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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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43rd Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2017

Event Details

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Symposium #380
CE Offered: BACB
Behavior Analysis in Higher Education: Enhancing Student Engagement and Success in Online Learning Formats
Monday, May 29, 2017
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Convention Center 403/404
Area: EDC
CE Instructor: Debra Berry Malmberg, Ph.D.
Chair: Debra Berry Malmberg (California State University, Northridge)
Discussant: Cheryl J. Davis (Dimensions Consulting; SupervisorABA)
Abstract: Despite the popularity of online coursework, little research exists to directly compare pedagogical strategies in the online higher education setting. In this symposium, two studies that investigated the effects of various online pedagogies are presented. In the first study, the authors examined the pair discussion component of interteaching in an online graduate rehabilitation course. The first condition included all key components of interteaching, whereas the second condition involved all components of interteaching, with the exception of pair discussion. The pair discussion condition resulted in higher student quiz scores, and social validity findings indicated the majority of students reported preference for interteaching with the inclusion of the pair discussion component than without. In the second study, a Psychology course was enhanced with elements of gamification (e.g., narrative, badges, goals, feedback). The authors compared the effects of the gamified online instruction to traditional online instruction. Results included mixed findings of effectiveness of the components of gamification compared to traditional online instruction. The implications of these two investigations to online teaching pedagogy will be discussed.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): higher education, online education, student performance
Utilization of Interteaching Technology in Online Education: Tools and Tips for Success
(Applied Research)
JAMES L. SOLDNER (University of Massachusetts Boston), Rocio Rosales (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
Abstract: Interteaching, an empirically supported behavioral teaching method has been recently and successfully introduced in the college classroom. Historically, most interteaching studies have been conducted in didactic classroom settings. To date, no published interteaching studies have utilized an online course format. Furthermore, no component analysis of the pair discussion component of interteaching has been published. Therefore, the present study was intended to examine the pair discussion component of interteaching in an online graduate rehabilitation course. Two conditions were randomly assigned across participants and sessions. The first condition included all key components of interteaching in which student dyads were placed in breakout rooms to discuss the assigned preparation guide. The second condition involved all components of interteaching, with the exception of pair discussion. In this condition students were placed in breakout rooms to complete the preparation guide on their own. Average student quiz scores were compared across conditions. The pair discussion condition resulted in higher student quiz scores, p < .01. Additionally, social validity findings indicated the majority of students reported preference for interteaching with the inclusion of the pair discussion component than without. Finally, limitations of the present study and future directions for interteaching technology in online education will be discussed.
Gamified! An Evaluation of the Effects of Gamification in an Undergraduate Online Course
(Applied Research)
DEBRA BERRY MALMBERG (California State University, Northridge), Jose Solares (California State University, Northridge), Tara A. Fahmie (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract: Online education has become increasingly popular, despite research demonstrating reduced communication between students and instructors, reduced student participation, and decreased levels of student engagement as compared to traditional courses (Hrastinski, 2007; Flores-Morador, 2013). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamification on numerous student behaviors in an online Psychology course, including: a) student performance on quizzes, b) the percentage of students who completed weekly coursework, c) the percentage of students who met recommended early deadlines, d) the percentage of supplemental materials accessed, e) audience retention of class videos, f) percentage of students who passed the course, and g) the outcomes of a survey derived from the National Survey Student Engagement (NSSE). A group design was used to compare the gamified section (n=328) of the course to a traditional online section (n=356). The pedagogical elements employed in the gamified version of the course were narration, levels, badges, choices, goals, and feedback. The implications of this study for the adoption of gamification in higher education settings will be discussed.
 

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