Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Event Details

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Poster Session #78
Saturday, May 25, 2019
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Exhibit Level, Riverside Exhibit Hall
Chair: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
75.

The Effects of Behavior Skills Training on a Mother's Implementation of Constant Time Delay for Her Children With Autism and Developmental Delay

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
YU LING CHEN (The Ohio State University)
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract:

Many children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or Developmental Delay (DD) have difficulty with communication. Caregivers, such as parents, often spend a great deal of effort understanding their children and helping them to communicate. Behavior Skills Training (BST) is a didactic instruction procedure that includes the following steps: instructions, modeling, role-play, and feedback. Research has shown that BST is an effective method for training caregivers such as parents, teachers, and paraprofessionals. This study examined the effects of BST on parent implementation of a constant time delay (CTD) procedure for her three children (ages 2-6) with autism or developmental delay. The experimenter trained the mother to use CTD to teach her children to tact pictures. The mother of the three participants was diagnosed with an intellectual disability (ID). Results of the study suggest BST was effective for training the parent to implement the BST steps correctly and was effective for improving each child’s tacting skills.

 
77.

Review of the Research on Training Methods and Skill Acquisition for Pre-Service Behavior Analysts

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
REGAN WESTON (Baylor University), Tonya Nichole Davis (Baylor University), Supriya Radhakrishnan (Baylor University)
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract:

There is limited research evaluating strategies being used to train pre-service behavior analysts. A review of the literature was conducted to identify studies that examine the effects of teaching strategies on pre-service behavior analysts acquisition of behavior analytic skills. Studies were included if participants were graduate students training to become behavior analysts, the dependent variable was a behavior analytic skill, a single-case research design was used, and individual participant data was reported. A systematic search identified seven studies that met the aforementioned inclusion criteria. The purposes of this review were to: 1) identify and summarize literature on training pre-service behavior analysts, (2) evaluate the quality of existing literature by applying the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) single-case research design standards to the included studies, and (3) obtain an effect size of the strategies that met the WWC single-case research design standards. Results of the included analyses are summarized and implications for future research are discussed.

 
78.

Pivotal Applied Behavior Analysis Experiences: How Behavior Analysts Find the Field and Pursue Their BCBA

Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
JUSTIN N COY (University of Pittsburgh), Douglas E. Kostewicz (University of Pittsburgh)
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract:

Recently, applied behavior analysis (ABA) has seen dramatic increases in university training programs, experimental and applied research studies, and certified practitioners (Burning Glass, 2015; Carr & Nosik, 2017; Deochand & Fuqua, 2016), mirroring increasing nation-wide demand for credentialed behavior analysts (BACB, 2018). However, little research focuses on understanding our professional workforce, including their introductions to the discipline. Behavior analysts across Pennsylvania (n = 98) completed an in-depth quantitative and qualitative survey. Several researchers conducted both the analysis and coding, and measures were taken to ensure sufficient accuracy. Questions focused on a variety of issues/experiences, including their own pivotal experiences with ABA and motivating factors for becoming a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). Results highlight that behavior analysts are introduced to the field through working with clients, professional trainings, and during undergraduate or graduate coursework. After learning about the field, the respondents described career opportunities, a desire to gain both knowledge and skills, a connection with the science and practical applications of ABA, and enjoyment of the work and clients as key in pursing their BCBA. The results from study provide important preliminary information about our workforce and the professional and personal experiences which brought them to the field.

 
79.

Training Program and Supervision Quality: Experiences and Perspectives of Current Behavior Analysts

Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
JUSTIN N COY (University of Pittsburgh), Douglas E. Kostewicz (University of Pittsburgh)
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract:

Recent empirical research and special issues have focused on determining appropriate training program ranking metrics, including faculty productivity and pass rates. Arguably, an important way to judge the quality of a training program is by talking with its graduates. Field leaders have recognized the critical importance of student voice in understanding program quality (Iwata, 2015). However, to date no research has focused on understanding the program or supervision experiences of our behavior professionals. A mixed-methods survey was send to over 1,200 behavior analysts across Pennsylvania to understand a variety of professional issues, including questions about their program selection considerations, and strengths and needs of their training program. The respondents (n = 98) also described the type(s), strengths, and needs of their supervision experiences and supervisors. Results from this survey are still being analyzed; however, preliminary findings suggest that future behavior analysts select their training program based on location/convenience, program reputation, and specific program characteristics (e.g., able to work while completing the program). Results from this survey will add an important missing voice into our fields’ conversations regarding training program quality and can provide critically important information for those responsible for training the next generation of behavior analysts.

 
80. Training Vocabulary Using Equivalence in a College Learning Course
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
KELLY HUGO (Santa Clara University), Matthew C. Bell (Santa Clara University)
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract: Equivalence based instruction, derived from basic stimulus equivalence research, appears well suited to train vocabulary in college classrooms. Much of the equivalence based instruction research has employed brief training periods and immediate testing. The present study used equivalence based instruction to train a subset of vocabulary across a 10-week term of an upper-division undergraduate course in learning using a learning management system. Regular assessment of vocabulary was one course component that included pretest, equivalence based instruction, posttest quizzes for each textbook chapter. In training, students learned both term-to-example and definition-to-example relationships. Once students reached an 87% accuracy in training, the posttest presented all six equivalent and emerging relationships. Analysis of data using a 2 (chapter 2 vs. 3) x 2 (experimental vs. control) within-subjects ANOVA showed no significant main effect of chapter, F(1, 15) = .011, p = .919, a main effect of experimental vs. control, F(1,15) = 17.76, p = .001, partial eta = .542, and no interaction, F (1,15) = 2.186, p = .16, with significantly lower performance for the experimental terms (M = 0.92, SD = 0.08) than control (M = 0.96, SD = 0.07) terms. Thus, preliminary results suggest that equivalence based instruction did not produce a learning benefit for vocabulary.
 
81.

A Behavioral Analytic Competency-Based Training for Wraparound Professionals

Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
MARLENA BRANDSTEIN (Aveanna Health Care), BRIANNA COFFIN (Aveanna Healthcare), Melissa Fenske (Aveanna Healthcare), Adriana Gonzalez-Lopez (Aveanna Health Services), Juan Carlos Lopez (Aveanna Health Care)
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract:

Wraparound professionals are typically masters-level service providers who work with individuals with autism in home and community settings. However, as this study shows, some may lack the necessary skills to do so using applied behavioral analytic (ABA) strategies. This study discusses a competency-based training designed to bridge this gap. At the present time, eight participants have received training on how to define behavior, write behavioral goals, and collect and analyze behavioral data visually. Twenty more professionals are projected to complete the training by the end of the project. Preliminary results show that prior to training on average most participants score at 34% competency level. Currently, after fully training two participants, the average competency level increases to 84%. Likewise, participants and administrators report greater satisfaction with this approach as compared to traditional training.

 
82. Correspondence Between a Concurrent-Operants Demand Assessment and a Progressive-Ratio Schedule
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
SARAH MALAGODI (New England Center for Children ), Jason C. Bourret (New England Center for Children), Lindsay Lloveras (New England Center for Children, University of Florida )
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract: We applied methods typically used in measuring the effects of consequences in quantifying the effort of tasks in individuals diagnosed with autism. Preference assessments are used to identify items that potentially function as reinforcers in educational and clinical settings. Some experimenters have used the progressive-ratio (PR) schedule to measure relative reinforcing efficacy at progressively increasing response requirements. In basic research, effort has typically been conceptualized as the physical force required to complete a response. Although physical force is an easily manipulated variable in laboratory settings, the relative effort of common tasks proves more difficult to measure. Accurately quantifying the effort required to complete a task may have important clinical implications such as informing selection of lower-effort alternatives to problem behavior in DRA. In the present study, we compared PR breakpoints across a variety of tasks that differ across response dimensions in an attempt to evaluate a singular measure of response effort. Participants were four students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder that were attending a school for individuals with intellectual disability. We found there to be correspondence between the PR and the CODA for one out of four participants.
 
83.

Application of Self-Management Strategies to Improve Student Wellbeing and Enhance Learning

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
JULIE M. SLOWIAK (University of Minnesota Duluth; InJewel LLC)
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract:

Students in an undergraduate applied behavior analysis (ABA) course were asked to develop and implement a behavioral self-management program in which they pinpointed a single target behavior within one of six dimensions of wellbeing. Students were provided with instruction on ABA principles and strategies and received guidance from the course instructor while crafting action plans for their behavior change projects. The purpose of this project was to enhance students' learning experience while learning the basic principles of behavior analysis. Students were asked to apply ABA principles in order to demonstrate their ability to effectively use self-management strategies to change their own behavior, as well as evaluate the effectiveness of their behavior change strategies. This poster will illustrate the step-by-step process through which the course instructor guided students, share data-based results from individual student projects, as well as share a summary of students' reflections on their experiences and students' perceptions of their ability to use what they learned in the course in future behavior change applications.

 
84.

Further Evaluation of Teaching Behavior Technicians to Input Data and Graph Using GraphPad Prism

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
SARAH ELIZABETH MARTINEZ ROWE (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Daniel R. Mitteer (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Brian D. Greer (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Kayla Rechelle Randall (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Adam M. Briggs (Eastern Michigan University)
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract:

We extended Mitteer, Greer, Fisher, and Cohrs (2018) by examining the effects of a video model on inputting data into GraphPad Prism, which is a necessary skill for graph construction. We also replicated Mitteer et al. by examining the effects of a graphing video model with each participant following acquisition of data input. We used a concurrent multiple-baseline-across-skills design with two behavior technicians to assess input and graphing skills separately prior to and during access to relevant video models. We evaluated the generality of the training procedures by assessing both skills during input-plus-graphing sessions without access to the video models. The video models resulted in mastery of input and graphing skills when assessed individually. We observed training effects generalize to input-plus-graphing sessions once behavior technicians experienced all relevant video models. These results suggest that individuals should view both input and graphing video models prior to depicting single-case design data in Prism but that these skills can maintain at high levels of accuracy without continued access to the training materials.

 
85.

The Analysis of the Psychological Dimension in a Teaching-Learning Situation

Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
AGUSTIN DANIEL GOMEZ FUENTES (Universidad Veracruzana), Minerva Perez Juarez (University of Veracruz, Mexico), Enrique Zepeta Garcia Garcia (Universidad Veracruzana), Esmeralda Corona (Universidad Veracruzana)
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract:

In this research the psychological aspects that participate in a teaching-learning situation are analyzed and discussed. That is, the modes of language, as a medium of conventional contact and the abilities, aptitudes and competencies. The functional contact emphasizes the psychological phenomenon, as an activity defined from an individual and at least one object or another individual; the individual is not separable, as part of the relationship of the other entities. The term contact, as a logical category, specifies the means that makes the functional relationship possible. Sixteen children of both sexes of the fifth grade with and without special education requirements from a public elementary school participated in the study analyzed. An intrasubject design was used with a diagnostic test, initial test, intervention phase and a final test. The analysis of the psychological dimension in a teaching-learning situation can be an alternative to transfer from a traditional conception that emphasizes the products and results, to another centered on interdependent relationships in which the complementary modes of language (speaking-listening, reading-writing, observing-pointing/gesturing), are integrated as multimodal episodes and make possible the interaction between people, actions, objects and events pertinent to the situation.

 
86.

Gamification in Experimental Behavior Analysis: Teaching Experimental Method With Portal 2 ®

Area: TBA; Domain: Basic Research
ROBERTO SOARES PESSOA NETO (Universidade Federal do Ceará, UFC), Carolina Pedroza Barros (Universidade Federal do Ceará, UFC), Daniely Ildegardes Brito Tatmatsu (Universidade Federal do Ceará, UFC)
Discussant: Bryan J. Blair (Long Island University)
Abstract:

This research aims to find a suitable replacement for rats in experimental behavior analysis discipline on undergraduate courses. To achieve this objective the game Portal 2 ® test chamber creation tool has been utilized on naive psychology students as a way to teach them basic behavior analysis concepts, such as modeling, all the participants had to solve a questionnaire before and after the experiment as well as attend to theoretical classes, then they were divided into two groups one of them had practical modeling and extinction classes with a Portal 2 ® test chamber created by the authors and the other had a standard approach with Wistar rats and Skinner boxes. The results showed that both groups had similar results on their post-test which may classify Portal 2 ® test chambers as a suitable alternative to traditional teaching on experimental behavior analysis.

 
 

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