Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Event Details

Previous Page

 

Symposium #238
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Technological Advances in Staff Training
Sunday, May 26, 2019
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency West, Ballroom Level, Toronto
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Discussant: Nicole Gravina (University of Florida)
CE Instructor: Regina A. Carroll, Ph.D.
Abstract: The current symposium investigates evidence-based methodologies for staff training, including the use of verbal and textual prompts, behavioral observations, and video modeling. First, Landon Cowan will present a study investigating the effects of textual and verbal prompts on teaching graduate-level therapists to evaluate their own clinical skills, and to determine the influence of self-evaluation on clinical performance. Second, Kathleen Marano will present a study assessing the effects of conducting behavioral observations and ratings on staff implementation of a paired-stimulus preference assessment. Third, Abigail Blackman will present a series of studies examining the influence of the observer effect on participants’ integrity with implementing the guided-compliance procedure. Fourth, Amber Paden will present a study evaluating the use of video modeling with voiceover instructions to teach supervisors to provide performance feedback to therapists implementing the guided-compliance procedure. Finally, Nicole Gravina will discuss interesting components of each study, and describe future areas of research on staff training.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavioral Observations, Feedback, Observer effect, Staff Training
Target Audience: The target audience is professionals and researchers in behavior analysis
Learning Objectives: NA
 
The Effects of Textual and Verbal Prompts on the Self-Evaluation Skills and Clinical Performance of Graduate-Level Therapists
LANDON COWAN (University of Houston- Clear Lake), Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Abstract: In the past few years, there has been a 400% increase in the number of individuals obtaining Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA™) credentials in the United States (Dockhand & Fuqua, 2016). Previous research has suggested that there is a deficit of empirical research on the training and supervision of individuals seeking their BCBA™ and BCaBA™ credentials (LeBlanc & Luiselli, 2016; Reed & Henley, 2015; Sellers, Valentino, & LeBlanc, 2016). Organizational behavior management (OBM) research studies suggest that task clarification, performance feedback, and self-monitoring are effective in training employees and increasing workplace performance (Dargin, Mahoney, Cox, Sweetens, & Poling, 2014; Olson & Winchester, 2008). A multiple baseline across participants design is employed to investigate the effects of textual and verbal prompts on teaching graduate-level therapists to evaluate their own clinical skills, and to determine the influence of self-evaluation on clinical performance. A self-evaluation data collection sheet is used to teach therapists to evaluate their own clinical performance. Therapists are asked to write replacement behaviors for those skills that they did not perform correctly. Incorrect evaluations resulted in watching a video of their clinical session and using the self-evaluation sheet to record their performance. Thus far, results with two participants indicate that the textual prompt procedure is effective in increase self-evaluation of clinical skills. Additionally, there was an increase in clinical performance for both participants. Data will be collected with 1-2 additional participants.
 
Effect of Conducting Behavioral Observations and Ratings on Staff Implementation of a Paired-Stimulus Preference Assessment
KATHLEEN EMILY MARANO (Caldwell University), Jason C. Vladescu (Caldwell University), Kenneth F. Reeve (Caldwell University), Florence D. DiGennaro Reed (University of Kansas)
Abstract: Research is needed to find an efficient staff training method that requires little direct training by a qualified professional. One such technique is the observation and rating of others’ behavior. This technique may result in individuals learning to perform the behavior themselves, a result called observer effects. No studies have assessed observer effects and stimulus preference assessment implementation. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of conducting behavioral observations and ratings on staff implementation of a paired-stimulus preference assessment. Staff trainees scored videos of implementation of steps and conducted the assessment with a simulated consumer. Results showed the procedure was effective and efficient. Probes conducted with an actual consumer and with novel items showed extension of skills. These results extend the literature on observer effects by showing this procedure’s usefulness in applied settings.
 
The Impact of Variations in Training on the Observer Effect
ABIGAIL BLACKMAN (University of Kansas), Matthew Novak (University of Kansas), Tyler Erath (University of Kansas), Ryan Gallagher (University of Kansas), Florence D. DiGennaro Reed (University of Kansas)
Abstract: A limitation of behavioral skills training is that it is resource intensive, which may be a barrier to its adoption in applied settings. Recent research provides emerging support for the efficacy of behavioral observations and data recording on the behavior of the observer (referred to as the “observer effect”). This presentation will share findings of three experiments with undergraduate student participants that investigated the observer effect. In the first experiment, participants recorded data while observing a video model of guided compliance. In experiment two, participants recorded data while observing a peer trainee implement guided compliance and then provided performance feedback. In experiment three, participants recorded data while observing numerous videos of a teacher implementing guided compliance and answered questions regarding teacher implementation within the videos. Across all experiments, performance improved for some participants; however, experimenter feedback was necessary for most participants to meet criterion performance. Specifically, the observer effect was not consistently found. Implications of these findings as they apply to training staff will be presented.
 

Training Supervisors to Provide Performance Feedback Using Video Modeling With Voiceover Instructions

AMBER R. PADEN (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute), Elizabeth J. Preas (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute), Amanda L. Gibson (May Institute), Natalie Ruth Shuler (West Virginia University)
Abstract:

Supervisors often use performance-feedback to train staff members to implement behavioral interventions. However, few studies have focused on evaluating methods to teach supervisors to provide effective feedback. The purpose of the current study was evaluate the use of video modeling with voiceover instructions to teach supervisors to provide performance feedback. In Study 1, we used a multiple-baseline design to evaluate the use of video modeling with voiceover instruction to train nine supervisors to provide performance feedback to a confederate therapist implementing a guided-compliance procedure. Specifically, we assessed supervisors’ accuracy with implementing eight feedback component skills during scripted role-plays before and after video modeling. We also assessed the extent to which supervisors’ skills generalized when providing feedback to an actual therapist implementing the guided-compliance procedure with a child with autism. All supervisors mastered the feedback component skills following video modeling. During Study 2, five of the supervisors trained in Study 1 used performance feedback to teach five therapists working with children with autism spectrum disorder to implement a guided-compliance procedure. All therapist learned to implement the guided-compliance procedure with a child with autism. Overall, the results of the current study suggest that video modeling may be an efficacious and efficient method to train supervisors.

 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE