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Association for Behavior Analysis International

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Event Details

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Symposium #385
CE Offered: BACB
Developing Social Repertories with Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Randolph, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: AUT
CE Instructor: Joseph H. Cihon, Ph.D.
Chair: Joseph H. Cihon (Autism Partnership)
Abstract: Individuals diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder have qualitative impairments in social behavior, which can range from withdrawing from others to a failure to develop meaningful friendships. These impairments in social behavior can lead to negative long term outcomes such as loneliness, depression, and, in the most extreme cases, thoughts or attempts of suicide. In this symposium, three papers will be presented that evaluated different interventions to improve the social behaviors for individuals diagnosed with autism. The first paper will describe a modified teaching interaction procedure to teach specific social skills to individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and who had an intellectual disability. The second paper evaluated the effects of conditioning social reinforcement to individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The third paper evaluated the methodological soundness of previous studies evaluating social stories, opinions of several behavior analysts on social stories, and, finally, comparing social stories to the cool versus not cool procedure. Throughout the entire symposium, the authors and discussant will provide clinical recommendations and ideas for future research.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): condition reinforcement, social stories, teaching interactions
Target Audience: BCBAs, graduate students
Learning Objectives: Pending
Using Teaching Interactions to Teach Social Skills to Children With Autism and Intellectual Disabilities
Aubrey Ng (St. Cloud State University), CHRISTINE MILNE (Autism Partnership Foundation), Kimberly A. Schulze (St. Cloud State University), Eric Rudrud (St. Cloud State University), Justin B. Leaf (Autism Partnership Foundation)
Abstract: Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have qualitative impairments in social behavior which can range from rejecting others to failure to develop meaningful friendships. Thus, it is important for researchers to evaluate various methodologies that engender social behavior. One methodology which has been implemented with may children diagnosed with autism, and has a growing body of empirical support, is the teaching interaction procedure (TIP). The TIP consists of labeling and describing the behavior, providing a meaningful rationale, breaking the skill into smaller components, teacher demonstration of the behavior, the learner role-playing the behavior, and the provision of the feedback. This study implemented a modified TIP to teach social skills to three children diagnosed with ASD and an intellectual disability. A multiple baseline design across social skills, replicated across participants, was utilized to evaluate the effects of the modified TIP. The results showed the TIP resulted in acquisition, maintenance, and generalized of the targeted social skills for all participants. Clinical implications and future directions will be discussed within the presentation.
Changing Preference From Tangible to Social Activities Through an Observation Procedure
JEREMY ANDREW LEAF (Autism Partnership), Misty Oppenheim-Leaf (Behavior Therapy and Learning Center), Justin B. Leaf (Autism Partnership Foundation), Ronald Leaf (Autism Partnership Foundation), John James McEachin (Autism Partnership), Mitchell T. Taubman (Autism Partnership)
Abstract: Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have qualitative impairments in social interactions and often prefer food or tangible reinforcement to social reinforcement. Therefore, therapists working with children diagnosed with ASD often utilize food or tangible items as reinforcers to increase appropriate behaviors or decrease aberrant behaviors. The goal of the present study was to shift childrens preference from a highly preferred tangible item to an initially non-preferred social reinforcer using an observational conditioning procedure. Participants observed a known peer engage in a simple task and select the social reinforcer that was not preferred by the participant. The observation procedure resulted in a shift of preference toward the social reinforcer with all participants. Maintenance data demonstrated that although the preference change did not endure for one of the participants, it was quickly re-established with additional observational trials. Results provided further support for the use of observational procedures to alter preferences. Clinical implications and future directions will be discussed within the presentation.
The Never Ending Story: A Methodological Review, Clinical Usage, and Evaluation of Social Stories
ERIN MITCHELL (Autism Partnership Foundation), Justin B. Leaf (Autism Partnership Foundation), Misty Oppenheim-Leaf (Behavior Therapy and Learning Center), Mitchell T. Taubman (Autism Partnership), Ronald Leaf (Autism Partnership Foundation), John James McEachin (Autism Partnership)
Abstract: This symposium will take a closer look at the methodological soundness of previous studies evaluating social stories, opinions of several behavior analysts on social stories, and, finally, comparing social stories to the cool versus not cool procedure. First, 41 studies were reviewed which evaluated social stories for individuals diagnosed with autism. Results of this analysis showed the majority of studies either showed a partial demonstration or no clear demonstration that the social story procedure was responsible for observed behavior change. Second, we sent surveys to over 500 BCBA’s or BCaBA’s on their use of social stories and their perception of the research on social stories. Results of this survey revealed widespread use and mixed perceptions on the research on social stories. Finally, we compared social stories to the cool versus not cool procedure for individuals diagnosed with ASD. Using an adapted alternating treatment design we taught each participant three social skills with each procedure. The cool versus not cool procedure resulted in rapid skill acquisition while the social stories resulted in no skill acquisition. Clinical implications and future research will be discussed
 

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