Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Event Details

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Poster Session #93
Saturday, May 23, 2020
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Hall D
Chair: Michael Passage (Florida Institute of Technology)
97.

Zooming In and Out: How Industrial/Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior Management can Inform One Another

Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
SOUNDARYA KANTHIMATHINATHAN (Appalachian State University), Erin Anne Marion (Appalachian State University), Timothy D. Ludwig (Appalachian State University)
Discussant: Michael Passage (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Industrial/Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior Management study many of the same phenomena despite developing from disparate scientific paradigms. Industrial/Organizational Psychology relies on cognitive and social psychology to understand and predict organizational phenomena using statistical analyses, while Organizational Behavior Management contextualizes behavior into contingencies to design interventions on these same phenomena (Bucklin, Alvero, Dickinson, Austin & Jackson, 2000). Successful post-intervention behavior change validates behavioral analysis. This study proposes a framework for translating eleven conventional I/O Psychology constructs, ranging from diversity & inclusion (West, Tjosvold, & Smith, 2003) to self-efficacy (Bandura, 1977), into effective behavioral interventions. The framework consists of several steps: (1) identify a construct of business relevance, (2) pinpoint behaviors that capture the essence of the construct, (3) analyze related contingencies, and (4) develop a contingency design for intervention. Practitioners of both fields can benefit from this translational process to implement more effective interventions: Industrial/Organizational Psychologists benefit by applying behavior analysis and Organizational Behavior Management practitioners benefit by leveraging covert psychological processes. The researchers offer a scientific critique of this translational process to encourage continuous improvement of knowledge sharing between the fields of Industrial/Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior Management.

 
98.

Varying Feedback Accuracy Following Mastery: Preliminary Findings

Area: OBM; Domain: Basic Research
GALAN FALAKFARSA (California State University, Sacramento), Denys Brand (California State University, Sacramento), Joshua Bensemann (The University of Auckland, New Zealand), Lea Jones (California State University, Sacramento)
Discussant: Michael Passage (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Performance feedback consists of providing information about past performance and indicating how to improve future performance. Feedback is one of the most frequently used procedures for changing behavior within organizational settings. However, despite its successful application across a variety of organizational settings, much remains unknown about how it acts to change behavior and increase performance. Previous research involving computerized work tasks has shown that inaccurate feedback can delay or impede skill acquisition. Such studies typically only assess the detrimental effects of inaccurate feedback when acquiring new skills; very little is known about how inaccurate feedback affects skills that have been mastered. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of varying feedback accuracies following skill mastery in undergraduate students when completing a computerized match-to-sample task. Participants initially completed 250 trials with 100% accurate feedback before completing an additional 250 trials with varying levels of feedback accuracy (i.e., 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, and 20%). Data show that the mean number of correct responses per condition during the additional 250 trials decrease as the proportion of trials with inaccurate feedback increases.

 
99. Utilizing a Behavioral-Systems Approach to Understanding Academic Administration
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
EDWARD BRANDON AMEZQUITA (University of North Texas), Traci M. Cihon (University of North Texas), Williams Adolfo Espericueta (University of North Texas), Kyosuke Kazaoka (University of North Texas)
Discussant: Michael Passage (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: A Behavioral Systems Analysis (Malott, 2003) was conducted for a college advising office to support their preparations to meet the forthcoming initiatives of the college strategic plan. Through consultations with the college and advising department administration five areas were selected for the focus of the analysis: the general advising process, the role and responsibility of work study students, retention planning, coordinating course schedules and sequencing, and communication flow. A series of interviews and observations were completed to develop visual representations of the macrosystem and organizational structure and function. Additional process and task analyses that corresponded to each of the aforementioned target areas and employee roles were also completed. The results of the analysis suggested three areas for further analysis and intervention: 1) create measures of employee performance, 2) strengthen communication channels between the advising office and academic departments, and 3) create a system by which retention data feedback to academic departments are used to inform and assess their corresponding retention plans.
 
100. A Brief Review of Preference Assessments in the Workplace
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
MICHAEL SIMONIAN (California State University, Sacramento), Denys Brand (California State University, Sacramento), Makenna Mason (California State University, Sacramento), Megan R. Heinicke (California State University, Sacramento)
Discussant: Michael Passage (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Stimulus preference assessments (SPAs) are procedures used to gauge a client’s relative preference for stimuli to use as potential reinforcers in a behavior change intervention. Identifying an effective reinforcer is critical to facilitate desired changes in behavior. Multiple methods of assessing stimulus preference are available, with research historically focusing on clinical populations with disabilities. A small body of research of preference assessment methodology in the workplace also exists. The current descriptive review included preference assessment articles from the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management published between 2000 and 2019. The objective of this review was to identify and synthesize trends in the organizational behavior management preference assessment literature, including the topic of study, SPA methods used, the stimuli used in SPAs and their cost, types of employees studied, and inclusions of reinforcer assessments. Ten studies met the inclusionary criteria of the review. This review identified five different topics of study, with rank-order and survey preference assessments being the most commonly used SPA methods, stimuli typically ranging between $0-10, and human service providers being the most common participants.
 
101. The Use of Collaborative Remote Communication to Increase Data Collecting Behavior by In-Home Service Staff
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
TING BENTLEY (The Faison Center), Brandon Scott Larson-McGuire (The Faison Center)
Discussant: Michael Passage (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Staff collected data is difficult to achieve consistently in this field. This problem intensifies when there are multiple staff working independently with little direct oversight. This study looks at data collection by a group of in-home care staff over the course of a year. First, data was collected on one client’s three problem behaviors via traditional pen and paper method and kept at the home. Each staff was required to fill out a rating scale on each problem behavior at the end of their shift. All data was reviewed weekly thus consequences for lack of data collection are delivered with great delays. Then, data was collected via MyWorkplace, a collaborative private group work space similar to many social media platforms. Data was reviewed almost instantaneously, and problems can be discussed among staff. It is hypothesized that an increase in the frequency in which staff collect data is due to the collaborative nature of the new collection method and the consequence for lack of data collection is immediate.
 
102. Pyramidal Behavior Skills Training to Teach Most-to-Least Prompting Procedures
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Daniel Edward Locke (Bancroft), DEAN GRISOFF (Bancroft; Rider University), Jessica A Fedezko (Bancroft), Matthew David Lasoski (Bancroft), Tracy L. Kettering (Bancroft; Rider University)
Discussant: Michael Passage (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Behavior skills training (BST) is an effective method to train staff to implement a variety of interventions. A disadvantage is the amount of time required to complete BST. This problem is amplified in workplaces that have large amounts of staff or staff in multiple locations (Parsons Royllson & Reid, 2013). Behavior analysts are able to reduce the amount of time spent in training by training staff using a pyramidal approach to train one group of trainers, who then train others (Page, Iwata, & Reid, 1982). In the current study, we adapted the BST procedures outlined by Parsons Royllson & Reid (2013) and trained three trainers in an adult day habilitation program to implement the steps of BST and a most-to-least prompting procedure. Following mastery, these trainers each used BST to train three additional day habilitation staff members on the most-to-least prompting procedure. Following training, all of the trainers were able to implement the BST procedures and train groups of three staff on the most-to-least prompting procedure. All nine staff members were also able to implement the most-to-least prompting procedures following BST.
 
103.

Effects of Accurate and Partially Contingent Inaccurate Feedback on Work Performance Under Two Different Work Conditions

Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
SUNG JUN LIM (Chung-Ang University), Shezeen Oah (Chung Ang University)
Discussant: Michael Passage (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

This study examined the effects of feedback accuracy on performance under two different work conditions. Under one work condition, participants could clearly see the outcome of their performance (i.e., visible condition). Under the other condition, they could not clearly see the outcome of their performance (i.e., non-visible condition). The independent variable consisted of three feedback conditions: accurate feedback, tripled inaccurate feedback, and one-third inaccurate feedback. Both the tripled and one-third inaccurate feedback were generated based on the actual performance from the previous sessions (i.e., inaccurate but partially contingent) and delivered at the beginning of the next sessions. One hundred sixty-three participants were randomly assigned to the six experimental conditions and asked to perform a simulated work task. The effects of the accurate and tripled feedback on performance were comparable but they were higher than the effect of the one-third inaccurate feedback under the visible work condition. Under the invisible work condition, however, the three feedback conditions did not produce differential impacts on performance.

 
104.

A Comparison of the Effects of Accurate and Non-Contingent Exaggerated Feedback on Work Performance Under Two Different Work Conditions

Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Sung Jun Lim (Chung-Ang University), JINKWAN KIM (Chung-Ang University), Shezeen Oah (Chung Ang University), Qinghua Piao (Chung-Ang University)
Discussant: Michael Passage (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

This study compared the effects of accurate feedback, non-contingent exaggerated feedback, and no feedback conditions on performance under two different work conditions. Participants under on work condition could clearly see the outcome of their performance (i.e., visible condition), but those under the other work condition could not clearly see the outcome of their performance (i.e., invisible condition). The non-contingent exaggerated feedback was generated by (1) yoking the feedback to the performance of the participants in the accurate feedback conditions and (2) multiplying the yoked feedback by two. One hundred sixty-nine participants were randomly assigned to the six experimental conditions and asked to perform a simulated work task. The accurate and exaggerated feedback conditions produced higher levels of performance than the no feedback condition under both work conditions. The exaggerated and accurate feedback produced similar levels of performance under the invisible work condition. Under the visible work condition, however, the exaggerated feedback was less effective than the accurate feedback.

 
105.

Use of Incentives to Increase Staff Participation In Training

Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
JAMES SHERMAN (Evergreen Center), Joseph M. Vedora (Evergreen Center)
Discussant: Michael Passage (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Staff working in residential treatment programs are often assigned trainings to complete to help them perform their jobs more effectively. When staff do not complete trainings employers frequently provide corrective feedback to them. However, such feedback may not have the desired effect of increasing staff participation. In the current study, staff were provided verbal and written feedback during baseline if they did not complete their assigned trainings by agency due dates. During the intervention phase, staff were offered incentives for completing quarterly trainings before a specified deadline. Once staff completed the assigned training, they were entered into a randomized drawing for gift cards to popular locations. Staff could earn more entries into the drawing for completing training earlier in the quarter. The results indicated that incentives increased the number of staff that completed the quarterly trainings. The implications of using incentives in a human service organization is discussed.

 
 

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