Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Event Details

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Symposium #516
Ethics in the 21st Century: How the Laws and Regulations of Yesterday Shaped Our Practices Today
Monday, May 27, 2019
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Swissôtel, Lucerne Ballroom Level, Lucerne 1/2
Area: PCH/OBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Nelmar Jacinto Cruz (Florida Institute of Technology)
Discussant: Thomas R. Freeman (ABA Technologies - Florida Tech)
Abstract:

Over the years, laws and regulations have been established in an effort to protect clients and hold practitioners accountable. The ethical responsibility to clients and the field spans all areas of behavior-analytic research and practice. While these rules and regulations serve to protect our clients and ensure we do no harm, it is important to understand where they come from and how they affect us today. The topics presented in this symposium explore how behavior analysts currently discuss ethics and how OBM is represented in the US in regard to laws and regulations. The first presentation is an ethics literature review that examines publications across behavior analytic literature to explore how ethical behavior has been discussed and researched in peer-reviewed journals over time. The second presentation examines behavior-analytic licensure and how regulations within each state vary and affect the practice of OBM.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, licensure, literature review, OBM
 
Our Ethics Today: A Literature Review of How Ethical Behavior Has Been Discussed and Researched
YAARA SHAHAM (Florida Institute of Technology), Nicholas Weatherly (Florida Institute of Technology), Shannon Biagi (Florida Institute of Technology), Nelmar Jacinto Cruz (Florida Institute of Technology), Samuel Shvarts (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Over the years, efforts have been made to establish ethical standards to protect clients and hold practitioners accountable. These efforts include the creation of laws and regulations, shaped by events such as the Belmont Report and the creation of the Ethical Standards for Psychologists. These events and others have led to the creation of ethical guidelines and practices in the field of behavior analysis, most recently the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (2017) that governs behavioral practitioners today. With the evolution in the development of ethical regulations and requirements, there is a growing amount of information available to behavior analysts to guide ethical decision-making. Within this context, it’s important to examine what behavior analysts have done with this information and how we have experimentally evaluated and intervened-upon ethical situations in our field. This presentation examines publications across behavior analytic literature to explore how ethical behavior has been discussed and researched in peer-reviewed journals over time.
 

Regulation and Licensure Applied to Organizational Behavior Management: Should OBMers Consider Board Certification?

NICOLE ADRIAENSSENS (Florida Institute of Technology), Nicholas Weatherly (Florida Institute of Technology), Nelmar Jacinto Cruz (Florida Institute of Technology), Estefania Carla Alarcon Moya (Florida Institute of Technology), Michael Patrick Cusick (Florida Institute of Technology), Ryan Joseph Walz (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Luke, Carr, and Wilder (2017) commented on how the BACB’s certification requirements are not specific to clinical service. The certification is in behavior analysis, thus applicable to a wide range of practice, including Organizational Behavior Management (OBM). The authors provided numerous rationales to the certification’s applicability to OBM, detailing how fieldwork requirements can be tailored towards OBM activities and connect numerous task list items to relevant OBM literature. While the article provided extensive examples on how the BACB requirements are relevant to OBM, the extent to which OBM practitioners can and should be credentialed also extends to licensure. Yes, the certification and OBM are compatible, but do the current regulations recognize OBM practitioners the same way as their clinical practitioners? The purpose of this presentation is to examine behavior-analytic licensure and how regulations within each state vary and affect the practice of OBM.

 

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