Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Event Details

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Poster Session #498
Monday, May 27, 2019
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Exhibit Level, Riverside Exhibit Hall
Chair: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
61.

Integrating Behavior Analysis and Data Analytics to Target Interventions Toward Safety Outcomes

Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
MATTHEW M LASKE (Appalachian State University), Maira Compagnone (Appalachian State University), Timothy D. Ludwig (Appalachian State University), Shawn Bergman (Appalachian State University), Angela R. Lebbon (Eastman Chemical Company)
Discussant: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Abstract:

In 2016, there were approximately 2.9 million injuries and 5,190 workplace fatalities in the U.S. private sector (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2017). The business use of data analytics is growing (Davenport, Harris, & Morison, 2010) and is beginning to be applied to injury prevention (Wagner, 2014) for the detection of behavioral precursors associated with injuries and other safety outcomes. Data analytics in conjunction with behavioral safety observations (Cooper, 2006) and other data sources are used in this study to create a descriptive model to guide the behavior analyst in pinpointing, informed intervention design, and program evaluation through this multiyear study. This study identifies behavioral covariates of leading and lagging safety variables within databases from four divisions of a Fortune 500 chemical manufacturer, each with different manifestations of behavioral safety. Results relating specific at-risk behavioral trends with behaviors associated with safety management system participation and operational tasks (e.g., overtime work) as they relate to meaningful safety outcome (e.g., injury) data will be presented.

 
62.

Ranking of the Most Prolific Authors and Institutions in Journal of Organizational Behavior Management

Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
ANDRESSA SLEIMAN (Univeristy of Florida ), Nicole Gravina (University of Florida), Nicholas Matey (University of Florida )
Discussant: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Abstract:

The Journal of Organizational Behavior Management (JOBM) is the flagship journal for the growing field of Organizational Behavior Management (OBM). A number of researchers have contributed to the knowledge base in the field across the past forty years. The purpose of the current article was to identify the most prolific authors in JOBM. Articles that were either editorials or book reviews were excluded from the study. A total of 638 peer-reviewed studies published in JOBM were coded. The top 10 most prolific authors in JOBM were identified by decade and overall. The top 10 institutions were identified across all years. Additionally, representation by women was evaluated over time.

 
63.

The Effect of Behavioral Based Safety Coaching for Manager on Safety Performance in Sawmilling Site

Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
KWANGSU MOON (Chung-Ang University)
Discussant: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Abstract:

This study examined the effect of BBS coaching program on workers’ safety behaviors in three sawmilling site. One or two managers and about twelve workers at each site participated in this study. BBS coaching for manager consisted of safety leadership education, safety observation and feedback on workers’ safety behavior, low-cost reward for safety observation. Dependent variables were the percentage of workers’ safe behaviors. Critical behavior checklist developed for measuring safety behaviors trough Sulzer-Azaroff and Fellner (1984)’s process. A nonconcurrent AB multiple baseline design across settings was adopted. After baseline (A), BBS coaching program (B) was introduced to each site. The results showed that BBS coaching was effective to increase workers’ safety behaviors. These results suggest that BBS coaching would be an alternative treatment technique to improve safety management of small sawmilling site.

 
64. A Comparison of the Effects of Two Different Types of Gateway on the Reduction of Speeding Behavior at a Pedestrian Crossing
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
SUNG JUN LIM (Chung-ang University), kangcholong kim (Chung ang university), Kyunghwa Park (Chung Ang University), Shezeen Oah (Chung Ang University)
Discussant: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Abstract: This study compared the effects of two different types of gateways (i.e., single vs. multiple) on the reduction of speeding behavior at a pedestrian crossing in a school zone. The single gateway consisted of a single pair of traffic posts installed at the pedestrian crossing. The multiple gateway consisted of ten pairs of traffic posts, each pair 1.5 m apart from one another, installed along the street starting from the pedestrian crossing. The speeds of vehicles passing through the pedestrian crossing were measured using speed guns. The data were collected for two hours every weekday for 21 weeks. An ABABACBC design was adopted, in which the single gateway conditions were implemented in B phases and the multiple gateway conditions were implemented in C phases. The results indicated that both types of gateway were effective, but the multiple gateway conditions were more effective than the single gateway conditions in reducing speeding behavior.
 
65.

Effects of Accurate and Inaccurate Feedback on Work Performance Under Two Different Work Conditions

Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Jidong Lee (Chung Ang University), MINJEE HONG (Chung-Ang University), Sung Jun Lim (Chung-Ang University), Shezeen Oah (Chung Ang University)
Discussant: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Abstract:

This study compared the effects of accurate (i.e., contingent) and inaccurate (i.e., non-contingent) feedback on work performance under two different work conditions. One hundred twenty participants were randomly assigned to the four experimental conditions and asked to perform a simulated work task. Under one work condition, participants could clearly see the outcome of their performance (i.e., conspicuous condition). Under the other condition, they could not clearly see the outcome of their performance (i.e., inconspicuous condition). The results indicated that accurate feedback was more effective than inaccurate feedback under the conspicuous condition, but the two types of feedback produced comparable effects under the inconspicuous condition.

 
66. An Examination of the Effectiveness of Automated Vibration Feedback System on Safe Sitting Postures
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Ji yeon Ahn (Chung Ang University), JIHAN CHOI (Chung Ang University), Yeon Seo (Chung Ang University), Shezeen Oah (Chung Ang University)
Discussant: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Abstract: This study examined the effectiveness of an automated vibration feedback system in improving safe sitting postures. Participants were four office workers. The dependent variable was the percentages of time participants spent in safe sitting postures. The feedback system consisted of providing participants with vibration to their thighs either (1) when they engaged in safe sitting posture (i.e., positive procedure) or (2) when they engaged in unsafe sitting posture (i.e., negative procedure). A counterbalanced multiple-baseline design across participants was adopted. For two participants, the positive procedure was introduced after the baseline, and the negative procedure was introduced in the next phase. For the other two participants, the sequence of positive and negative procedure was reversed. Results indicated that both types of feedback were effective in increasing safe sitting posture, and the effects of the two types of feedback were comparable.
 
67. Effects of Computer-Based Behavioral Skills Training on the Implementation of the Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program (VB-MAPP)
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
IAN E. MCELFISH (Western Michigan University), Rebecca Kolb (Western Michigan University), Stephanie M. Peterson (Western Michigan University)
Discussant: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Abstract: One of the most commonly used measurement protocols for the language and skills of individuals with developmental differences (disabilities) such as autism spectrum disorder is known as the Verbal Behavior – Milestones Assessment and Placement Program (VB-MAPP) (Sundberg, 2008). Challenges faced by practitioners who supervise staff responsible for using this protocol include, but aren’t limited to, the amount of time needed to train staff to mastery and the effectiveness of training initiatives. In response to these challenges, researchers have investigated various training packages and methodologies (Molony, 2009; Barnes et al., 2014; Geiger et al. 2018). One particularly effective means of training staff is known as Behavioral Skills Training (BST). In recent years, with advancements in technology, practitioners have begun to adopt computerized training initiatives, often referred to as computer-based instruction (CBI), in order to mitigate the time constraints associated with training individuals in the administration of assessments such as the VB-MAPP. These technologies have afforded clinicians and researchers alike the opportunity to have trainees complete training on their own, in effect, freeing up time for the supervisor and allowing for them to spend more time on other important clinical tasks. The present study investigated the effectiveness of computer-based behavioral skills training (CBST) to teach practitioners to administer the level 1 Mand assessment protocol of the VB-MAPP. Of particular interest, were the effects of BST on the practitioners’ ability to demonstrate skill sets believed to be requisite for effectively evaluating a client/student’s language repertoire, as well as whether (or not) these skill sets would generalize to the practitioners’ assessment of other skills domains of their client/student(s).
 
68. Prompting and Decreasing Response Effort to Improve Employee Preparedness in a Human Services Organization
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
MARY LOUISE LEWIS (Florida Institute of Technology), Ashley Felde (Florida Institute of Technology), Katherine Haggerty (Florida Institute of Technology), Nicole Gravina (University of Florida), Andressa Sleiman (Univeristy of Florida )
Discussant: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Abstract: Prior literature in Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) has shown prompting procedures to be an effective antecedent manipulation used to increase a target behavior. This study used an email prompt to increase employee preparedness for a social skills program at a human services organization. Specifically, we decreased the response effort required to locate the lesson plan, which was included in the email. We used an alternating treatment design in which the antecedent manipulation was either implemented or withdrawn. We measured employee readiness using an anonymous self-report survey and assessed five variables. Our results showed that the email prompt increased employees’ overall preparedness.
 
69.

Statistical Analysis for Changing Criterion Designs With One or More Reversal Phases

Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
STEVIE ANN COLLINI (Western Michigan University), Bradley E. Huitema (Western Michigan University)
Discussant: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Abstract:

Statistical analyses for single-case studies have been proposed for common reversal, multiple-baseline, and changing criterion designs (e.g., Collini and Huitema, 2018; Huitema, 2011, 2018). It is not unusual, however, to encounter embellished versions of the most common designs as well as less frequently applied designs; existing analyses do not apply to these designs. The motivation for the embellishments is usually to increase the internal validity of the experiment. The changing criterion design, for example, can be easily modified to strengthen the evidence for an intervention effect by incorporating one or more reversal phases. This is a good idea if the study is not likely to be harmed by introducing a temporary change of conditions to those that had been in place during an earlier phase of the study. The method proposed in this presentation applies to changing criterion designs that include at least one reversal phase. The statistical analysis provides (1) overall measures of behavior change related to criterion changes, (2) individual measures of change associated with each phase change, and (3) measures of the effect of the reversal conditions. Statistical inference (i.e., hypothesis tests and confidence intervals) are described for each of these three types of descriptive measure.

 
70. Will Work for Phone: A Reinforcer Assessment of Smartphone Access in College Students
Area: OBM; Domain: Basic Research
ALEXANDRA KNERR (Rollins College), Stephanie L. Kincaid (Rollins College), Rachelle L. Yankelevitz (Rollins College)
Discussant: Carl V. Binder (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Abstract: Smartphones are ubiquitous in our society, yet little research has been done to assess the reinforcing value of smartphone access. In this study, four college undergraduate students completed a video transcription task to earn access to their smartphones. A progressive-ratio (PR) schedule was used in which the required number of transcribed words approximately doubled following each 2-min period of smartphone access (i.e., actual ratio requirements slightly varied from strict doubling to round to the nearest 5 s in the video). When analyzed as average words per minute for each ratio, three of the subjects did not exhibit ratio strain within the 1.5 h session. Subject 2 failed to meet the required word count in two of the ratio runs, made protest statements, and chose not to continue with the appointment. This study indicates that access to a personal smartphone can be a powerful reinforcer adds to the literature on reinforcers for typically developing adults.
 
 

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