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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Event Details

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Symposium #416
If I Were You and You Were Me: Clinical Applications of Perspective Taking Protocols
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Crystal Ballroom B, Hyatt Regency, Green West
Area: CBM/VRB
Chair: Alyson Giesemann (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
Abstract: Perspective taking is an important skill in the interaction of humans. Perspective taking can be defined as the ability to understand ones own experience as separate from another individuals experience. It is typically studied in developmental psychology using Theory of Mind Tasks. Relational Frame Theory offers a behavioral conceptualization of perspective taking as based in deictic relational responding relational responses that involve discrimination of a particular perspective (i.e., here vs. there, or now vs. then). This symposium explores deictic relational responding in children on the autism spectrum, individuals who are deaf, or individuals with traumatic brain injury. The first paper will extend previous research on the convergence between deictic relational responding and true and false beliefs in children with autism. The second paper will present data on teaching perspective taking skills to adults with TBI through established protocols, which utilize deictic relational frames. The third paper will review the literature on perspective taking in the Deaf and will offer an overview of the adaptation of the Deictic Relational Task for use with deaf individuals.
Keyword(s): autism, brain trauma, deaf community, perspective taking
Examining the Effects of Deictic Relation Training on Advanced Theory of Mind in Children With Autism
SAMANTHA BRODERICK (University of South Florida), Timothy M. Weil (Tandem Behavioral Health & Wellness)
Abstract: Perspective taking is a pivotal behavioral repertoire essential for social functioning, and is what some recognize as a hallmark deficit of the Autism Spectrum Disorder. Relational Frame Theory conceptualizes perspective taking in terms of deictic relational responding, or the ability to relate events based on the discrimination of a particular perspective. Advances in the study of deictic relational responding have included the development of a perspective taking training protocol shown to improve performance on false belief tasks in typically developing children; however, there has been little research on the generality of these findings in children with ASD. The role of deictic relational responding in social interaction is also undetermined. The following data extend on previous findings of the role of deictic relational responding on true and false belief and lend support to their application on advanced Theory of Mind tasks. Implications for promoting social skills in children with autism are also discussed.
Teaching Perspective Taking to Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury
JACQUELINE COHEN (University of South Florida), Timothy M. Weil (Tandem Behavioral Health & Wellness)
Abstract: Each year in the U.S., around 1.7 million people sustain a TBI and of those, approximately 52,000 die, 275,000 are hospitalized, and 1.365 million are treated and released from an emergency department. There are several factors which contribute to potential outcomes for people with TBI related disabilities, including the age at which the person sustained the injury, amount of time since the injury occurred, and the severity of the injury. Behavior analytic approaches to TBI recovery generally include basic behavior change programming involving both reduction and acquisition. One repertoire known to be severely affected after brain injury is perspective taking. The ability to take the perspective of another greatly contributes to social interactions and involves a complex set of skills. To date, behavior analysis has not shown the ability to adequately affect the re-acquisition of this repertoire. A small number of studies have attempted to train perspective taking skills in populations lacking the ability, but none with people with TBI. This study aimed to teach perspective taking skills to adults with TBI through established protocols, which utilize deictic relational frames.
Do You Hear What I See: Perspective Taking and Deictic Relational Responding in the Deaf
REBECCA COPELL (University of Louisiana at Lafayette), Emily Kennison Sandoz (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
Abstract: Perspective taking is the ability to understand one’s own experience, thoughts, and ideas as separate from another individual’s experience, thoughts, and ideas. In developmental psychological research, perspective taking is conceptualized in terms of Theory of Mind. In short, perspective taking is thought to be individuals’ understanding that others have minds. Tasks to assess theory of mind include but are not limited to the Sally-Anne test and false-photograph test. Data comparing Theory of Mind in Deaf vs. hearing individuals is mixed. This inconsistency may be attributable to cultural or language differences rather than actual perspective taking abilities. Relational Frame Theory offers a behavioral conceptualization of perspective taking as based in deictic relational responding – relational responses that involve discrimination of a particular perspective (i.e., here vs. there, or now vs. then). The Deictic Relational task was developed to assess perspective taking in terms of deictic relational responding. This paper will review the literature on perspective taking in Deaf individuals, and provides an overview of the adaptation of the Deictic Relational Task for use with Deaf individuals. Implications for further assessment and treatment development targeting perspective taking in the Deaf will be discussed.
 

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