Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

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Symposium #224
CE Offered: BACB
Injuries Observed in Functional Classes of Self-Injurious Behavior
Sunday, May 26, 2019
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Hyatt Regency West, Lobby Level, Crystal Ballroom C
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Jennifer N. Haddock (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute )
Discussant: SungWoo Kahng (Rutgers University)
CE Instructor: Jennifer N. Haddock, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is common among individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Little is known about the relations between the forms and functions of SIB and the injuries it produces, yet there is reason to believe relations may exist. Hausman et al. examined the relations between automatic and social reinforcement functions of SIB and the location, type, and severity of injuries it produced in 64 individuals hospitalized for SIB. Results indicated that, of the 55% of individuals with injuries, engaging in a single topography of SIB increased risk of injury, and automatically reinforced SIB increased risk of head injury, specifically. Similarly, Rooker et al. examined the physical characteristics of SIB-produced injuries across groups of individuals with socially reinforced SIB and Subtypes 2 and 3 automatically reinforced SIB (see Hagopian et al., 2017). Results indicated that Subtype 2 automatically reinforced SIB produced the most frequent and severe injuries. Further, an inverse relation was found between the level of differentiation in the functional analysis and the number of injuries across groups. Although results of both studies are preliminary, they suggest the function of SIB may influence the severity and location of injuries produced. Implications for future research and clinical practice will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional analysis, injuries, self-injurious behavior
 

Examination of Injury Characteristics Across Functional Classes of Self-Injurious Behavior for 35 Individuals

NICOLE LYNN HAUSMAN (Kennedy Krieger Institute; Johns Hopkins School of Medicine), Griffin Rooker (Kennedy Krieger Institute; Johns Hopkins School of Medicine), Alyssa Fisher (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Meagan K. Gregory (Kennedy Krieger Institute; Johns Hopkins School of Medicine), Jennifer Lawell (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Louis P. Hagopian (Kennedy Krieger Institute; Johns Hopkins School of Medicine)
Abstract:

Limited research has examined how the functions of self-injurious behavior (SIB) relate to the production of injuries and the location, type, or severity of those injuries. In the current study, clinical and medical records were coded for 64 individuals hospitalized for SIB. When injuries were present, the physical properties of SIB and injuries were assessed across groups of individuals with automatically and socially maintained SIB. Results indicated that injuries were observed for 35 of the individuals who engaged in SIB. Individuals who engaged in a single form of SIB were more likely to have injuries (p < .05). Further, individuals with SIB maintained by automatic reinforcement had significantly more severe injuries to the head than those in the social group (q < .05, p = .0132, H = 12.54). Although results are preliminary, the results provide evidence that the function of SIB may influence the severity and location of injuries produced.

 

Examination of Injury Characteristics Across Functional Subtypes/Subcategories of Self-Injurious Behavior

GRIFFIN ROOKER (Kennedy Krieger Institute; Johns Hopkins School of Medicine), Louis P. Hagopian (Kennedy Krieger Institute; Johns Hopkins School of Medicine), Jessica Becraft (Kennedy Krieger Institute; Johns Hopkins School of Medicine), Noor Javed (Kennedy Kreiger Institute), Alyssa Fisher (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Katharine Finney (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract:

Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is inherently problematic because it can lead to injuries, including those that are quite severe and may result in loss of function or permanent disfigurement. There is reason to suspect that the function of SIB can affect its form, and consequently the injuries that SIB produces. The current study classified the physical characteristics of injuries across groups of individuals with automatically reinforced SIB (ASIB Subtypes 2 and 3) and socially reinforced SIB (attention and tangibly maintained). Differences were identified between groups, with individuals with ASIB Subtype 2 having the most frequent and severe injuries. Further, an inverse relation was found between the level of differentiation in the functional analysis and the number of injuries across groups. Additional research is needed to replicate these findings, and determine how the function of SIB affects the injuries it produces.

 

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