Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Event Details

Previous Page

 

Symposium #566
CE Offered: BACB
Application of Behavior Analytic Approaches to Increase Sport Skills
Monday, May 25, 2020
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 5
Area: CSS/CBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Annette Griffith (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Raymond G. Miltenberger (University of South Florida)
CE Instructor: Robin Arnall, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Behavior analytic procedures have been effective at improving various sport skill topographies across many sports (e.g., golf, yoga, football). This symposium will examine four studies which utilize different procedures across sports involving TAGteach and vocal contingencies (dance), a treatment package combining TAGteach with precision teaching and vocal contingencies (dance), a component analysis of behavioral coaching utilizing video modeling with feedback (hockey), and a treatment package including public posting, goal setting with feedback, and text messaging to decrease head injuries (football). Implications for practice will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): public posting, sports, TAGteach, video modeling
Target Audience:

Individuals who are wanting to use behavior analytic strategies in the area of health, sports, or fitness.

 
Comparing randomized vocal consequences to TAGteach™ to teach novel dance movements to adults
ROBIN ARNALL (The Sage Colleges, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Annette Griffith (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Kathryn L. Kalafut (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Jack Spear (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Laurie Bonavita (Bay Path University)
Abstract: In the Behavior Analytic literature, TAGteach™ methods of instruction have been applied to various sports-related topographies (e.g., football pass blocking, golf swing). For this study, TAGteach was used for two participants to teach inexperienced (i.e., no dance training prior), neurotypical adults aged 28-43 novel dance movements. Results indicated that for both participants TAGteach was more effective than randomized vocal contingencies (e.g., “great,” “not quite”) for increasing skill acquisition of the targeted movements across a multiple baseline of behaviors (movements). At two week and four week maintenance follow ups, both participants maintained higher percentages of correct dance movement step demonstration than were displayed during baseline or the vocal contingency phase.
 
Comparing TAGteach™ and precision teaching to vocal contingencies to teach novel dance movements to adults
Robin Arnall (The Sage Colleges, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), MARIAH MUSSETTER (University of Kansas), Annette Griffith (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Kathryn L. Kalafut (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Jack Spear (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Laurie Bonavita (Bay Path University)
Abstract: In the Behavior Analytic literature, TAGteach™ methods of instruction have been used in many sports (e.g., yoga, martial arts, football, etc.), while precision teaching has been mostly overlooked. For this study, a treatment package combining TAGteach and precision teaching was used for two participants (neurotypical adults aged 31-42) to teach novel dance movements. Results indicated that for both participants the treatment package was more effective than randomized vocal contingencies (e.g., “great,” “not quite”) for increasing skill acquisition of the targeted movements across a multiple baseline of behaviors (movements). At two week and four week maintenance probes, both participants maintained higher percentages of correct dance movement step demonstration than were displayed during baseline or the vocal contingency phase.
 
Component Analysis of a Behavioral Coaching Package on Hockey Skating Skills
LAURIE BONAVITA (TCSPP), Kathryn L. Kalafut (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Annette Griffith (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Julie A. Ackerlund Brandt (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology ), Nicole Barton (AZABA)
Abstract: Using a multiple treatment design, this study evaluated the components of video modeling, praise specific feedback, and video modeling and praise specific feedback on the performance of 3 experienced hockey skaters. Also assessed was whether the behavioral changes in practice sessions generalized to game play. The dependent variables were skater performance on three components considered necessary in technically correct hockey skating form. The components of technically correct skating form included, the push angle of the legs, the position of the arms, and the angle at which the skate blade contacted the ice. The results show that interventions including video modeling were effective in improving player performance; however, those improvements did not consistently maintain in practice sessions. These changes did however generalize to game play. Social validity indicated that each participant identified the dependent variable that produced the most effective results as preferred.
 

Decreasing Severe Head Collisions in American Football With a Behavioral Coaching Treatment Package

BRANDON LOGAN (Bay Path University), Laurie Bonavita (Bay Path University, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Melissa Hunsinger Harris (Bay Path University), Susan Ainsleigh (Bay Path University)
Abstract:

This study employs tactics proven effective with multiple sports, derived from the science of applied behavior analysis, to decrease severe head collision in American Football. The study included members of a high school football team that play specifically on the defensive side of the ball. Defenders are specifically targeted as they are 4 times more likely to endure a head injury, compared to their offensive counterparts (Sobue et al., 2018), as tackling results in 67% of the concussion in football (Gessel et al., 2007). Data collection occurred on the team’s designated practice field. The dependent variable in the current study is the percentage of correct tackles exhibited, measured from a predetermined performance criterion. A combination of a multiple baseline and changing criterion design, following a baseline condition visually demonstrate the results of the study. The independent variable was a treatment package consisting of public posting, goal setting and feedback and text messaging to provide additional feedback to participants.

 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE