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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Event Details

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Paper Session #109
Sustained Attention and Response Inhibition in Children With Comorbid Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
Sunday, May 29, 2016
4:00 PM–4:20 PM
Roosevelt, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: AUT
Chair: Ambreen Shahabuddin (Easern Michigan University)
Sustained Attention and Response Inhibition in Children With Comorbid Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Domain: Basic Research
AMBREEN SHAHABUDDIN (Eastern Michigan University), James T. Todd (Eastern Michigan University), Renee Lajiness-O'Neill (University of Michigan ), catherine peterson (Eastern Michigan University )
Abstract: Difficulties attending have been frequently observed in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). While preliminary research suggests that co-occurring symptoms of ASD and ADHD are associated with greater delays in adaptive and cognitive functioning, little research has been devoted to examining attentional deficits in comorbidity. Four groups of 8- to 10-year-old children were administered the Conners Continuous Performance Test (CCPT-II): ASD only (n=16), ADHD only (n=16), comorbid ASD and ADHD (n=16), and a neurotypical group (NT; n=16). Children with comorbidity engaged in greatest behaviors of hyperactivity/impulsivity (M = 66.39, SD = 7.90), inattention (M = 64.18, SD = 9.20), and response time variability (RT; M = 61.67, SD = 8.86). No differences were found in comorbidity and ASD (p = .09) on commission errors, comorbidity and ADHD (p = .61) on omission errors, or comorbidity and ADHD (p = .24) on RT. The comorbid group was significantly different than ASD (p = .001), ADHD (p = .02), and controls (p < .001) on sustained attention. Parents and teachers reported similar behavior profiles in ADHD and comorbidity. Results indicate that comorbidity reflects both diagnoses with overall greater difficulties in attention. Suggestions for treatment and future research will be discussed.
 
 

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