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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Event Details

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Symposium #399
CE Offered: BACB
Instruction-Based Interventions to Improve Students' Academic and Social Behaviors
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Regency Ballroom B, Hyatt Regency, Gold West
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kwang-Sun Blair, Ph.D.
Chair: Kwang-Sun Blair (University of South Florida)
Discussant: Andrew L. Samaha (University of South Florida)
Abstract: Instructional strategies that incorporate more opportunities for active student responding have been shown to increase student academic and social outcomes. Response cards and student response systems (e.g., clickers) are two effective and efficient ways for teachers to increase opportunities for active student responding. In this symposium, the study by Khan, Miltenberger, and Singer examined the effects of response cards on student disruptive behavior, percentage of questions answered, and accuracy of questions answered while alternating the number of teacher-directed questions across sessions. As a result of using response cards, the investigators found decreases in disruptive behaviors and increases academic behaviors. The second study by Horne and Blair examined the effects of an electronic student response system to improve student behaviors across two classrooms. Although limited, the results indicated that the classroom teachers implemented the electronic student response system with fidelity, and their implementation of the intervention resulted in reduced disruption and increased academic engagement. Social validity data indicated that both interventions were acceptable to teachers, effective, and most students enjoyed using the alternative method to respond to a teacher?s question. Victoria Fogel will serve as discussant and provide comments on each of the papers.
Keyword(s): Active Responding, Classroom Interventions, Clickers, Response Cards
Effects of Response Cards and the Number of Teacher-Directed Questions on Classroom Behaviors
NEELAM KHAN (University of South Florida), Raymond G. Miltenberger (University of South Florida), Leslie Singer (University of South Florida)
Abstract: Active student responding increases student academic outcomes and on-task behaviors. Response cards are an effective and efficient strategy for increasing active student responding. This study examined the effects of response cards on student disruptive behavior, percentage of questions answered, and accuracy of questions answered while alternating the number of teacher-directed questions across sessions. An alternating treatments design was used with five teacher-nominated students. During baseline (BL), the teacher used her standard lecture format, having students raise their hand when responding to a question. During the response card (RC) intervention, the teacher asked students to write responses on their white boards. Following BL, 3 conditions were rapidly alternated across sessions. Conditions included BL, RC in which the teacher asked 6 questions, and RC in which the teacher asked 12 questions. During the RC conditions, there was a decrease in disruptive behavior and an increase in the percentage and accuracy of responding.
An Evaluation of an Electronic Student Response System in Improving Class-Wide Behavior
Ashley Horne (University of South Florida), KWANG-SUN BLAIR (University of South Florida)
Abstract: A student response system is a technology that allows an entire classroom of students to respond to questions and receive immediate feedback from teachers during instruction. However, little research has examined the use of student response systems to support student behavior in elementary schools. This study focused on using an electronic student response system to improve class-wide behavior in two general elementary school classrooms. An ABAB and ABA reversal designs embedded within a multiple baseline design across classrooms was employed to evaluate the outcome of the intervention. Although limited, the results indicated that the classroom teachers implemented the electronic student response system with fidelity, and their implementation of the intervention resulted in reduced disruption and increased academic engagement. Social validity data indicated that the electronic response system intervention was acceptable to both teachers and students to some degree.
 

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