Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Event Details

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Poster Session #300
Sunday, May 24, 2020
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Hall D
Chair: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
75.

Behavior-Based Safety: The Difference Between Immediate and Delayed Feedback on Safe Performances

Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
MARIA GATTI (Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis), Gianluca Aldo Ghezzi (Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis), Anna Losi (AARBA), Giuliana Spirito (AARBA)
Discussant: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract:

One of the main steps of the Behaviour-Based Safety protocol is feedback delivery. Although the effectiveness of feedback in improving performances is widely supported, there are only a few studies regarding the importance of timing in feedback delivery processes. Is there a difference based on the temporal placement of feedback on workers’ performances? What’s the effectiveness of different temporal locations of feedback? In order to answer these questions, an experimental research was conducted in a manufactural factory: operational lines and warehouses of 2 different plants of Mitsubishi located in Pavia (Italy) were subjected to immediate feedback (i.e. post performance) or delayed feedback (i.e. during the weekly safety meeting). The results showed that both immediate and delayed feedback increased the percentage of safe performances carried out by workers. However, weekly feedback was more effective as it led to a higher number of safe operations than immediate feedback and in a shorter time.

 
76.

A New Safety Measure for Workers: Location Identification Using Information and Communication Techonology Devices

Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
SHOKEN SHIMIZU (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan), Koichi Ono (Komazawa University), Christoph F. Bördlein (University of Applied Sciences Würzburg-Schweinfurt), Rieko Hojo (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health)
Discussant: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract:

We have examined the effectiveness of a safety support system with different dimensions. The system was newly established in our laboratory and was named the Safeguarding Supportive System (SSS). We focused on measurement of locations of workers and machines at a few industrial sites in Japan. In the present study, the location between single worker and single machine was identified, measured, compared and analyzed with different kinds of ICT devices. In experiments 1, 2 and 3, location identifications between a single worker and a single machine, between several workers and a single machine, and several workers and several machines were accomplished, respectively. All results showed that ICT devices contribute to support workers’ safety behavior. The results of the present study suggested that optimal usage of adequate ICT devices would help collaborative safety with workers and machines. Now we are planning to use laser camera in three-dimensional work spaces.

 
77.

Instruction Effects for Identification of Safety Equipment

Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
RIEKO HOJO (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health), Koichi Ono (Komazawa University), Christoph F. Bördlein (University of Applied Sciences Würzburg-Schweinfurt), Shoken Shimizu (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan)
Discussant: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract:

We examined instruction effects for identification of safety equipment using pictures to people with different experience history. We made 100 pictures of workers wearing wrong or correct equipment. Those pictures were shown to subjects in the safety class. About 50 subjects in each group were divided into two groups. One group was fully instructed about safety equipment. On the other hand, subjects in another group did not receive anything about it. Those pictures were projected on the screen of the display in the classes. Each picture was provided for 2 seconds, then automatically shifted to the next one. Subjects wrote answers after appearing each picture. Results were shown that correct rate was not consisted with subjects’ history. In addition, there were not significant difference between groups of full instruction and no instruction. It was suggested that some pictures did not clearly show the objects of safety equipment.

 
78. Use of Organizational Behavior Management to Increase Use of Protective Equipment
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
DEBORAH TORRES (The May Institute, Inc), Clare Liddon (The May Institute, Inc. ), Eileen Fuentes (The May Institute, Inc.)
Discussant: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract: Organizational Behavior Management offers solutions to improve workers’ performance, across a variety of work contexts. Human service staff that work directly with individuals with potentially dangerous, maladaptive behaviors may be required to wear protective equipment as a key in maintaining the safety of themselves and the individuals they serve. Cooperation with wearing appropriate protective equipment can create a safe work environment for staff and a safe learning environment for individuals served. In the present case, task clarification and graphic feedback were used to increase the use of staff protective equipment at a group home within a residential school program, serving children with intellectual and developmental disabilities whom also engaged in severe problem behavior. Data were collected on individual staff cooperation with wearing of the appropriate equipment using a rating scale (i.e., “0” = no required equipment worn and “4” = all required equipment worn). Data collection occurred once per day. Rating scale scores were averaged across the group of staff on shift at the time of data collection. An evaluation of the results demonstrates task clarification and graphic feedback as effective in increasing appropriate wearing of required staff protective equipment.
 
79.

Identifying Barriers Within Behavior-Based Safety: A Pilot Inquiry to Inform Technological Solutions

Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
LUCA GIANI (University of West Florida; Behavior Factory), Dayna Beddick (University of West Florida), Leasha Barry (University of West Florida), Daniela Gatti (libero professionista)
Discussant: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract:

Behavior-Based Safety (BBS) is the application of the science of behavior to increase workplace safety. Although BBS is highly flexible and applicable to a myriad of industrial contexts, applied variables likely hinder success in practice. These variables may be addressed by individual consultants, however a literature review demonstrated little systematic investigation of these common barriers in application. Moreover, rapidly changing technological developments designed to address workplace safety in conjunction with changes to the work-place environment may also impact the success of BBS in unknown ways. To begin to identify variables which may act as barriers within the field of BBS, a brief inquiry will be administered to respondents affiliated with self-identified BBS professional organizations. Responses will be analyzed with suggested technological solutions to increase BBS success. These solutions will also address common concerns with the practice of collecting mass quantities of data without planed use for the information collected. Our findings are expected to provide important implications for applied BBS practice, as well as provide the framework for forthcoming studies regarding implementation of derived solutions in these contexts.

 
80. A Comparison of the Effects of Various Types of Gateway on the Reduction of Speeding Behavior at a Pedestrian Crossing
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Sung Jun Lim (Chung-Ang University), JIHAN CHOI (Chung-Ang University), Eunju Choi (Western Michigan University ), Shezeen Oah (Chung Ang University)
Discussant: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract: This study compared the effects of four different types of gateways on the reduction of speeding behavior at a pedestrian crossing in a school zone: low/single, high/single, low/multiple, and high/multiple gateways. The single gateway consisted of a single pair of traffic posts installed at the pedestrian crossing. The multiple gateway consisted of ten pairs of traffic posts, each pair 1.5 m apart from one another, installed along the street starting from the pedestrian crossing. The heights of high and low gateways were 2.3 meters and 1.3 meters above the ground level, respectively. The speeds of vehicles passing through the pedestrian crossing were measured using speed guns. The data were collected for an hour every weekday for 17 weeks. An ABCBADE design was adopted: baseline (A), low/single (B), high/single (C), low/multiple (D), and high/multiple (E) conditions. The results indicated that the four types of gateways were all effective, but the most effective condition was the high/multiple gateway condition followed by the low/multiple and high/single conditions, then the low/single condition.
 
81. Precisely Teaching Disaster Response: An Evaluation of SAFMEDS on Teaching Disaster Response
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
IRA MEINHOFER (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John W. Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Shannon Ormandy (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract: The use of SAFMEDS cards are generally represented in the literature as an efficacious fluency building tool. Many studies have focused on learners in formal academic settings such as high school or college classrooms. We investigated the use of SAFMEDS as an enhancement to current training curriculum methods provided to volunteers by the American Red Cross. Three Red Cross disaster volunteers participated in the study over a 4-week period. Results showed using SAFMEDS complemented existing training methods and accelerated learning across different skills. The increase in learning maintained at 2-week follow-up.
 
82. Prolific Authors in the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management: Where Else Do They Publish?
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
DAVIS SIMMONS (University of Florida), Nicholas Matey (University of Florida ), Andressa Sleiman (Univeristy of Florida ), Nicole Gravina (University of Florida)
Discussant: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract: Sleiman et al. (under review) identified the top 20 most published authors in the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management. The goal of the current paper is to extend these findings to identify other publication outlets where prolific organizational behavior management (OBM) researchers publish. This information can be used to inform OBM researchers and practitioners of other journals to read and other publication avenues for OBM articles. Journals within behavior analysis (e.g., Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis) and outside of behavior analysis (e.g., Safety Science) are included.
 
83. The Effects of Performance Feedback on Organizational Citizenship Behavior: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
MARCO TAGLIABUE (OsloMet), Sigridur Soffia Sigurjonsdottir (Oslo Metropolitan University), Ingunn Sandaker (Oslo Metropolitan University/ OsloMet)
Discussant: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract: In an increasingly complex organizational scenario, performance feedback represents a requisite for retention and development. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to explore the direct relationship between feedback and organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB). Job satisfaction is one of the antecedents to OCB and discretionary effort is central to the definitions of OCB. Searches were conducted in relevant databases, collecting and consolidating results from peer-reviewed studies that reported measures of feedback and OCB of full-time workers. 15 studies, containing 21 measurement instances, met the inclusion criteria and the quality appraisal. The results are presented both as general findings from the meta-analysis and descriptive results. The average effect size of the measures of correlation between performance feedback and OCB was weak (radj = .28, CI = .21 - .34). Notably, studies reporting feedback properties featured weaker correlations to OCB than studies reporting feedback frequencies. Findings are discussed in light of a perspective of complexity: namely, the role of feedback on determining and sustaining functional extra-role organisational behaviour. Further research is needed to explore what type of feedback (positive or negative), how often (frequency), and in which way (properties) feedback is most effective in order to positively affect OCB levels.
 
84. An Analysis of Treatment Integrity Reporting in Behavior Analysis in Practice
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
ERIK SWANSON GODINEZ (California State University, Sacramento), Galan Falakfarsa (California State University, Sacramento), Denys Brand (California State University, Sacramento), Lea Jones (California State University, Sacramento), Deborah Christine Richardson (California State University, Sacramento), Colin Wills (California State University, Sacramento)
Discussant: Mary C. Scheeler (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract: Treatment integrity (TI) is the extent to which procedures are implemented in a manner consistent with their prescribed protocols and is important for drawing accurate conclusions about functional relations between treatments and changes in behavior. Despite its importance, behavior analytic journals rarely report TI data. The purpose of this review was to investigate how often the behavior analytic journal Behavior Analysis in Practice (BAP) report TI data. We reviewed all studies published in BAP from 2008 through 2018 (n = 367). Studies included in the review had to be experimental and have a method section. One hundred and forty eight studies (40.3%) were included for analysis. Of the 148 studies included, 65 (43.9%) reported TI data despite all studies operationally defining the independent variables. Conversely, 91.9% (n = 136) of studies reported interobserver agreement scores. The results showed that the percentage of studies reporting TI in BAP is consistent with findings from similar reviews across different journals. More research is needed to determine the exact reasons why TI data are not more frequently reported across behavior analytic journals.
 
 

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