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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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43rd Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2017

Event Details

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Symposium #114
CE Offered: BACB
Implementation of a School Wide Positive Behavior Support Program in Alternative Settings
Saturday, May 27, 2017
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Convention Center 406/407
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amy Fredrick, M.S.
Chair: Amy Fredrick (The Y.A.L.E. School)
Abstract: This symposium will include several papers presenting an overview of the first stages of implementation (Years 1-2) of a School Wide Positive Behavior Support program in a set of alternative, private educational settings that serve children and adolescents with emotional behavioral disorders, autism spectrum disorders, and other intellectual and developmental disabilities. The related papers will show data from before and after implementation of the program including data from incident reports, exclusionary time outs, disciplinary referrals, and treatment integrity. The presenters, clinicians overseeing the implementation, will discuss the history of the schools and previous school-wide interventions, obtaining buy in and support for the school-wide positive behavior support program, roll out, effectiveness, and implementation. Successes and challenges will be discussed in an effort to help others learn from the unique considerations of implementing this type of program in non-public school settings, an area currently lacking in the research literature. Special focus will be on the factors that may contribute to treatment integrity and modifications made throughout the initial implementation.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Implementation of a School Wide Positive Behavior Support Program in a Large Private School Serving Children and Young Adults With Autism and Other Intellectual Disabilities
EDWARD (CHRIS) C. VONDERSCHMIDT (Yale School), Kathy Tomon (Melmark), Elizabeth Burckley (The Vanguard School), Amy Fredrick (The Y.A.L.E. School), Amanda Guld Fisher (Temple University)
Abstract: This paper presentation will discuss the history, initiation, roll out, and effectiveness of a School Wide Positive Behavior Support program in a large, private school that serves children, adolescents, and adults with autism and other intellectual disabilities. The program transitioned from a previous school-wide program to a traditional School Wide Positive Behavior Support program. Data will be discussed on the effectiveness of the program across the first two years of implementation as well as treatment integrity data. Considerations will be discussed in terms of implementation treatment integrity, modifications, data monitoring, etc. The program was successful in decreasing behavioral incidents from the prior year; however, variables affected the demonstration of effectiveness such as increase in admissions, increase in severity of behavior disorders, support by staff, etc. Treatment integrity was regularly monitored and common errors will be reviewed with suggestions for modifications. The successes and challenges of the program will be discussed.
Effects of a School Wide Positive Behavior Support Program in a Small Private School Serving Children With Emotional Behavioral Disorders
AMY FREDRICK (The Y.A.L.E. School), Kathy Tomon (Melmark), Edward (Chris) C. Vonderschmidt (Yale School), Amanda Guld Fisher (Temple University Yale School)
Abstract: This paper presentation will discuss the initial roll out and continued implementation of a School Wide Positive Behavior Support program in a new and growing school for students with emotional behavioral disorders. The programs history of interventions, including common punitive and restrictive procedures and the transition to the School Wide Positive Behavior Support program will be discussed. Data will be presented on the decrease in behavioral incidents and use of punitive procedures. Routine, treatment integrity data were collected and will also be discussed as well as strategies for improving the implementation fidelity. Discussions of the modifications and strategies for improving buy in and support from staff will also be discussed. Special focus will be placed on the implementation challenges and successes specific to the population served and staff implementing the program. In addition, strategies used to decrease the use of punitive procedures will be highlighted and suggestions for clinicians will be provided
Challenges and Successes of a School Wide Positive Behavior Support Program in a Small, Urban Private School Serving Children With Emotional Behavioral Disorders
Kathy Tomon (Melmark), Edward (Chris) C. Vonderschmidt (Yale School), AMY FREDRICK (The Y.A.L.E. School), Amanda Guld Fisher (Temple University)
Abstract: This paper presentation will review the implementation of a School Wide Positive Behavior Support program in a new and growing school in an urban, inner-city area serving children with autism and emotional support needs. Many students also had dual diagnoses and were receiving additional services. Data will be presented on the effectiveness of the program to decrease behavioral incidents. Discussion will include a focus on staff training, treatment integrity, and implementing a School Wide Positive Behavior Support program in a new school while simultaneously training new staff and administration. Treatment integrity data was monitored regularly and will be discussed. Data-based decisions will be reviewed detailing modifications made to the program as well as the intricate balance of developing systems that will be effective and acceptable to staff and administrations. Implications for the dual diagnosis population will be discussed as well as suggestions for staff training and ensuring fidelity of implementation.
 

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