Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Event Details

Previous Page

 

Poster Session #298
Sunday, May 24, 2020
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Hall D
56.

Examining the Reliability of an Objective Severity Tool to Classify Severe Problem Behaviour

Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
MARIE-CHANEL MONIQUE MORGAN (Brock University), Alison Cox (Brock University)
Discussant: Dawn Allison Bailey (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

The term ‘severe’ is a commonly used descriptor for problem behavior in research and practice. We examined research trends across the behavior analytic literature over the last 20 years (Cox, Leung, Morgan, submitted) and noticed that when authors used the term ‘severe’, it was often based on ill-defined, arbitrary criteria (e.g., Borrero, Vollmer & Wright, 2002). When severity is classified, the tools used are primarily indirect (Rojahn, Aman, Matson & Mayville, 2003; Rojahn, Rowe, Sharber, Hastings, Matson, Didden, Kores & Dumont, 2012). The proposed thesis will investigate the reliability of a 'behaviourally-anchored' tool created to classify problem behaviour severity using quantifiable variables (i.e., instances of problem behaviour, convictions, etc.). Researchers will recruit 24 Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) separated into two groups; ‘experienced’ or ‘inexperienced’ writers. Participants will evaluate 30 case scenarios with and without access to the severity tool. Investigators will use intraclass correlation to explore interrater consistency within the groups. Researchers will also conduct a two-by-two mixed model ANOVA to explore the differential impact of the tool and clinician experience. The information collected from this research will help to establish a reliable and objective measure to classify problem behaviour to help practitioners and researchers implement applicable interventions.

 
57. Social Studying: The Use of Online Study Groups to Improve Student Scores on BCBA Exam Preparation Assessments
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
MARGARET PAVONE DANNEVIK (Lindenwood University), Liat Sacks (Study Notes ABA)
Discussant: Dawn Allison Bailey (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Abstract: The use of internet-based interventions for teaching behavior analytic concept has been shown to be a promising emerging technology for parents and technicians (Meadan & Daczewitz, 2015). However, the use of internet-based teaching interventions among college students has not been explored. This study used an internet-based package intervention to help adult students improve their performance on assessments of behavior analytic concepts. The internet-based package treatment included weekly testing, self-monitoring of study behavior duration, and participation in peer study groups held online as these treatments have been shown to positively affect academic performance when used on-ground (Griffin & Griffin, 1997; Mawhinney et al., 1971; Pigott, Fantuzzo, & Clement, 1986). A multiple baseline across participants design was used to assess the efficacy of the treatment package. Results indicate that for all participants, internet-based study groups, weekly testing, and self-monitoring improved scores on behavior analytic skill assessments.
 
58.

A Replication: Teaching the Implementation of the Picture Exchange Communication System Through Behavioural Skills Training

Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
AISLING COLLINS (Jigsaw CABAS School), Philippa Da Silva (Jigsaw CABAS school)
Discussant: Dawn Allison Bailey (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

The present study sought to teach teachers how to implement the first two phases of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) protocol, whilst also investigating the utility of Behavioural Skills Training (BST) as a training method in a systematic replication of a study by (Rosales, Stone, & Rehfeldt, 2009). Two teachers working in an specialist Applied Behaviour Analysis school took part, with the study taking a quasi-experimental AB design with confederate adult learners and physical prompters also partaking. After reading the PECS manual, baseline probe sessions were conducted with the percentage accuracy of steps completed in the role of the communicative partner serving as the dependent variable. BST was then conducted with both participants meeting the competency criterion after just one practice session. The post-probe sessions were conducted several weeks later. The results indicated that BST was an effective and efficient methodology to teach the skill, though effects were not fully maintained. Further research should test generalisation to true PECS users, analyse rates of acquisition for later PECS phases, seek to improve procedural fidelity and assess effects under a more stringent competency criterion.

 
59. Analysis of Program Mode, Cohort Size, and Certification Exam Pass Rates Across Verified Course Sequences in Behavior Analysis
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
KENDRA GUINNESS (Simmons University), Kylan S. Turner (Simmons University)
Discussant: Dawn Allison Bailey (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Abstract: The Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) annually publishes certification exam pass rates for all verified course sequences, as well as the program mode (online, campus, hybrid, or both) and cohort size (i.e., how many students from the course sequence sat for the exam that year). This information can inform course sequence selection for prospective graduate students in behavior analysis. The purpose of this analysis was to explore relations among program mode, cohort size, and pass rate for verified course sequences in behavior analysis based on reported results for 2018. Statistical analyses revealed that mean pass rates were significantly lower for online programs (M = 55%, range = 18%-89%) relative to campus (M = 76%, range = 30%-100%) and hybrid programs (M = 78%, range = 30%-100%). Further, cohort sizes were significantly larger for online programs (M = 103, range = 6-627) relative to campus (M = 14, range = 6-73) and hybrid programs (M = 19, range = 6-207), and a weak, negative correlation was found between pass rate and cohort size (r = -.201, p = .024). Possible variables responsible for these differences are discussed, including student selection of program mode and variability in course delivery across online programs.
 
60.

Embedding Single Case Design Research into a Master's Program in Special Education With an Applied Behavior Analysis Emphasis

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
SUZANNE JERI YOCKELSON (Brandman University)
Discussant: Dawn Allison Bailey (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Understanding how to interpret and use single case design research (SCDR) is a required skill for Applied Behavior Analysts. The fact that there is a dedicated domain in the task list for understanding, using, and interpreting SCDR speaks to the importance of that skill. Verified Course Sequences (VCS) that train future behavior analysts are tasked with teaching the value of SCDR research as it relates to building evidence based interventions as well as the knowledge and skills to interpret, use and implement the research. Even with didactic instruction, students struggle to understand the importance of rigor in research designs, internal validity, and how to differentiate data collection from research; specifically the importance of replication to demonstrate a functional relationship. This poster describes how one Master’s program overcame the challenge of students struggling with the concepts of SCDR and evidence based Interventions by having each student complete an individual SCDR study as part of a Master’s program in Special Education with an emphasis in Applied Behavior Analysis. The student research projects span 5 terms 8-week terms, and culminates in a capstone class during which the students finalize a five chapter research project (thesis). Students are assigned a faculty mentor who advises them from start to finish to ensure a cohesive, rigorous and valid research study. Data presented include frequency of topics selected by students over a 3 year period, methodologies used (e.g., reversal/withdrawal, multiple baseline). Additionally, final reflective statements by students about their learning will be included. Students report an increased understanding of the importance of using evidence based practices, increased confidence in reading and evaluating research and an increased sense of competence.

 
61.

Interteaching in Combination With Cumulative Exams

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CATHERINE M. GAYMAN (Troy University), Stephanie Jimenez (University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown), Sherwonda Taylor (Troy University ), Stephany Hammock (Troy University)
Discussant: Dawn Allison Bailey (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

The present study evaluated the effect of using cumulative versus noncumulative exams in two nine-week online asynchronous classes. Participants were undergraduate students enrolled in one of two sections of a psychology of learning course (N = 77). The study used a group design, in which one section of the course used cumulative weekly exams, whereas the second section of the course used weekly chapter exams. Results showed that cumulative final exam scores were significantly higher after students had been taking cumulative exams all term, which suggests that combining cumulative exams with interteaching improves long-term retention of information. Students in the noncumulative section of the course reported higher ratings when asked if they crammed for the final exam and they rated the overall quality of interteaching components lower. Overall, the present findings suggest that cumulative weekly exams can increase the effectiveness of interteaching.

 
62.

Preparing Educators to Support Augmentative and Alternative Communication Through Online Instruction of System of Least Prompts

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
ASHLEY MCCOY (Bowling Green State University), David McNaughton (Penn State University), Theoni Mantzoros (The Pennsylvania State University), Jessica Gormley (Munroe-Meyer Institute), Tara O'Neill (Misericordia University)
Discussant: Dawn Allison Bailey (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

System of least prompts (SLP) is an instructional strategy that has been used to teach augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). However, there is limited research focusing on how SLP is taught to educators. Twenty participants were recruited from an online assistive technology course. Participants included graduate and undergraduate students with majors including: secondary education, elementary and early childhood education, and rehabilitation and human services. This study utilized a pre/posttest group design with switching replications. Three dependent variables were measured: SLP (a) knowledge, (b) planning, and (c) teleconference implementation. Data were analyzed using a two-way mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA). Data were also collected on procedural fidelity, reliability, and social validity. Results indicate that online training was effective in increasing knowledge (F(2, 32)= 17.524, p < 0.001, η2p = 0.523) and planning (F(2, 36)= 24.186, p < 0.001, η2p = 0.573) performance. SLP implementation also increased over time (F(2, 36)= 12.253, p < 0.001, η2p = .405); however, this result was not directly related to the online training (i.e., the effect of time was not different for the two groups). Participants reported learning a valuable skill and were more confident working with individuals who use AAC.

 
63. Behavior Analytic Dissemination: Using the ECHO Model
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
RACHEL L. WHITE (University of Alaska Anchorage)
Discussant: Dawn Allison Bailey (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Significant disparities exist between those who have access to services and those who do not. Although the number of Behavior Analysts in Alaska has grown over the last decade, each Behavior Analyst would be responsible for over 10,000 square miles if divided equally. As a result, Behavior Analysts need to disseminate information to a broad range of individuals with varying levels of skills and abilities. One way to improve dissemination is through the ECHO® Model. Project ECHO® (Arora et al., 2007) is designed to “increase workforce capacity to provide best-practice specialty care and reduce health disparities.” The model uses video conferencing to create a virtual learning community that connects a team of interdisciplinary experts (i.e., hub) to professionals (i.e., spokes) to share best practices through didactics and case-based learning. The four pillars of ECHO are 1) short didactic trainings, 2) case-based learning, 3) ongoing case-management and 4) robust program evaluation. Since 2017, the Center for Human Development at the University of Alaska Anchorage has been disseminating Behavior Analytic information through several tele-ECHO series. Through retrospective pre-post evaluations, participants report increased knowledge and ability to work with more complex cases.
 
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE