Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Event Details


Previous Page

 

Poster Session #89
EDC Saturday Poster Session
Saturday, May 29, 2021
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Online
25.

Adapting a Function-Based Intervention to Promote Autonomy and Safety for a Student With Emotional Disturbance

Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
MARNEY SQUIRES POLLACK (Vanderbilt University), Blair Lloyd (Vanderbilt University), Jessica Torelli (Western Kentucky University), Katie Copeland (Vanderbilt University)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

The latency-based functional analysis (FA) is a hypothesis testing strategy used to inform effective function-based interventions for students who engage in challenging behavior (Lambert et al., 2017). Despite the promise of interventions informed by this experimental analysis, some students—especially those with emotional/behavioral disorders—respond in unexpected ways. For example, the establishing operations presented during functional communication training may elicit challenging behaviors as part of a stress response or evoke them in the form of countercontrol. These unanticipated responses may signal intervention procedures are aversive to the student, indicating a need to adapt procedures to prioritize student autonomy and safety. One such modification is the Enhanced Choice Model (ECM; Rajaraman et al., 2018), where concurrently available alternatives to participating in intervention sessions are programmed. We implemented a latency-based FA and subsequent function-based intervention with an elementary student who received special education services under an emotional disturbance label. When initial functional communication training with isolated contingencies failed to reduce rates of challenging behavior, we implemented skill-based treatment (Hanley et al., 2014) within an ECM. Outcomes suggest, with a moderate degree of confidence, that the adapted intervention successfully increased the student’s tolerance for stressful classroom conditions.

 
26.

The Effects a Fluency Building Intervention on Math Facts Performance for Students Receiving Intensive Academic Support

Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
JAMES STOCKER (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Emily Crumpler (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

A growing body of evidence indicates systematic practice with math fact families efficiently and effectively improves fluency. The present investigation tested the effects of a fluency building intervention on math facts performance with four elementary school students participating in multi-tiered systems of support. The researchers employed a multiple baseline design across three sets of fact families. Intervention components consisted of modeling the fact family followed by three, one-minute practice trials with immediate feedback delivered between each timing. The students received up to a ten-day window of intervention on one set of fact families before moving to the next set. Results suggest a significant increase in digits correct per minute and a decrease in digits incorrect per minute. Study outcomes also suggest that fluency instruction focusing on the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction operations can plausibly serve as a viable alternative to instruction with isolated and unrelated math facts. Discussion points on stimulus equivalence as well as implications for practitioners and recommendations for future research will be shared.

 
28.

Effects of Point of View Video Modeling for Students With Autism: A Literature Review

Area: EDC; Domain: Theory
JARED R MORRIS (Brigham Young University), Ryan Kellems (Brigham Young University), Cade T. Charlton (Brigham Young University), Emmy Davis (Brigham Young University), Jamie McKay (Brigham Young University), Sarah McFadyen (Brigham Young University)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

This literature review was conducted to synthesize the research studies that evaluated point of view video modeling and analyze the behavioral, academic, and social outcomes it had on students with autism. Video modeling has been established through research as a robust intervention with positive effects across disabilities to teach behavioral, academic, functional, social, and life skills. Methods: A literature search was conducted using the online databases ERIC and APA PsychInfo. The Boolean search string: video technology AND modeling AND point of view AND autism was used. The titles and abstracts of the articles were reviewed to identify relevance and, in order to be included in the review, studies had to meet the following criteria: (a) independent variable is POV video modeling, (b) study participants are individuals with autism, and (c) study was conducted using a single-subject research design. Results: Twenty studies met the criteria for this review. Analysis of these studies indicate a functional relation between POV video modeling and the skills and behaviors the researchers were targeting. Implications: This systematic review provides evidence that point-of-view video modeling has positive effects when used to teach play, social skills, vocational tasks, letter writing, mathematics, and transition related tasks.

 
29.

Efficiency Analysis of a CABAS®-Based Low Intensity Educational Package for Teenagers and Young Adults

Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CLAUDIA PUCHETTI (VitaLab Educational Center), Fabiola Casarini (Scuola delle Stelle), Gianluca Amato (VitaLab Educational Centre), Elena Vaccari (VitaLab Educational Centre)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

We tested the effects of implementing a CABAS® based educational model for 12 adolescents and young adults, aged 13 to 21, all enrolled in a learning and research centre in Italy. We collected monthly data on the total number of Learn Units, on the learning objectives achieved and on the number of Learn Units to Criterion by each participant. Data were discussed based on graphical analysis and suggested that CABAS® can be an effective tactic for the individualized education of our Participants. Also, the model appeared to successfully adapt to the Italian welfare system, and could provide Public Services leaders with easy-to-read data on the efficiency of evidence-based treatments for adolescents and young adults. Further research should compare different treatment intensity packages and add norm-based data. This pilot project was aimed to measure treatment effectiveness and efficiency using Learn Units, with the purpose of sharing the results with the Italian Health Department and stakeholders.

 
30.

The Convergence of Mastery Criteria and Instructional Format: A Systematic Review

Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
MARLA HERNANDEZ (University of Missouri- Columbia), Lorraine A Becerra (University of Missouri), Samantha Kraus (University of Missouri)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is a widely accepted science in which treatment for problem behavior reduction and skill acquisition interventions has been developed for learners diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Discrete Trial Training (DTT) is an effective teaching method within ABA that presents teaching targets in a rapid instructional format until a mastery criterion is met (Smith, 2001). Clinicians and researchers select instructional format and mastery criterion when designing the DTT protocol for their clients with ASD. Modifications in the instructional format present ratios of mastered teaching targets relative to targets in acquisition. Furthermore, the specified mastery criterion demonstrates when a skill is learned to sufficiency. The interaction of teaching format and mastery criteria options may impact the efficient acquisition and maintenance of the novel skills. The purpose of this review was to systematically categorize and evaluate instructional format and mastery criteria within a discrete trial teaching procedure for learners with developmental disabilities. The review included 15 studies organized into the following categories: Mass trial, interspersed trial, and distributed trial, as well as mastery criteria. Task interspersal (75% of those that compared instructional format) and an 80% mastery criterion correct across 3 days or sessions (80% of those that compared mastery criteria) were the most commonly identified. However, there was extreme variability across studies and future research is needed to allow clinicians to form a rationale for their treatment modification selections. Clinical implications and future directions for research are discussed.

 
Diversity submission 31.

Computer Literacy in College Students and Unemployed Adults With Heroin Addiction

Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
MOLLY PRIMERO DEMAYO (California State University, Stanislaus), Shrinidhi Subramaniam (California State University, Stanislaus)
Discussant: Kimberly Crosland (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

Today, gaining competitive employment often requires searching for jobs and completing applications online, which may be a barrier for older, chronically unemployed adults with heroin addiction. In contrast, college students in the job market are presumed to be skilled with computers. To compare these populations, we measured digital literacy using interactive, online assessments (https://digitalliteracyassessment.org). Participants were 31 adults with chronic unemployment and heroin addiction (Treatment) and 115 college students enrolled in introductory computer science courses as part of their general education program (Control). Treatment participants had low median scores in assessments of Microsoft Word (52% vs. Control=83%), Microsoft PowerPoint (37% vs. Control=73%), and information literacy (49% vs. Control=67%). Although Control participants had higher median scores than Treatment participants in all domains, scores were within 10 percentage points in Social Media (difference=2.8%), Computer Basics (difference=7%), and E-mail (difference=9.2%). Employment support in addiction treatment should target computer skills to address this potential barrier to employment.

 
32.

A Review of Literature: Implications and Effectiveness of Using Self-Monitoring Interventions in the Inclusive General Education Classroom

Area: EDC; Domain: Basic Research
JESSICA HUBBARD (University of Memphis), James Nicholson Meindl (The University of Memphis)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract:

Educational policies over the past two decades have prioritized integrating students with disabilities into the general education setting. With this shift, the demographics of the general education setting have become more diverse, requiring teachers to implement a variety of behavioral and academic interventions to support the varying needs of individual students. To support teachers and students, interventions that are effective, while still socially valid, must be identified. Self-monitoring interventions have widely been used to address behavioral and academic concerns across a variety of educational and clinical settings and across a variety of disabilities. However, limited studies have examined the use of self-monitoring in the inclusive setting. Previous research would suggest that general education classroom teachers would benefit from implementing self-monitoring based intervention packages. Additionally, interventions capable of intervening on a group of students at one time, thereby reducing effort and oversight on the part of the teacher, are more favorable and socially valid. The combined use of a student-directed intervention (such as self-monitoring) and a group-based intervention (such as a group contingency) could have a significant impact on the performance of target and non-target students within a general education classroom. This study analyzes previous use of self-monitoring interventions, the possible implications of these interventions on the general education classroom setting, and makes suggestions for future research.

 
33. The Effects of Increased Opportunities to Respond and Goal Setting on Student Engagement in the Classroom
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
SYDNEY MARIE HARMON (Western Michigan University), Nicole Hollins (Western Michigan University), Stephanie M. Peterson (Western Michigan University)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract: Opportunities to respond (OTRs) and active student responding (ASR) are two variables that increase effective learning outcomes and appropriate behaviors for students in the classroom setting (Kestner et al., 2019). Goal setting and in-vivo coaching have demonstrated improvement in the number of praise statements delivered by teachers, while also improving implementation of classroom management interventions (Kleinert et al., 2017). In this study, consultants used evidence-based interventions to train one teacher on direct instruction teaching methodologies during large group instructional time. Specifically, consultants modeled the implementation of high rates of OTRs, then coached one teacher to implement these interventions. After coaching, an attainable goal was developed for student engagement and OTRs (i.e., the goal for OTRs was 4 per minute and the goal for student engagement was 70% or higher), supplemented with a graphic display of feedback before and after each session. Using an A-B design to systemically evaluate treatment effects, the results of this study indicate that the intervention was effective for increasing active student engagement (A=41% to B= 70%), rates of OTRs (A=3.22 to B=4.30), and behavior specific praise (A=5% to B=31%). Concluding consultative services, the teacher reported these procedures as being appropriate and sustainable for long term implementation.
 
34.

The Effects of Brief Values and Committed Actions Exercises Upon BCBA Candidate Study Behaviors During an Online BCBA Examination Preparatory Course

Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
BRIAN KATZ (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract:

Brief Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) exercises focusing on values clarification and committed action were delivered to post-master’s participants qualified to sit for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst exam in a virtual setting during a 6-week test preparation class by RogueABA. The current study was an extension of Palilunas et al. (2018) who conducted a randomized controlled trial and delivered the same exercises to master’s levels students in a university setting. The current study differed in that a single-subject experimental design was utilized, along with differing dependent variables. Following exposure to ACT exercises, there was an increase in psychological flexibility as indicated by results by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire 2 (AAQ-2); however, there was no clear evidence of a functional relation between these ACT exercises and several overt dependent variables. It was noteworthy that Group One, who gained more psychological flexibility as measured in an AAQ-2 self-report, completed an increased percentage of asynchronous online modules immediately following exposure ACT exercises. This was evident in a withdrawal design. However, this effect was not replicated for Groups Two and Three. Furthermore, the current study serves as a proof of concept in which automated data collection methods can be utilized to measure socially significant public behaviors in addition to self-reports that are commonly used in contextual behavior science research.

 
35.

Special Education Teachers as Coach for Paraprofessionals’ Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices: A Systematic and Quality Review

Area: EDC; Domain: Theory
AMANDA M AUSTIN (Purdue University), Hannah Crosley (Purdue University), Charissa Donn Voorhis (Purdue University), Rose A. Mason (Purdue University), Alexandra Newson (University of Oregon)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract:

Special education programming in public schools relies heavily on the use of paraprofessionals to support instructional, behavioral, and social learning for students with disabilities (SWDs), however, paraprofessionals often lack formal training in the use of evidence-based practices (EBP). Traditional lecture-style methods of professional development for school-based staff are neither cost or time-efficient, nor effective at producing long-term changes in instructional behaviors employed by staff in the classroom. Research has demonstrated that paraprofessional-level practitioners can learn to use high levels of implementation fidelity of EBPs with SWDs when provided experiential training such as coaching. We conducted a systematic and quality review of literature on the use of coaching to train paraprofessionals to implement interventions for SWDs. We reviewed 174 full-text articles for inclusion and evaluated the methodological rigor of the research. Contextual variables, including trainer and participant characteristics, target skills, and implementation fidelity were synthesized to provide a summary of strengths and gaps in the evidence. Recommendations for practice and future research will be discussed.

 
Sustainability submission 36. Improvement of reading and comprehending skills of children using ABA procedures.
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
MEERA RAMANI (ABA India), Rajashree Balasubramanian (ABA India )
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract: Two approaches were used to teach reading to children under the Autism Spectrum Disorder A traditional method was applied to teach reading and comprehension versus reading was taught using an ABA method. Three students with a previous diagnosis of autism and enrolled in a Centre participated in this study. The 3 children under the study were taught reading .The multi-sample matching procedure for teaching the relations between pictures and printed words was employed. In this procedure, each student’s attempt was composed of 3 sample stimuli and three comparison stimuli. In the test, it was assessed the emergence of relations between printed words and pictures, and naming printed words and pictures. The results indicated that the treatments that included ABA techniques were more effective than treatments that did not include ABA for teaching reading.
 
37. Overcoming Challenges Imposed by Virtual Learning for High School Freshmen Year: Infrastructure, Habits, Behavioral Momentum and Principles
Area: EDC; Domain: Theory
EMILY COOK (Bishop McDevitt High School, Harrisburg, PA), Matthew Gross (Shippensburg University), Richard Cook (Applied Behavior Medicine Associates of Hershey)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract: Freshman year of high school Is historically fraught with challenges commensurate with the opportunities. These challenges mount in the setting in which the student is new to a school system, let alone in the midst of the overwhelming societal disruption of the Covid 19 pandemic, especially for the student using virtual online options in hybrid school settings. A student, however, can utilize principles and practices of Applied Behavior Analysis to mitigate some of the undesirable effects, and thereby ameliorate aspects of the situation. Some of the useful behavioral concepts which can be used by counselors and therapists, teachers, parents, and even the students themselves include developing behavioral momentum, the related use of successive approximations, token economies, the Premack principle, reinforcer and punisher determination, and the use of motivation establishing operations, among others. Domains of the life of the freshman new to the school system using "virtual learning" include the academics (homework, study habits, paying attention in class especially given the presence of household distractions, keeping track of assignments, taking tests, communicating via internet with teachers and classmates); social contacts within the school and making new friends; mastering technological challenges unique to online learning especially in a "hybrid" situation where most classmates are attending in person; and dealing with school system bureaucratic issues including teachers unfamiliarity and difficulties with the virtual technologies and administrators simply not familiar with or sensitive to the challenges faced by online students. In addition there are challenges historically common to all high school students including extra curricular activities in and out of school, social media, household and family dynamics, and the rest of life out of school. This presentation highlights - from the perspective of one such freshman- application of the behavioral concepts to those domains, including ways in which improvements made for the pandemic can be maintained and generalized afterwards.
 
38. Evaluating Self-Compassion and Mindfulness Training and Academic Wellbeing
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
JESSICA M VENEGONI (Missouri State University ), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Dana Paliliunas (Missouri State University), Camilla Molica (Missouri State University), Jessica Summers (Missouri State University)
Discussant: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
Abstract: College students all across America went from socializing on campus to social distancing in their dorms. As the number of COVID-19 cases rise, so can the number of mental health challenges that college students experience. The present studies examined the effectiveness of the implementation of a semester long self-compassion training program, which is embedded within undergraduate coursework and compared to students in a control group who receive and complete weekly study tips, and also correlations between academic performance and academic wellbeing using scales such as the AAQ-II, CompACT, and Self-Compassion Scale in undergraduate students. The three dimensions of self-compassion and mindfulness activities utilized in the study include mindfulness, common humanity and self-kindness. A Quasi-experimental study of self-compassion and mindfulness training in college classrooms is measured using a cross over design. Results support a relationship between self-compassion, flexibility, and academic wellbeing, and that a brief intervention can affect these processes in a college classroom.
 
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE