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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Event Details

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Symposium #311
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Social Skills Interventions Within an Outpatient Clinic
Monday, May 30, 2016
4:00 PM–5:50 PM
Columbus Hall GH, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/DDA
CE Instructor: William Mauldin, M.S.
Chair: William Mauldin (Therapy Center of Acadiana)
Discussant: Angela M. Persicke (Autism Research Group, Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD))
Abstract: Expanding Sentences: The Therapy Center of Acadiana assists clients with autism in achieving goals associated with deficits related to social communication and social interaction. Relating to this, many clients� IEP and assessments indicate deficits related to the ability to form descriptive or expansive sentences. We designed a single case research model to increase the number of words in sentences. Increases in Reciprocal Conversation Behavior: A key part of forming a friendship is being able to participate in a reciprocal conversation. The goal of this intervention is to foster friendship building skills by monitoring reciprocal comments during show and tell time. A multiple baseline design was used to establish a baseline of the number of on-topic comments or questions emitted by a child when it was their turn to respond to the presenter. Later, the sentence strips were faded out to promote independent responses. Using a Self-Monitoring Checklist: Using the Self-Regulating model published in �Socially Savvy� by James T. Ellis, Ph.D., an intervention program was implemented to achieve goals related to this deficit. Our intervention process follows a multiple treatment design across environments. We implemented this intervention by creating a self-monitoring system to regulate their behavior across several common classroom environments.
Keyword(s): expanding sentences, reciprocal comments, self-monitoring, social skills
Expanding Sentences Systematically by Introducing Parts of Sentences Within a Social Group
TAMLA LEE (Temple University)
Abstract: The Therapy Center of Acadiana assists clients with autism in achieving goals associated with deficits related to social communication and social interaction. Relating to this, many clients IEP and assessments indicate deficits related to the ability to form descriptive or expansive sentences. Using the Common Core Standard associated with a norm-reference assessment for words per sentence measure, we designed a single case research model to increase the number of words in sentences. This model was administered repeatedly, twice a week, in a clinical setting during scheduled social times. After collecting a baseline from three sessions, the intervention was introduced. Our interventions followed a changing criterion assessment consisting of: adding adjectives to a sentence, using prepositional phrases, and developing compound sentences. An increased criterion was expected each time a new intervention was introduced. Each intervention was in place for two weeks, before introducing the next stage. After all interventions were completed, a maintenance assessment will occur after a two week latency period. The maintenance assessment will document number of words per sentence, along with what form of sentences expansion used by each client.
Increases in Reciprocal Conversation Behavior When Using a Sentence Strip Within Social Groups
WILLIAM MAULDIN (Therapy Center of Acadiana)
Abstract: A key part of forming a friendship is being able to participate in a reciprocal conversation with peers. Following the success of social groups for younger clients, the Therapy Center of Acadiana extended social groups to older, higher functioning clients. This social group, the Cubs is made of three clients between the ages of eight and ten. The goal of this group is to foster friendship building skills by monitoring reciprocal comments during show and tell time. A multiple baseline design was used to establish a baseline of the number of on-topic comments or questions emitted by a child when it was their turn to respond to the presenter. Clients received a + for every response that was on topic, and an - for a response off topic or no response. Once a baseline was established, the intervention consisted of providing sentence strip prompts for each client. Data was then collected the same way as baseline. Once experimental control is evident, the sentence strips will be faded out to promote independent responses.
Using a Self-Monitoring Checklist to Increase Self-Regulation and Social Language Within Social Groups
TAMLA LEE (Temple University)
Abstract: Typically, individuals with autism exhibit deficits related to social communication, social interactions, and the ability to monitor their own behavior during a given task. Using the Self-Regulating model published in Socially Savvy by James T. Ellis, Ph.D., BCBA-D and Christine Almeida, M.S.Ed., Ed.S., BCBA, an intervention program was implemented to achieve goals related to these deficits. These goals consisted of: aiding students in monitoring their behavior and increasing the frequency of targeted behaviors while decreasing the inappropriate behaviors emitted by the student. Our intervention process follows a multiple treatment design across environments. We implemented this intervention by creating a self-monitoring system to regulate their behavior across several common classroom environments such as bathroom breaks, activity stations set up in the gym (i.e. gym time), table instruction (i.e. table time), and group story time (i.e. rug time). Students are expected to monitor their talkativeness, ability to keep their hands to themselves, ability to sit quietly, and ability to follow directions in each of these environments. The children were rewarded based on a token system which will provide them the option to choose a prize based on the amount of tokens they received during each session. The goals of our research are to help the children get ready for the rules and regulations of mainstream kindergarten classrooms.
Producing Meaningful Improvements in Problem Behavior in Children With Autism: A Replication of Hanley's 2014 Study
William Mauldin (Therapy Center of Acadiana), BRANDON SCOTT ORSO (Therapy Center of Acadiana), Grayson Butcher (Therapy Center of Acadiana)
Abstract: The present study sought to systematically replicate the results of the Hanley et al. (2014) study. The original study applied and utilized the results of an individualized functional assessment procedure (see Hanley, 2012) to further the treatment (or replacement) of problematic behaviors in three individuals diagnosed with a developmental delay. This replication study implemented a treatment protocol congruent with that of the original study including a functional analysis, individual training sessions, and generalization training. However, alterations to the variables in order to promote generalization within the home, school, and simulated classroom setting within the therapy center occurred out of necessity and they are discussed within the presentation. In other words, this replication has systematically replicated the training of alternative, appropriate, functional communication responses as well as continual compliance and use of appropriate communication responses under various conditions requiring delay- and denial-tolerance. Results showed rapid reduction in problem behavior once the intervention was implemented.
 

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