Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Event Details

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Poster Session #497
Monday, May 27, 2019
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Exhibit Level, Riverside Exhibit Hall
Chair: Anita Li (Western Michigan University)
46.

Empirical Evaluation of Mobile Applications to Promote Walking in College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
SEO-I LEE (Yonsei University), Mincheol Jang (Yonsei University), Changseok Lee (Behavioral Psychology Laboratory in Yonsei University), Hee Won Kim (Yonsei University), Suhyon Ahn (Yonsei University)
Discussant: Anita Li (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Only few studies have assessed effectiveness of mobile applications for promiting walking behavior. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of three commonly used applications(Cashwalk, Fitmoney, Walker). 48 college students were recruited and randomly assigned to 3 application groups and one Control group. After collecting the baseline data for one week, participants in 3 application groups used the assigned application for 66 days. Results for repeated-measures ANOVA showed no significant differences in step counts across four groups. Additionally, bootstrapping was used to compare the confidence intervals of the mean of step counts for each individuals before and after using an application. The results showed that 30.77% of Cashwalk group, 9.09% of Fitmoney group, 14.29% of Walker group and 10% of Contorl group showed significant increase of their step counts on post test. These findings showed that 3 applications are not effective for facilitating walking behavior, suggesting the effectiveness of applications are limited.

 
47.

The Impact of a Self-Management Exercise Program With a Supplemental Mindfulness Intervention on Exercise Duration

Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
KATE ELIZABETH HARRISON (BCBA, Brett DiNovi & Associates), Mark Bradley (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
Discussant: Anita Li (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Regular exercise is proven to decrease a person's risk for disease and other physical health problems, as well as serious mental health issues including depression and anxiety. The United States Department of Health and Human Services suggests that adults get 150 minutes of moderate physical activity per week at minimum, and according to the Center for Disease Control only 23% of Americans are meeting this recommendation. While a commonly known barrier to regular exercise is a lack in self-management skills, poor body image as well as unclear values and focus may also limit an individual's willingness to engage in prolonged exercise. Self-management combined with reinforcement systems have proven to be successful in targeting healthy behaviors, including increasing physical activity. The research on the utility of mindfulness interventions (i.e., meditation) is growing, and shows that mindfulness training can increase executive attention across various tasks. There is little research to suggest whether proactive mindfulness interventions impact the duration of an individual's exercise. In this study, a multiple treatment reversal design is used to determine whether a supplemental pre-exercise mindfulness component to a self-management exercise program impacts the duration of exercise compared to self-management alone.

 
48.

Not Your Everyday Life Coach: Using Applied Behavior Analysis to Assist Individuals in Obtaining Personal and Professional Goals

Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
KRISTEN JENSEN (Mind Gym)
Discussant: Anita Li (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

I am a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) that focuses on providing behavior analytic services to first responders, couples, parents, animal owners, those who may need assistance with health and fitness, businesses...basically anyone! This is NOT talk therapy or psychotherapy. It’s a simple plan, with measurable goals and accountability. I teach the use of self management strategies (F-01) to meet an overall goal of identifying and making environmental changes (G-08) to best support you and your needs. During the initial assessment and interview, I will make recommendations regarding behaviors that must be established, maintained, increased or decreased (I-06) to reach your overall goal(s). ? Additionally, we program for maintenance (J-12) so learned behaviors are maintained. Our intervention strategies are based on client preferences (J-04), clients current repertoire (J-05), supporting environments (J-06) and best scientific evidence. I have always supported individuals with some sort of diagnosis and ALWAYS BELIEVED behavior modification could benefit ANYONE, not just those with a medical diagnosis! I have written hundreds of effective behavior modification/support plans and am passionate about working with people and teaching them the tools needed to realize their full potential. I do this by creating a step by step plan to help people, JUST LIKE YOU, reach their dreams...and it is what I DO BEST!

 
49. Effectiveness of Backward Chaining on Youth Softball Pitching Performance
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
SARAH M. DUNKEL-JACKSON (Seneca College)
Discussant: Anita Li (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: Engaging in behaviours associated with physical fitness is critical to the health of children and youth. Mendes (2014) reported that 84% of Canadian children play sports with softball being among the most financially accessible sports. Barrentine and colleagues (1998) noted that fastpitch softball pitching can lead to injury, especially in the upper extremities (e.g., elbow, shoulder). Furthermore, Powell and Barber-Foss (2000) suggest that girls are more susceptible to pitching injuries than boys. The application of positive behavioural principles such as reinforcement, chaining, shaping, prompting, and data collection can be successful in many applications, including sports. Because fastpitch softball pitching is a complex chain of several movements and behaviours, backward chaining may be an effective technique to increase the safe execution of this complex chain of behaviours. The current study examined the effectiveness of a softball clinic that incorporated backward chaining to teach safe softball pitching mechanics. During baseline, young female players performed a majority of pitching steps incorrectly. After gradually introducing drills that targeted the last steps in the pitching chain first, players’ performance increased during clinic pitching probes and later generalized to softball games.
 
50. Behavior Analysis and Tactical Urbanism: Analysis of a Pop-Up Protected Bike Lane
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
JENNIFER TRAPANI (University of Mississippi), Karen Kate Kellum (University of Mississippi)
Discussant: Anita Li (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: Tactical Urbanism involves low-cost, typically temporary, modifications to the built environment that attempt to improve common spaces. These strategies have received growing media attention in recent years; yet, data are rarely systematically collected to examine the effects of the modifications. A group of people interested in sustainability and active transportation in small college town sought to reduce vehicle speeds and improve safety of all users of a two-lane primary road with multiple intersections with the university. The group gained approval from the town council and the university administration to try various arrangements of temporary barriers for a protected bike lane and signage for crosswalks. The group undertook data collection, placed temporary 3-foot tall delineators along the existing bike lanes, and positioned pedestrian crossing signs in the middle of two crosswalks. University’s Active Transportation Advisory Committee funded the (total cost <$500). The project was evaluated with an ABCA design examining vehicle speed and social validity data. While the temporary barriers were in place, there was a substantial decrease in the 85th percentile speeds and an increase in perceived safety. Following the demonstration project, the town agreed to install more permanent signage and protected bike lanes.
 
52. Individual and Group Behavioral Skills Training to Teach College Students to Pour Standard Alcohol Servings
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Meagan Strickland (University of the Pacific), Margaret Brock (University of the Pacific), CAROLYNN S. KOHN (University of the Pacific)
Discussant: Anita Li (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: College students engage in high levels of excessive drinking; those who report less excessive drinking also report counting their drinks and setting drink limits. However, to successfully implement these strategies, students must be able to recognize and pour standard servings. Unfortunately, this is a skill most college students do not possess. Although individual behavioral skills training (BST) has been used to teach college students to accurately pour beer (Hankla et al., 2017), little is known about the effectiveness of BST when taught in a group setting, the setting most commonly used to teach college students accurate pouring. Using a multiple probe design, we evaluated the effects of BST on the accuracy of college students’ (N = 9) free-pours, into an 18 oz red plastic cup, of standard servings of (a) beer when taught in a group setting and (b) liquor when taught in an individual setting. Results indicate that following group BST, all participants provided accurate free-pours of beer, but fewer did so with the untrained generalization cup. Following individual BST, participants free-pours of liquor were variable and most required at least two BST sessions. Implications for college alcohol education policies will be discussed. Data collection will continue through February 2019.
 
53.

Using a Job Skills Training Program to Increase Longer Durations of Abstinence

Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
LYNSIE ANN BOELSCHE (University of South Florida; Jacksonville School for Autism)
Discussant: Ron Van Houten (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

A Therapeutic Workplace is a contingency based intervention designed to help individuals with drug addictions by providing them with the necessary skills to obtain an office job. Contingent on completing their work, Therapeutic Workplaces provide participants with vouchers that can later be exchanged for services and goods. This study would examine the extent to which a Therapeutic Workplace will affect the sustainability of abstinence for young adults with an addiction to opiates. Participants will be randomly assigned to Therapeutic Workplace (n=4) or Methadone Maintenance Treatment control group (n=4). This study will also compare base pay to productivity pay. In the productivity pay condition, participants will earn $12.00 per hour for attending the workplace and providing an opiate-free urine sample; they can also earn up to a $2.00 bonus based on performance. In the base-pay condition, participants will be paid $14.00 per hour for attending the workplace and providing an opiate-free drug sample. It is hypothesized that participants in the Therapeutic Workplace condition will achieve longer durations of abstinence than participants in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment condition. It is also hypothesized that participants will prefer the base pay condition over the productivity pay condition.

 
54. Community Violence Prevention Through Street Outreach and Mediation Services
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
DARYL ELLEN STEWART (University of Kansas), Jomella Watson-Thompson (University of Kansas), Erica Taylor (Kansas City, Missouri Health Department)
Discussant: Ron Van Houten (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: Violence is a preventable public health issue that results in loss of life, and has numerous costs for survivors, their families and society. According to the Kansas City, Missouri Police Department (2017), the homicide rate was 27.8 and the aggravated assault rate was 1,190.3 per 100,000 people. The Kansas City, Missouri Health Department’s Aim4Peace Violence Prevention Program focuses efforts in a geographical area with the highest rates of firearm homicides and aggravated assaults. With a mission to increase the capacity of the community to peacefully resolve conflicts, mediations are one core program component implemented by street intervention staff. Aim4Peace staff identify and interrupt conflicts that may escalate to violence, and mediate by interacting with individuals involved to resolve or de-escalate the situation and prevent a violent response. Using a community-based participatory approach, staff document descriptions of actions taken during mediations, the outcome, and contextual factors (e.g., reason for conflict, presence of a gun). The poster examines the mediated conflicts using a behavioral lens and discusses the relevance of cultural competence in service delivery. Additionally, methods for collaboration and overcoming barriers in working with communities with high rates of gun violence are presented.
 
55.

Rule Following and Children’s Selection of Healthy Foods

Area: CSS; Domain: Basic Research
JOSIANE MARIA DONADELI (São Carlos University), Julio C. De Rose (Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos), Douglas Donaris (Universidade Federal de São Carlos)
Discussant: Ron Van Houten (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Childhood obesity is a serious public health challenge (WHO, 2018). One of the factors that contribute to this problem is inadequate nutrition. In a previous study we showed that stating rules for food intake may decrease the amount of unhealthy food ingested by children (Donadeli & de Rose, 2018). The present work investigated how to maintain over time a low amount of unhealthy food ingested by children. Seven children participated. In each session, nine pieces of healthy and unhealthy foods were displayed. Children were given a rule stating that they could eat how many pieces of healthy food they wanted and only one piece of unhealthy food. Differential consequences were contingent on following or not following the rule. Consequences were presented initially in a continuous reinforcement schedule (CRF). Subsequently, they were presented in variable ratio schedule (VR3) and then they were withdrawn. The rule was effective for reducing unhealthy food intake for all children when it was present in both CRF and VR3. After withdrawal of consequences, reduced ingestion of unhealthy foods was maintained for five children. Results indicate that rules and differential consequences may reduce intake of unhealthy food and reduction may persist after gradual withdrawal of differential consequences.

 
56.

Behaving With Respect to Dogs: Teaching Children to Greet Dogs Safely

Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
RACHELLE L. YANKELEVITZ (Rollins College), April Michele Williams (Rollins College), Alexandra Knerr (Rollins College)
Discussant: Ron Van Houten (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Dog bites are a major health and welfare issue for both children and dogs. The child’s behavior around the dog can be a key precursor to a bite. Little research has assessed the effectiveness of educational interventions teaching children safe behaviors around dogs. Whether safe behavior generalizes from the training setting to the application setting depends on a match between the training and application contexts (Miltenberger, 2015). This match has been absent from much dog-safety training (Shen et al., 2017). The current project examines which of a series of training experiences result in children behaving safely around live dogs. Three children 4 years of age progressed through a series of TAGteach training sessions, alternating with assessment sessions including novel, live therapy dogs. The initial training sessions were in a classroom, and subsequent sessions were successively more like the everyday situation of meeting a leashed dog outdoors. Training to proficiency in the classroom setting did not result in children behaving safely in the everyday context. These results agree with previous behavioral research on safety skills training and suggest that educational interventions aimed at modifying children’s behavior around dogs should take place in the most naturalistic setting possible.

 
57. Applications of Matching-to-Sample Training for the Improvement of Waste-Management
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
JORGE A. RUIZ (Universidad Autonoma de Baja California), Karina Bermudez (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico)
Discussant: Ron Van Houten (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: School-implemented waste management programs are useful in helping to improve the environment and to reduce costs for waste generation. However, people involved in waste management do not always have adequate training to make a correct classification of waste. In the present study, a matching-to-sample training was carried out in a group of 15 students to improve their skills in waste management. The task consisted in 50 trials in which an example of one of five types of waste was presented as a sample stimulus and then participants chose one of five different colored containers corresponding to each of five different categories of waste type. Each election was followed by the “right” or “wrong” message. According to a pretest-posttest, the correct allocation of different types of waste to the corresponding deposit was assessed, and it was found that in all the students there was an increase in the percentage of correct assignations of waste to the corresponding containers. The relevance of the application of experimental procedures such as the matching-to-sample to improve the discrimination of the types of waste according to their characteristics and separate them correctly is discussed.
 
58. Review and Discussion of Research on Training Paraprofessionals in Special Education Classrooms
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
JAY LEUNG (University of Southern California), Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
Discussant: Ron Van Houten (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: It is common for children with autism in special education settings to be accompanied by paraprofessional teacher aides. Unfortunately, it is also common for teacher aides to receive little professional training in how to implement applied behavior analytic teaching techniques with the students they work with. This poster reviews research on training teacher aides and the effects that such training has on student outcomes. Studies suggest a lack of training is common and it follows that the caregivers’ competence to facilitate learning in students with autism. This paper discusses existing studies on the importance of the learning environment for the autism population and how it will likely benefit the population to provide enhanced training for teacher aides. Implications for training paraprofessionals in the school setting will be discussed and future directions will be recommended.
 
59. Bilingual Skill Acquisition Approaches within Applied Behavior Analysis: Review of Research and Future Directions
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
JACQUELINE RAMIREZ (University of Southern California; Positive Behavior Supports ), Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
Discussant: Ron Van Houten (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: Over half of the world’s children are raised in homes that speak more than one language. In the US, the percentage of the population that speaks more than one language is growing rapidly, and yet very few behavior analysts are available to provide ABA intervention bilingually. In addition, behavior analysts in the US often recommend bilingual families to restrict ABA intervention to English-only, especially in the early stages of intervention. Although this is a common recommendation amongst ABA providers, it may not be a recommendation that is based on research. This poster will examine existing research that has evaluated bilingual approaches to skill acquisition for children with developmental disorders. Research on bilingualism in the context of ABA skill acquisition is still in its infancy but initial studies have addressed a variety of topics, including mand acquisition, preference assessment, and child language preference during acquisition. Based on the research, suggestions for future research will be made, in addition to exploring potential preliminary practice recommendations.
 
60. What's a BCBA Anyway?
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
PAIGE BOYDSTON (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale ), Erica Jowett Hirst (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale)
Discussant: Ron Van Houten (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: The current study provides an analysis of results for two surveys designed to gather information regarding the general public’s perceptions and understanding of various job titles related to behavior analysis. Survey data were collected using Amazon Mechanical Turk. Information regarding pleasantness and clarity of job titles as well as common words associated with job titles were collected and analyzed.
 
 

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