Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Event Details

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Symposium #187
CE Offered: BACB
Training Staff in Function-Based Interventions, Token Economies, and Applied Verbal Behavior
Sunday, May 26, 2019
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Fairmont, Third Level, Crystal
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
CE Instructor: Sharon A. Reeve, Ph.D.
Abstract: As the field of applied behavior analysis continues to grow, it is necessary for behavior analysts to train more direct care providers. It is therefore important to identify training modalities that are effective and acceptable to staff trainees. Three papers on training staff in a variety of teaching procedures will be presented in this symposium. The first paper trained teachers to identify the correct function of behavior via analysis of descriptive data, to select the appropriate procedural variation of functional communication training (FCT) based on this function, and to implement FCT accurately in role play. The second study used a non-concurrent multiple-baseline design across participants to evaluate the effectiveness of manualized instruction to increase staff trainee’s accurate implementation of a token economy. The last study used a non-concurrent multiple-probe design across classroom cohorts to evaluate a performance and competency-based training model to teach teachers and teaching assistants to apply an applied verbal behavior approach at a private school serving individuals with autism spectrum disorder.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Students and Practitioners
Learning Objectives: Participants will define staff training Participants will describe manualized instruction Participants will describe a staff training procedure to identify functions of behavior
 
Training Special Education Teachers to Select and Implement Appropriate Function-Based Interventions for Problem Behavior
VICTORIA FLETCHER (University of Houston – Clear Lake ), Dorothea C. Lerman (University of Houston-Clear Lake), Kally M Luck (University of Houston - Clear Lake), Sarah Williams (University of Houston – Clear Lake )
Abstract: Training teachers to select and implement appropriate function-based interventions in their classrooms may reduce their reliance on behavior specialists and other consultants to help manage their students’ problem behavior. Past research evaluated the outcomes of this type of training primarily through verbal report. We extended this research by training teachers to identify the correct function of behavior via analysis of descriptive data, to select the appropriate procedural variation of functional communication training (FCT) based on this function, and to implement FCT accurately in role play. Five special education teachers participated. Prior to training, the teachers did not correctly identify the function of problem behavior based on previously collected descriptive data, and they often reinforced problem behavior during role play with a simulated student. Following training, all of the participants identified the function of the behavior and implemented the correct procedural variation of FCT. This research highlights the importance of training teachers to identify function and implement interventions based on the function.
 
Evaluation of an Instructional Manual to Train Staff to Implement a Token Economy
JENNIFER GUTIERREZ (Caldwell University), Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University), Jason C. Vladescu (Caldwell University), Ruth DeBar (Caldwell University), Antonia R. Giannakakos (Manhattanville College)
Abstract: An instructional manual is a feasible way to train staff because it allows the staff trainee to refer to information previously read, highlight important information, and it is portable. Reinforcement in the form of a token economy is commonly used when teaching individuals with developmental disabilities. Therefore, it is important to find effective modalities to train staff on implementing token economies. Thus, this study evaluated an instructional manual to train inexperienced staff to implement a token economy with a confederate. A non-concurrent multiple-baseline design across participants was used to evaluate the effectiveness of an instructional manual to increase the staff trainee’s accurate implementation of a token economy. Following the use of the instructional manual, staff trainees accurate implementation of a token economy and data collection on confederate responding increased to mastery, the skills generalized from a confederate to a child with autism, and the skills maintained one month following training. The results of this study support and extend previous research that used written instructions to successfully train inexperienced staff. Interobserver agreement, treatment integrity and interobserver agreement on treatment integrity were collected on at least 33% of all trials across all phases of the study and were at 100%.
 
Establishing an Applied Verbal Behavior Approach in Schools Using Performance and Competency-Based Training
SARAH FRAMPTON (May Institute, Inc. ), M. Alice Shillingsburg (May Institute), Brittany Ann Juban (May Institute), Meghan Silva (May Institute), Sarah Weddle (May Institute ), Kayla Gordon (May Institute ), Melinda Galbato (The May Institute)
Abstract: Over several decades, a modified approach to early intensive behavior intervention based on the core principles of behavior analysis and Skinner’s (1957) analysis of verbal behavior has been developed by clinicians and researchers. This approach, referred to here as applied verbal behavior (AVB), includes the core components of: a) analysis of language according to Skinner’s taxonomy of verbal behavior, b) emphasis on initial mand training, c) fast-paced, varied instruction, d) pairing with reinforcement, e) errorless instruction, and f) discontinuous data collection. We implemented a performance and competency-based training (DiGennaro Reed, & Henley, 2015) model to teach teachers and teaching assistants to apply an AVB approach at a private school serving individuals with ASD. The training package consisted of: a) didactic instruction, b) modeling, c) video examples, d) practice with feedback, and e) competency-based testing. Treatment was introduced in a non-concurrent multiple probe design across classroom cohorts; reliability data were collected during baseline and post-training sessions. Results showed that teachers and teacher’s assistants could be taught to apply AVB with integrity. Results also offer preliminary indications that an AVB approach may be efficacious for some students with ASD at increasing the frequency of mands and decreasing interfering behaviors.
 

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