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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Event Details

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Symposium #425
Recent Research in Applied Behavior Analysis and Dance Training
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Grand Suite 3, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Mallory J. Quinn (University of South Florida)
Abstract: Dance training historically focuses on training methods of a coercive nature which lack the use of behavioral coaching procedures with positive reinforcement (involving praise and specific feedback). This symposium covers three papers which provide the first behavioral data based observations of dance teacher training methods, as well as the development and testing of the application of three behavior analysis training methods (public posting, video modeling, and video modeling and video feedback), to novel populations within a dance studio context.
Keyword(s): dance, feedback
A Descriptive Analysis of Behavioral Dance Instructor Training Methods
MALLORY J. QUINN (University of South Florida), Lori Greenberg (University of South Florida), Raymond G. Miltenberger (University of South Florida), Taylor Narozanick (University of South Florida)
Abstract: This study identified antecedent behaviors and behavior specific consequences dance instructors use during competitive dance classes to train their students. Data was collected at over 12 studios within a 20-mile radius from the University of South Florida. Antecedent behaviors observed on behalf of instructors included instructions and modeling. Behavior specific consequences observed included: ignore, hands on correction, positive physical contact, specific and general verbal correction, specific and general praise, specific and general yelling, rehearsal, and coercive statements. Data was collected via a continuous recording method. All classes were scored continuously for the duration of the class (55 minutes). No experimental manipulations were conducted and the instructors did not receive feedback at any point during the study on results of the data collection. However, instructors were debriefed at the conclusion of the study that consisted of informing them which antecedent behaviors and behavior specific consequences were observed by data collectors including a summary of the results across all sites. Results informed us that dance instructors use high amounts of specific verbal corrections, general praise, and coercive statements during their classes. Very small amounts of specific praise were provided. The results did not differ greatly among studios of different locations in urban and rural settings or within the type of dance instructed. These results demonstrate that while dance instructors are well-versed at providing specific verbal correction, very rarely is specific feedback provided for specific correct elements of performance. Implications of these results and how they should direct future behavioral research will be discussed.
An Evaluation of Public Posting and Graphical Feedback to Enhance the Performance of Competitive Dancers
MALLORY J. QUINN (University of South Florida), Raymond G. Miltenberger (University of South Florida), Aracely Abreu (University of South Florida), Taylor Narozanick (University of South Florida)
Abstract: This study evaluated the use of public posting and feedback to enhance dance movements for adolescent dancers on a competition team. Four dancers, each performing two or three dance movements (a turn, kick, and/or leap) had their scores posted on a bulletin board at their studio. Dance movements were scored as a percentage correct by using a 14- to 16-step task analysis checklist. Intervention was evaluated in a multiple baseline across behaviors design. The students received graphical feedback on their performance from the previous weeks and saw the scoring sheet that reviewed the incorrect and correct aspects of their performance. This study found that public posting and feedback enhanced each of the dance movements for all participants. Implications and suggestions for future dance research will be discussed.
An Evaluation of the Use of Video Modeling and Video Modeling With Video Feedback to Enhance Dance Performance of Competitive Dancers
Mallory J. Quinn (University of South Florida), TAYLOR NAROZANICK (University of South Florida), Raymond G. Miltenberger (University of South Florida), Lori Greenberg (University of South Florida)
Abstract: This study evaluated the use of video modeling and video modeling and video feedback to increase the proficiency of dance movements for students on a competition team. Specifically, this study evaluated the effectiveness of video modeling and video modeling and video feedback in teaching dance skills to children in a competitive dance class on a ballet movement (a brise). Video modeling was used as an antecedent procedure where students were shown a video of a technically perfect execution of a dance movement and directed to salient elements of the move and then attempted the movement during the session. In video modeling and video feedback phases, video modeling was used as an antecedent procedure and video feedback as a consequence procedure the participant was shown her video side by side with the expert video. The student received specific verbal praise and specific verbal corrections for her performance as compared to the expert. For the participant who has not improved from either intervention, the perspective of the video will be altered and re-tested since dancers typically learn movements mirrored in the context of a dance classroom.
 

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