Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Event Details

Previous Page

 

Poster Session #535
Monday, May 25, 2020
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Hall D
Chair: Choo Ying Lau (Bangor University)
56. Evaluating the Effects of Feedback Type in a Computer Assisted Learning Program
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
LISA HUNTER (University of Manitoba), Joseph J. Pear (University of Manitoba)
Discussant: Choo Ying Lau (Bangor University)
Abstract: Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction (CAPSI), is a computer assisted instruction system, that can be used for teaching and training individuals a variety of materials including behavioural procedures and assessments. Benefits of using CAPSI include convenience of completing the training from anywhere and at one’s own pace, and reducing time and resources to improve cost effectiveness. This raises the following question: how can CAPSI be made more effective? The following research study evaluated whether different types of feedback differentially affected both declarative and procedural knowledge while implementing a behavioural assessment called a functional analysis (FA). The types of feedback that will be evaluated and compared include textual feedback of Intervention A: Elaborative knowledge of results (e.g., an explanation of why the answer was correct) and textual feedback of Intervention B: Simple knowledge of results (e.g., “correct”). All participants were presented with each type of feedback alternated within each FA condition, in a modified alternating treatments design. Preliminary results demonstrate small differences in percentage of accuracy between interventions for procedural knowledge of 8 university students across four FA conditions.
 
57. An Online Interactive Video Tool for BCBA Supervision and Behavioral Consultation
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
FU LIN YU (CCABA), Shu-Hwei (Sue) Ke (University of Nevada, Reno)
Discussant: Choo Ying Lau (Bangor University)
Abstract: One of the fundamental needs in the remote consultation and behavior analysis training/certification industry is to securely share the recorded videos among different parties including behavior analysts such as BCBA supervisors and their trainees, school teachers, caregivers and parents. Wekair, an information technology and ABA service company, has developed an innovative, highly secure online behavior consultation platform with built-in interactive video annotations, personalized templates, integrated workflow and role-based assess permissions. It enables users to capture and upload videos to a secure cloud server with intuitive file management, dynamically share videos with user defined expiration timestamp to individuals or user groups. Users can add annotations including images, bookmarks, chapter menus, hypertext links, captions, comments, free drawings and pre-defined shapes, record voice messages, take online quiz, generate screenshots, answer questions in personalized template and mark the videos with the selected answers, all done directly on the selected video in a standalone web browsers like Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox. The platform is alive and has been verified to be a productive video-based consultation/supervision/training tool by some BCBAs and other professionals.
 
58. Setting and Adjusting Schedules of Reinforcement: A Systematic Review
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
AAISHAY HAQUE (Pennsylvania State University - Harrisburg), Jonathan W. Ivy (The Pennsylvania State University - Harrisburg )
Discussant: Choo Ying Lau (Bangor University)
Abstract: Reinforcement is a critical component of most interventions designed to change behavior. In attempting to change behavior to a meaningful degree, behavior analysts employ a broad range of reinforcement schedules. Although behavior analysts are trained on the defining characteristics of most schedules, there is limited guidance available to practicing behavior analyst on how to set an initial schedule of reinforcement and how to alter that schedule from the initial value. As a result, practitioners must often make arbitrary schedule decisions, which may comprise the efficiency of treatment programing. The purpose of this review is to examine existing literature for recommendations and guidelines regarding setting initial schedules of reinforcement and adjusting these schedules across a client’s treatment progression, age and/or settings. With the use of a published, pre-compiled list of the most frequently assigned readings in behavior analysis graduate training programs as well as some additional texts, we conducted a systematic review to assess the content related to schedules of reinforcement. Out of the eight pieces of literature reviewed, six contained a section or more to schedules of reinforcement, however none of the reviewed texts outlined recommendations nor provided guidelines on how to set an adjust these schedules for practitioners.
 
59. Teaching Graduate Students to Create High-Quality, Single-Case Design Graphs Using a Video Tutorial
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CHRISTOPHER J. PERRIN (Georgian Court University), Ian Bober (Georgian Court University), Bria Donovan (Georgian Court University), Katelynn Wiamer (Georgian Court University), Nicolette Mauro (Georgian Court University), Shaun Kloby (Georgian Court University)
Discussant: Choo Ying Lau (Bangor University)
Abstract: Creating well-designed graphs is an essential skill for behavior analysts. As such, a number of studies have evaluated instructional methods (e.g., Carr & Burkholder, 1998; Tyner & Fienup, 2015). Recently, Mitteer, Greer, Fisher, & Cohrs (2018) demonstrated the effectiveness of video tutorial (VT) in teaching behavior therapists to create single-subject design graphs using GraphPad Prism. GraphPad Prism offers many features required to create publication-quality graphs without the “workarounds” the researchers cited as associated with Microsoft Excel. Despite this benefit, Microsoft Excel remains less costly and more widely available than GraphPad Prism, often pre-installed on Windows-based PCs. Given this ease of access, and perhaps less sensitivity to the limitations of Microsoft Excel when generating graphs for clinical use, ABA practitioners may be more likely to use Microsoft Excel. Although VTs for creating graphs in Microsoft Excel are readily available on the internet, the accuracy and efficacy of those VTs is unknown. In the present study, we created a VT and demonstrated its effectiveness at teaching ABA graduate students with no prior graphing experience to create publication-quality graphs in Microsoft Excel. In addition, we evaluated maintenance of graphing skills and the utility of VT at retraining skills following long delays.
 
60.

Using Behavioral Skills Training and Video Examples to Teach Undergraduates to Identify the Function of Behaviors

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
ELIANA SEGAL (James Madison University), Daniel D. Holt (James Madison University), Trevor F. Stokes (James Madison University)
Discussant: Choo Ying Lau (Bangor University)
Abstract:

The present study investigated the relative effectiveness and efficiency of three different training sequences in teaching undergraduate students in psychology and/or special education to identify the function of undesirable behaviors in video examples. The study also evaluated whether the procedures were effective in promoting the generalization from videos of role-played practitioner-child interactions to videos of children displaying undesirable behaviors similar to those depicted in the training videos, but in naturalistic environments. Behavior skills training (BST) and multiple exemplar training were utilized in all three training sequences. The data were analyzed through a multiple baseline across participants embedded within a stacked AB or ABC design with comparison across participants. The data, data analysis, and discussion on the poster reflect just one participant. Replication is currently in progress and data from at least five other participants will be available by the time of the ABAI conference. At that time, a brief summary of the results will be included in the abstract.

 
61. Choice in Behavior Analysis: A Systematic Review of Concurrent-Operant Assessments and Interventions
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
KACEY RENEE FINCH (West Virginia University), Rebecca Kolb (University of Minnesota ), Kathryn M. Kestner (West Virginia University)
Discussant: Choo Ying Lau (Bangor University)
Abstract: Concurrent-operant arrangements are becoming increasingly popular assessment and intervention methods in clinical and educational settings. We conducted a systematic review of the trends in the applied choice literature published in peer-reviewed journals in the last 15 years. For example, Smeltzer et al. (2009) provided individuals with the option to choose the sequence of academic tasks to complete prior to starting a work period. All three participants demonstrated preference for the choice condition relative to the condition in which experimenters chose the task sequence order. Task engagement increased and problem behavior decreased for two out of three participants. We will also present our classification system for categorizing choice as an independent variable, including choice assessments, choice as an antecedent or consequence, concurrent-operant DRA interventions, and varying consequences to shift from impulsive to self-control choice. Finally, we will identify the current "best practice" recommendations for arranging concurrent-operant assessments and interventions based on the literature and recommend areas for future research.
 
62.

Gamification of Discrete Trail Training on a Touchscreen Device: Pilot Evaluation With the PEAK Relational Training System

Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
LINDSEY AUDREY MARIE DENNIS (Missouri State University), Ray Burke (The Prevention Group), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University)
Discussant: Choo Ying Lau (Bangor University)
Abstract:

Gamification in education describes the process of enhancing motivational affordances by using technology to invoke appetitive experiences and achieve stronger behavioral outcomes (Hamari et al., 2014). Discrete trial training is pervasive within behavior analytic instruction due to the potential for a high rate of trials allowing for direct targeting of language skills. The format of discrete trial training is uniquely well situated for gamification by presenting clear discriminative stimuli, requiring a specific response, and rewarding the correct response through points, tokens, or more direct forms of reinforcement. We developed two algorithms for developing discrete trial training programming on Microsoft PowerPoint, a tool that is familiar and available to most practicing behavior analysts, allowing for delivery on a touchscreen device. The first presents a sample and array, where the sample is randomized along with the array stimuli and locations. The second presents a randomized sample stimulus followed by a customizable time delay and the randomized array. Both algorithms were pilot tested across three individuals with autism attending a specialized program. Pilot testing was successful in refining the algorithm and the participants acquired the target skills quickly following instruction delivered on the touchscreen device.

 
63.

Proactively Training Graduate-Level Students Through Tiered Consultation to Promote Effective Behavior Management

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
EMILY DEFOUW (Munroe-Meyer Institute; University of Massachusetts-Boston), Morgan Elridge (Munroe-Meyer Institute), Zachary Charles LaBrot (University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Discussant: Choo Ying Lau (Bangor University)
Abstract:

Antecedent-based supports (i.e., prompts, reminders) are proactive strategies that set the occasion for a specific behavior to occur (e.g., implementation, treatment integrity). Consequence-based supports (e.g., performance feedback) are summative, yet reactive supports that occur after a behavior (e.g., low levels of treatment adherence, low levels of Behavior Specific Praise, BSP). Previous research has examined these strategies on student and educator behaviors. However, little is known on trainee behaviors. The current study was conducted in academic clinic at a university-based academic health center in an urban Midwestern city with four, second-year female graduate-level School Psychology students. A concurrent multiple baseline across participants was utilized to examine the effectiveness of tiered consultation on students’ rate of BSP, the dependent variable. BSP was recorded using a 10-sec interval and converted to rate. Students received group didactic instruction as Tier 1. Students were randomly staggered in Tier 2 (Antecedent Strategy = Emailed Prompts) and Tier 3 (Consequential Strategy = DPF) based on low rates of BSP (i.e., BSP once per 2 minutes). Data collection is ongoing. Initial results indicate an increase in BSP during Tier 2 for two students. Results suggest that tiered consultation supports are an effective strategy to promote BSP.

 
64.

Behaviors That Define Good Teaching Practice From the Perspective of Students

Area: TBA; Domain: Basic Research
HORTENSIA HICKMAN (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, FES-Iztacala), Sergio Mendez (FES-Iztacala, UNAM), Maria Luisa Cepeda Islas Islas (FES Iztacala UNAM), Martha Alarcón (FES-Iztacala, UNAM)
Discussant: Choo Ying Lau (Bangor University)
Abstract:

The evaluation of teaching practice in universities and its impact on the quality of the teaching-learning process is one of the most difficult skills to measure. In general terms, skills in methodology, evaluation and attitudes towards students define a good teacher. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the psychology students' opinions about the practice of their teachers. A descriptive non-experimental study was performed. The data were collected from a digital scale that evaluates the opinion of the teaching practice. This scale was applied to students who enrolled in the 2018-1 semester in a public university. The overall results of 900 tests show: a) high marks in the teaching practice that are related to behaviors based on the teaching methodology and the aspects of attitude. In other words, those skills that are related to the teaching-learning process, with didactic strategies, with the experience of knowledge and with the set of sources of attitude that promote students' motivation towards the class; b) low grades in the monitoring and fulfillment of the school program, this means the interaction between the activities carried out in the classroom by the teacher and those demanded by the institution in terms of delivering and following the program of studies of the specific subject; maintaining congruence with its content. This ability also refers to the establishment, maintenance and adjustment of the evaluation criteria and their congruence with the purposes of the subject. Specific teaching programs are proposed.

 
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE