IT should be notified now!

Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search
Donate to SABA Capital Campaign
Portal Access Behavior Analysis Training Directory Contact the Hotline View Frequently Asked Question
ABAI Facebook Page Follow us on Twitter LinkedIn LinkedIn

43rd Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2017

Event Details

Previous Page

 

Symposium #112
CE Offered: BACB
A Scientific Approach to Inclusion in the Elementary School Setting: The CABAS® Accelerated Independent Learner Model of Instruction
Saturday, May 27, 2017
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Convention Center 403/404
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: JoAnn Pereira Delgado, Ph.D.
Chair: JoAnn Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract: The Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) model is based on the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling model and applies the principles of behavior analysis to the general education setting. The students in these classrooms present with and without disabilities and may qualify for free or reduced lunch. Students academically perform within a range from below to above grade level and are continuously assessed for the presence of developmental cusps and capabilities according to the Verbal Behavior Development theory. We have identified Naming, observational learning, joint stimulus control across saying and writing and social listener reinforcement as key development milestones. Once students acquire these, they can profit in the inclusion setting. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the Verbal Behavior Development Theory and practices as it applies to inclusion across grades K -5. We will also present on how the teachers in the AIL model arrange the curriculum and objectives. Lastly, we will discuss how we move students along the developmental trajectory so they can be successful in the general education setting.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Naming, Observational Learning, VBD Theory
Preparing Students With Disabilities for a Successful Transition to the General Education Setting
LAURA DARCY (Morris School District), JoAnn Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: Inclusion is a valuable and important practice in the American school system. According to IDEA (2004), all students are entitled to a free and appropriate public education, in the least restrictive environment. This right is extended to students regardless of gender, religion, race, or ability. For the purposes of this presentation, inclusion refers specifically to the inclusion of students with special needs in general education classrooms to the fullest extent possible. It is critical to identify how students can be successful in a general education setting in order to employ best educational practices when it comes to inclusion. Psychological and educational literature rightfully suggest that the onus of student success lies in school policy and teacher ability; however, the Verbal Behavior Development Theory (Greer & Ross, 2008) has also defined specific developmental cusps and capabilities that can contribute heavily to student success in a general education setting. In this presentation we will present an overview of the procedures utilized in the CABAS AIL model of instruction utilized in self-contained (special education settings) for a transition to a less-restrictive inclusion environment in AIL classrooms. Scientifically-based methods, criterion referenced target behaviors as well as collaboration between general and special educators are essential to successful transitions.
Effective Inclusion in the General Education Setting: Successful Transitions within the Accelerated Independent Learner Model, Grades K-2
LARA GENTILINI (Teachers College, Columbia University), JoAnn Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: Within the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS®) educational model, the Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) approach to teaching in the general education setting promotes individualized instruction for students at varying academic and verbal levels. The verbal developmental cusps that students have in repertoire determine their access to new communities of reinforcement and contingencies. Without certain necessary cusps, the child cannot effectively engage in the various means of teaching and learning; namely, the student cannot learn as effectively and efficiently through choral responding, peer-tutoring, personalized systems of instruction (PSI), and other small-group instructional tactics. The cusps that are relevant for successful inclusion and instruction within a kindergarten to second grade CABAS® AIL classroom include listener literacy; conditioned reinforcement for observing books and other two-dimensional stimuli; transcription (see-write); dictation (hear-write); technical and aesthetic writing; textual responding at 80 words per minute; reading governs responding; transformation of stimulus function across saying and writing; and writer self-editing. The Naming and observational learning capabilities of each student are also of particular importance, as a student without these capabilities in repertoire will require direct teaching and consequation for all operants, making it less effective for him or her to learn via small-group instruction or through model demonstration learn units (MDL).
Effective Inclusion in the General Education Setting: Successful Transitions within the Accelerated Independent Learner Model in Grades 3-5
BRITTANY DIANNE BLY (Teacher's College Columbia University), JoAnn Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: Inclusion classroom settings are prevalent throughout the US education system. In a CABAS Accelerated Independent Learning (AIL) model, inclusion is the reality of all instruction. In the upper elementary school setting (grades 3-5) specific learning cusps and capabilities are required in order to have a successful transition into an AIL inclusion setting. Naming, Observational Learning, and Audience Control must be induced before a student can learn effectively in an AIL setting. Repertoires required to learn in this setting are read-do correspondence, which enables students to work on a Personalized System of Instruction (PSI), joint stimulus control across saying and writing, and Dictation (hear-write). Implementing algorithms to affect student writing in math and English language arts enables the students technical writing to precisely affect reading behavior, and self-editing. Students who are in an inclusion setting can become independent learners by acquiring these repertoires and will continue to demonstrate progressive learning.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE ABAI HOTLINE