Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Event Details

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Invited Paper Session #110
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
TRAUMA: Prevention of Traumatic Events: Use of Antecedent and Generalization Strategies
Saturday, May 23, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Chair: Kelly M. Schieltz (University of Iowa)
CE Instructor: Kelly M. Schieltz, Ph.D.
Presenting Authors: RON VAN HOUTEN (Western Michigan University), RAYMOND MILTENBERGER (University of South Florida)
Abstract: Pedestrian crashes have been on an increasing trend in recent years. Reasons possibly include increased levels of distracted driving, increased speeding behavior, and increased walking. Behavioral science has contributed to ways to increase driving yielding behavior on a community wide basis and the development on antecedent interventions that have been documented to increase reduce unsafe behavior and crashes. This presentation will focus on discussing some of the more important techniques as well as why antecedent interventions are effective without obvious sources of reinforcement.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the validity of different approaches to the assessment of safety skills; (2) describe behavioral skills training and its limitations for teaching safety skills; (3) describe in situ training for teaching safety skills; (4) describe strategies for promoting generalization of safety skills; (5) list several important variables used to change cultural safety practices; (6) discuss why interventions that rely on antecedents so effective, and how to further increase their efficacy; (7) discuss how the effect of behavioral safety methods on crashes is evaluated.
 
Reducing Pedestrian Injuries and Deaths
RON VAN HOUTEN (Western Michigan University)
Dr. Van Houten received his BA from SUNY at Stony Brook and his MA and Ph.D. from Dalhousie University, where he received training in the experimental analysis of behavior. He is currently professor of psychology at Western Michigan University. Dr. Van Houten has published extensively in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) on a wide variety of problems, such as the education of inner city youth and children with “learning disabilities,” the treatment of children and adults with developmental delays, the treatment of clinical problems in children, traffic safety, energy conservation, and aviation safety. Currently Dr. Van Houten is a member of the Transportation Research Board and a member of the National Committee for Uniform Traffic Control Devices. He is a past associate editor for JABA and a Fellow of ABAI. Dr. Van Houten is also an avid pilot of power aircraft and gliders and a flight instructor.
Abstract: This presentation will discuss research on teaching safety skills to children. It will describe different approaches to assessment of safety skills and the validity of these approaches. It will describe research on the effectiveness of interventions for teaching safety skills with an emphasis on active learning approaches including behavioral skills training and in situ training. The presentation will discuss the issue of generalization, the limits of behavioral skills training for promoting generalization, and strategies that can be used to enhance generalization. The presentation will discuss the issue of accessibility and strategies for increasing accessibility of effective interventions.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the validity of different approaches to the assessment of safety skills; (2) describe behavioral skills training and its limitations for teaching safety skills; (3) describe in situ training for teaching safety skills; (4) describe strategies for promoting generalization of safety skills; (5) list several important variables used to change cultural safety practices; (6) discuss why interventions that rely on antecedents so effective, and how to further increase their efficacy; (7) discuss how the effect of behavioral safety methods on crashes is evaluated.
 
Teaching Safety Skills: What Does It Take to Get Children to Do the Right Thing?
RAYMOND MILTENBERGER (University of South Florida)
Dr. Raymond G. Miltenberger received his Ph.D. from Western Michigan University and currently is professor of psychology and director of the Applied Behavior Analysis Master’s Program at the University of South Florida. He is the author of a highly regarded textbook on behavior modification, which is used at many universities across the country in both undergraduate and graduate courses. Dr. Miltenberger is most well known for having conducted a long-standing and
systematic series of studies on clinical (habit) disorders, prevention of abduction, and firearms safety. In particular, his research in the latter two areas has been characterized by the highly creative use of simulations and generalization testing, and by the careful development of task-analysis-based instruction described as “behavioral skills training.” In recognition of this work, he has received the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Applied Research from the
American Psychological Association (Division 25), and he has served as president of ABAI. 
 

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