Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Event Details

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Symposium #449
CE Offered: BACB
Efficacy Demonstrations for Training Caregivers, Professionals, and Students to Collect and Graph Data, Assess, and Treat Problem Behavior
Monday, May 25, 2020
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Archives
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Robert K. Lehardy (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Discussant: Florence D. DiGennaro Reed (University of Kansas)
CE Instructor: Florence D. DiGennaro Reed, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Efficacious training procedures are critical for teaching new skills to caregivers, behavioral and non-behavioral professionals, and students. Each paper in this symposium uses applied research to evaluate and demonstrate the training of different skills to establish effective training procedures. Andersen, Haney, Hansen, and Peterson evaluated systematic fading and immediate verbal prompts to teach new staff to collect data on multiple behaviors simultaneously using an electronic data collection system. Ibañez, Peters, Bacotti, Lloveras, and Vollmer evaluated the effects of a training package consisting of instructions, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback, to teach behavior analysts and occupational therapy providers to conduct a structured mealtime assessment. Lehardy, Luczynski, Hood, and McKeown made a video tutorial to teach Master’s students to create publication-quality multiple-baseline graphs using Microsoft Excel. Phillips, Fisher, and Hardee developed an e-learning computer module to train caregivers to implement functional communication training as an intervention for severe problem behavior. Dr. Florence DiGennaro Reed, an expert on training and performance management, will serve as the discussant for these papers.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Caregiver training, Staff training, Student training
Target Audience:

Master's and Doctoral students, behavioral and non-behavioral professionals.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify efficacious methods to train caregivers, professionals, or students; (2) use technology-enhanced procedures to collect data, graph data and treat problem behavior; and (3) apply these to engage in more effective practice.
 
An Evaluation of Observer Training Procedures to Promote Accurate Data Collection
ASHLEY ANDERSEN (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Sarah D Haney (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Bethany Hansen (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Kathryn M. Peterson (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract: Measurement of behavior is foundational in applied behavior analytic research and practice. However, little is known about efficacious ways of training observers to record relevant behaviors. Electronic data collection systems have many advantages such as efficiency of calculation and graphing, but they may become complex when observers must record multiple behaviors simultaneously. Research has shown that instructions and feedback can introduce bias. In addition, practice alone may be time-consuming and increase opportunities to practice errors. We used a multiple baseline design to evaluate the efficacy and efficiency of systematic fading and immediate verbal prompts to teach new staff to collect data on multiple behaviors simultaneously using an electronic data collection system. Preliminary results showed that fading alone was insufficient and inefficient to teach new staff to accurately collect data. Accurate data collection increased after adding errorless prompting to our fading procedure and occurred in fewer sessions. We discuss challenges with developing efficient and effective data-collection training procedures, implications for supervisors, and directions for future research.
 

Teaching Professionals to Conduct a Structured Mealtime Assessment

Vivian F Ibanez (University of Florida), KERRI P. PETERS (University of Florida), Janelle Kirstie Bacotti (University of Florida), Lindsay Lloveras (University of Florida ), Timothy R. Vollmer (University of Florida)
Abstract:

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often display feeding problems such as consumption of a limited variety of foods (Schreck, Williams, & Smith, 2004). It is also common for these children to be enrolled in early and intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) services for comprehensive treatment (Roane, Fisher, & Carr, 2016. Combined, these factors make it possible that behavior analysts will have a role in a child’s clinical care related to feeding. In addition, children with ASD are often attending regular appointments for occupational therapy (OT) and on occasion those providers are targeting feeding problems. However, given that the etiology of pediatric feeding disorders is complex and multifactorial (Peterson & Ibanez, 2018), OT providers and BCBAs should ensure they have sufficient training and a setting that is appropriate for assessment and treatment. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of a training package, including instructions, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback, for training BCBAs in an EIBI setting and OT providers to conduct a structured mealtime assessment. Training resulted in increases in their integrity of protocol implementation, and we observed replication of these effects for all participants.

 
Efficacy and Generality of a Video Tutorial to Create Publication-Quality, Single-Case Graphs in Microsoft Excel
ROBERT K. LEHARDY (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Kevin C. Luczynski (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Stephanie A. Hood (California State University, Northridge), Ciobha Anne McKeown (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract: Graphs permit behavior analysts to explore, analyze, summarize, and communicate data (Tufte, 2001), and creating single-case design graphs is a requisite skill for behavior analysts. We systematically replicated the graphs and the GraphPad Prism video tutorial by Mitteer, Greer, Fisher, and Cohrs (2018) using Microsoft Excel 2016 with 24 master’s students in a pretest-posttest design. Students’ mean accuracy on the multiple-baseline graph was 25% in pretraining, 86% with the video, and 96% after adding a remedial checklist. We then assessed the accuracy of students using the same video to create multielement and reversal graphs. Students’ means on the multielement graph was 93% with the video, and 94% after adding a remedial checklist. Students’ means on the reversal graph was 82% with the video, and 94% after adding a remedial checklist. Most students reported moderate to high satisfaction with the video and with the remedial checklist and recommended using the video with the checklist. The results support scientist-practitioners using the freely available video tutorial with the remedial checklist to create three common graphs using Microsoft Excel.
 
Efficacy of Module Based Functional Communication Caregiver Training for Moderate to Severe Problem Behavior
LAUREN PHILLIPS (The Behavior Center), Wayne W. Fisher (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Alexandra Hardee (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract: Intensive behavior-analytic services typically reduce problem behavior associated with autism spectrum disorder. Training caregivers to implement function-based interventions can address problem behavior and barriers to services (e.g., availability of behavior analysts to conduct the training). We developed an e-learning computer module to train caregivers to implement functional communication training, a function-based intervention. After caregivers conducted a functional analysis they completed a baseline assessment and responded as they typically would at home; we determined each caregiver’s percentage of correct responding. After completing the e-learning module, caregivers practiced implementing the training procedures in role-play scenarios. Lastly, caregivers completed a posttest with their child, and we evaluated improvements in their percentage of correct responding. All three caregivers demonstrated mastery of the procedures; one caregiver did not require feedback, two caregivers required feedback from a behavior analyst to meet mastery. We discuss these findings and their implications for teaching caregivers to implement behavior-analytic procedures.
 

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