for those behavior analysts thinking of focusing their behavior analytic work on sustainability. A comprehensive task analysis that encompasses procedures to clarify personal values, evaluate situational needs and assets, and the creation of an action plan are outlined. By undertaking this cyclical and interrelated individualized evaluation process, behavior analysts can start to think about how they may augment, or fully focus, their work in behavior analysis to critical issues of environmental sustainability.
 
Diversity submission 54. A Systematic Literature Review of Cultural Competency Training: Implications for Behavior Analysts
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
ALYSSA MICHELLE UHER (Michigan State University), Marisa H Fisher (Michigan State University)
Discussant: Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract: The new Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts goes into effect on January 1, 2022, including the updated Standard 1.07: Cultural Responsiveness and Diversity. To bring attention and change to the current absence of cultural competence and prioritization of culturally responsive practices, this addition places the responsibility to gain said competence on each practitioner. As content and materials to gain this competency will be a high priority, the field will need to create trainings and other resources to ensure all practitioners are culturally competent. Aligning with behavioral practices, behavior analysts will need to look to other fields to identify practices demonstrated to be effective in teaching cultural responsiveness. To assist the research, creation, and development of these trainings and content, the purpose of this project was to identify how other education-based professions teach cultural competence. A systematic review was conducted to identify cultural competency trainings for practitioners in fields that work with students with disabilities within the public school setting. The focus was to identify how cultural competency is defined by different fields, the methods used to teach cultural competency, the skills that were most often targeted, and to what extent performance was assessed before, during, and after training.
 
Sustainability submission 55.

Community Data Collection Initiative: Box Turtles

Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
Marwa Abdelkader (Florida State University, Panama City), LEAH JULIA KOEHLER (Florida State University, Panama City), Adam Kaeser (Bay County Box Turtle Project)
Discussant: Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract:

Currently, there is minimal research to engage members of the community to be involved in data collection. Traditional research standards encourage investigation of questions in which all variables can be controlled or influenced by investigators. By not conforming to these research values, broader contextual variables and new research questions can be studied at a community level (Fawcett, 1991). This study is a community-level initiative to engage members of three local neighborhoods to be involved in data collection on neighborhood box turtle sightings to aid local wildlife biologists in gaining information on species prevalence and conservation. We plan to examine the effectiveness of brochures, magnets, and social media platforms by systematically staggering these interventions across neighborhoods utilizing a multi-baseline design. Baseline data show an increase in data collection in one neighborhood without the introduction of a formal intervention and steady levels of data collection in the other neighborhoods. The first phase, a brochure delivered to all addresses in the first neighborhood, will be initiated this spring (March/April). Sustained data collection by community members will aid in a larger demographic data collection initiative on the local box turtle population.

 
56.

Ethical Dilemmas by Military Impacted ABA Practitioners

Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
BETHANY A PATTERSON (Helianthus Positive Behavior Services), Tiffany Michels (Helianthus Positive Behavior Supports), Kristen Grilli (23464)
Discussant: Mychal Machado (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Abstract:

The military lifestyle is a difficult, unique, and selfless lifestyle, yet poses many difficulties. One of these difficulties is the many ethical dilemmas to Applied Behavior Analysis practitioners. Within the military life, military and their families are to move every few years. Military lifestyle sends practitioners to remote areas with very few people on and surrounding the military base area. In some case the Applied Behavior Analysis practitioner is the only practitioner within miles, while in other cases they may be overseas with limited supports. Military may send practitioners to areas that have limited resources and cannot support adequate supervision. Remote supervision has been a huge help for many practitioners that are impacted by the military lifestyle and those that live in rural locations. Often times, the military will also send practitioners to areas that are very sparsely populated, with no other practitioner to provide Applied Behavior Analysis services from. There are many ethical dilemmas that can cause concern to Applied Behavior Analysis practitioners such as multiple relationships, exploitative relationships, working with limited resources, limited intervention staff, navigating cultural differences, and becoming burnt out. Further research is needed on the ethical dilemmas and limited supports of Military impacted Applied Behavior Analysis practitioners.

 
 

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