Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Event Details

Previous Page

 

Symposium #483
CE Offered: BACB
Efficient and Resource-Saving Interventions in Middle Schools: Two Empirical Examples
Monday, May 27, 2019
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Fairmont, Second Level, Gold
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Sarah E. Pinkelman (Utah State University)
Discussant: M. Kathleen Kathleen Strickland-Cohen (Texas Christian University )
CE Instructor: Sarah E. Pinkelman, Ph.D.
Abstract: Middle school teachers struggle to effectively address the behavioral and academic needs of students with disabilities in their classrooms. Research in the fields of behavior analysis and special education provide a wealth of strategies that are likely to be effective with middle school students, however these strategies are often not feasible for teachers to implement in their classrooms. Teachers have limited resources (e.g., time, funding), and do not receive adequate training, coaching, and ongoing support to implement many of the interventions that have been documented as effective in the literature. As such, it is important that researchers identify efficient interventions that are reasonable for implementation in schools. This symposium will include two studies that examine the effects of contextually appropriate interventions, specifically activity schedules and interdependent group contingencies, in improving the behavior of middle school students with disabilities. Both studies used single subject research designs (multiple baseline across students with an embedded reversal and an ABAB) and demonstrate a functional relation between the intervention and student behavior. These strong treatment effects contribute to literature, provide directions for further research, and have important applied implications.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): classroom, middle school, problem behavior, special education
Target Audience: BCBAs working in schools. Faculty doing school-based research
 

Improving On-Task Behavior in Middle School Students With Disabilities: Modified Activity Schedules

STEPHANIE MATTSON (Utah State University), Sarah E. Pinkelman (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Middle school students receiving special education services under specific learning disability and other health impairment often struggle to remain on-task and meet independent work demands. Although a variety of strategies have been documented as effective in improving on-task behavior in students with disabilities, most are not contextually appropriate for public schools. Activity schedules may provide an efficient, minimally intrusive, and low-effort intervention for middle school classrooms. In this study, a concurrent multiple baseline design across participants with an embedded reversal was used to examine the effects of activity schedules on on-task and on-schedule behavior of four middle school students with disabilities in a resource classroom. Results demonstrate increased on-task and on-schedule behavior for all participants in math and language arts settings, and students and teachers both indicated that they enjoyed the activity schedule and that it improved on-task behavior and work completion. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

 
Effects of an Interdependent Group Contingency and Randomized Reinforcers in a Middle School Classroom
KRISTY PARK (George Mason University), Robert Olberding (Virginia Beach City Public Schools)
Abstract: Middle school students receiving special education services under specific learning disability and other health impairment often struggle to remain on-task and meet independent work demands. Although a variety of strategies have been documented as effective in improving on-task behavior in students with disabilities, most are not contextually appropriate for public schools. Activity schedules may provide an efficient, minimally intrusive, and low-effort intervention for middle school classrooms. In this study, a concurrent multiple baseline design across participants with an embedded reversal was used to examine the effects of activity schedules on on-task and on-schedule behavior of four middle school students with disabilities in a resource classroom. Results demonstrate increased on-task and on-schedule behavior for all participants in math and language arts settings, and students and teachers both indicated that they enjoyed the activity schedule and that it improved on-task behavior and work completion. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE