Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Event Details

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Symposium #63
CE Offered: BACB
Recent Applications and Extensions of Equivalence-Based Instruction
Saturday, May 25, 2019
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Fairmont, Second Level, Gold
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Leif Albright (Caldwell University)
CE Instructor: Leif Albright, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The three talks in this symposium describe studies in which equivalence-based instruction (EBI) was used to teach classes of animal features, food portion estimation, and verbal operant academic content. The first study was a replication and extension of O’Neill, Rehfeldt, Ninness, Muñoz, & Mellor (2015). Computer EBI was compared to studying from flash cards to teach Skinner’s verbal operants to college students. In the second study, which was an extension of prior studies in which EBI was used to teach portion estimation of food items, non-food items were used during training to increase portion-size estimation accuracy. Preferred and non-preferred foods were used to assess generalization of portion-size estimation accuracy. In the third study, which was a replication of Keintz, Miguel, Kao, and Finn (2011), EBI was used to teach three classes of animal features and to evaluate the emergence of visual-visual and auditory-visual relations and speaker behavior by children with autism spectrum disorder. Together, the three studies in this symposium extend the content domains and procedures that can be used to establish equivalence classes of relevant content.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): derived relations, equivalence, verbal behavior
Target Audience:

The target audience is practitioners who work with children with autism, and those who use equivalence-based instruction to teach socially relevant content.

 

Comparing Flash Cards and Stimulus Equivalence-Based Instruction to Teach Verbal Operants to College Students

Gayathiri Ramadoss (Caldwell University), Kenneth F. Reeve (Caldwell University), LEIF ALBRIGHT (Caldwell University), Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University), April N. Kisamore (Hunter College), Tina Sidener (Caldwell University)
Abstract:

The present study compared the effects of computer-based stimulus equivalence-based instruction (EBI) to that of studying from flash cards to teach Skinner’s verbal operants. Ten undergraduate or graduate students enrolled in an introductory course in Applied Behavior Analysis served as participants. One group was exposed to EBI and a comparison group studied a set of flash cards with all the stimuli presorted into correct groups. Four classes of verbal operants (mand, tact, intraverbal, and echoic) were taught. Each class consisted of 4 stimulus members (name of the term, a colloquial definition, formal definition, and vignettes). Generalization of class-consistent responding was assessed for participants in both groups via a series of sorting tasks, written tests, and computer-based matching tests. Both IOA and treatment integrity data were at least 99%. The results of this study showed that participants of both the EBI group and the flash cards group formed classes across all testing formats. The results of this study did not align with past research in showing efficiency of EBI compared to studying pre-sorted flash cards in establishing academic skills with advanced learners. Overall the EBI group performed at a level that was 10-15% above that of the control group.

 

Equivalence-Based Instruction With Non-Food Items to Increase Portion-Size Estimation Accuracy

Brianna Regan (Caldwell University), Jason C. Vladescu (Caldwell University), Kenneth F. Reeve (Caldwell University), Ruth M. DeBar (Caldwell University), JACQUELINE CARROW (Caldwell University)
Abstract:

Researchers have previously taught individuals how to more accurately estimate portion-sizes of foods using equivalence-based instruction (EBI). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether non-food items could be used during training to increase portion-size estimation accuracy. Preferred and non-preferred foods were used to assess generalization of portion-size estimation accuracy. Foods were identified through an assessment and varied per participant. Two non-food items were used for training and one novel non-food item was used to assess for generalization of portion-size accuracy. Three classes of stimuli were taught using EBI (i.e., ¼ cup, ½ cup, and 1 cup). The members of each class were represented by portion-size measurement aids, amounts on paper plates, and measuring cups. All participants more accurately estimated each portion-size of non-food items after training sessions. Accurate estimation also generalized to preferred and non-preferred foods for all participants. IOA and procedural data were at least 99%.

 

Teaching Creature Features to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Equivalence-Based Instruction

LAUREN GRITENAS (Caldwell University), April N. Kisamore (Hunter College), Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University), Kenneth F. Reeve (Caldwell University), Peter F. Gerhardt (The EPIC School), Leif Albright (Caldwell University)
Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to replicate Keintz, Miguel, Kao, and Finn (2011) by evaluating the effects of EBI on emergence of visual-visual and auditory-visual relations and speaker behavior by children with autism spectrum disorder. We extended Keintz et al. by evaluating a many-to-one training structure, evaluating the emergence of auditory-auditory relations, and teaching language skills commonly targeted in early intensive behavioral intervention with early learners. Specifically, we taught three 4-member classes of stimuli: donkey (Class 1), seal (Class 2), and cricket (Class 3). Members of each class were the pictures of the creature (Stimulus A), creature’s spoken name (Stimulus B), sounds made by the creature (Stimulus C) and pictures of the creature’s habitats (Stimulus D). Results for all participants increased from low levels during baseline sessions to 86% or higher following EBI. Emergence of speaker behavior was also observed for all participants (i.e., tacts of pictures, tacts of sounds, intraverbals related to sounds and habitats, intraverbal fill-ins, echoics). Interobserver agreement for listener and speaker pretests across all three participants ranged from 94%-100%. Interobserver agreement for teaching relations and listener/speaker post-tests across all three participants was 100%. Percentage of correct implementation of the teaching/training procedures was 100%.

 

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