IT should be notified now!

Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search
Donate to SABA Capital Campaign
Portal Access Behavior Analysis Training Directory Contact the Hotline View Frequently Asked Question
ABAI Facebook Page Follow us on Twitter LinkedIn LinkedIn

42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Event Details

Previous Page

 

Symposium #300
CE Offered: BACB
Self-Monitoring/Management as an Intervention for Aberrant Behaviors
Monday, May 30, 2016
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Columbus Hall IJ, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jessica E. Frieder, Ph.D.
Chair: Jessica E. Frieder (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: This session will discuss the effectiveness of self-monitoring in treating individuals with aberrant behaviors. First, Self & Match, a self-monitoring intervention that has student-teacher match component and reinforcement, as an effective intervention that leads to increases in appropriate classroom behavior and decreases in maladaptive classroom behavior for students with an autism spectrum disorder in the classroom setting will be reviewed. Next, the application of the Self & Match system to a child diagnosed with autism who was at risk for being removed from his local school district and placed in a center based program for engaging in high rates of inappropriate language will be highlighted. Finally, the results of a peer feedback component on a self-management program will be discussed.
Keyword(s): aberrant behaviors, behavior intervention, self-management, self-monitoring
Effectiveness of Self and Match as an Intervention for Increasing Appropriate Classroom Behavior in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders
KATHARINE M. CROCE ("Self & Match")
Abstract: This study evaluated Self & Match, a self-monitoring intervention that has student-teacher match component and reinforcement, to improve appropriate classroom behavior of seven students diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, receiving applied behavior analytic services as a part of their Individualized Education Program (IEP). Using a multiple-baseline withinsubjects and across behaviors with a probe assessment design, the effectiveness of Self & Match was evaluated in the classroom setting. The results indicated that Self & Match is an effective intervention that leads to increases in appropriate classroom behavior and decreases in maladaptive classroom behavior for students with an autism spectrum disorder in the classroom setting.
"Self & Match" in the Schools: A Preliminary Analysis of Utilizing Self Management Procedures With Students at Risk for Alternative Educational Placements
ANDREW BULLA (Western Michigan University), Jessica E. Frieder (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: Self-Monitoring/Self-Management is an evidence-based intervention for managing aberrant behaviors in school settings, so much so it is often utilized as a tier two intervention in a Response to Intervention (RtI) framework. This presentation will discuss the successful application of the Self & Match" system, a self management motivational system, for a child diagnosed with autism who was at risk for being removed from his local school district and placed in a center based program for engaging in high rates of inappropriate language. Functional behavior assessment results will be discussed, as well as outcomes from the intervention. Implications for future research will also be reviewed.
Evaluating the Effects of Peer Supports on Self-Management
SEAN FIELD (Western Michigan University), Jessica E. Frieder (Western Michigan University), Richard W. Malott (Western Michigan University), Stephanie M. Peterson (Western Michigan University), Wayne Fuqua (Western Michigan University), Rodney D. Clark (Allegheny College)
Abstract: The use of self-management to assist with the management of problem behavior and to increase on-task academic behaviors has been demonstrated as an effective behavioral strategy. However, some common impediments to their wide spread use include the demands that are often placed on teachers and the ability of the student to maintain and generalize the repertoire. The current study evaluated the effects of a peer feedback component on a self-management program. Students were trained to implement a self-management procedure and then allowed to gain peer attention and feedback for achieving specific performance levels. The results of the study will be discussed followed by a discussion of the limitations of the current study and directions for future research.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

Modifed by Eddie Soh